Resources >

How To Name Your Consulting Firm: Learn How Others Did It

How To Name Your Consulting Firm: Learn How Others Did It

Have you struggled with how to name your consulting firm? When consultants launch their own independent practice, it can sometimes be a challenge to choose the perfect name for their practice.

Should it be their name? Something revolving around their industry or service expertise? Or something catchy and fun?

In this resource, more than 200 consultants share the story of how they named their firm — and what, if anything, they’d do differently with hindsight. 

Here we share these examples, grouped by the overall categories they fall into:

Consulting Firms Named After the Founder

Alan Walker LLC

Website: alanwalker.llc

Founder: Alan Walker (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2019

Story behind the name: 

I wanted a name that would give me flexibility in my proposition(s), which I thought might change over time. And I didn’t want anything that sounded “too clever.” So I looked at what most of the ‘big’ consultancies have done, and just used my own name.

Focus of the firm:

Mostly Insurance industry. Mostly Business (usually Digital) Transformation, Operating Model Design, and Change Management.

Looking back on the decision:

I am happy with it.

Advice for others:

You really want your web address and email address to match your business name — but of course all of the “good” .COM names are already taken. I originally owned, and therefore launched my business with, alanwalker.com (which I bought many years ago). But I sold that to another Alan Walker. A key discovery that helped with that decision was that you can get a .LLC domain name. And to me, alanwalker.llc is even more suitable for Alan Walker LLC than alanwalker.com was.

AMBER Consulting

Website: amberconsulting.ma

Founder: Abdelhamid Bernoussi (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

Assuming that I would start my practice as Consultant I decided to give it my name. My name being quite extensive and sounding foreign to the US Market I decided to use my initials as I always did in Consulting (when signing work papers and memos). Founding that a 3 letters name was not attractive enough, I decided to combine my initials and my last name. This is how I came up with AMBER consulting.

Focus of the firm:

Industry: All
Functional: Strategy, Corporate Finance, and Transactions M&A
Geographical: Western Europe and North Africa

Looking back on the decision:

I would have chosen the same name. In my opinion the name of the practice is important but not essential. Clients are providing you opportunities as they trust you as a person and as a professional. Practice creator should focus on finding first customers and first assignments and not spending too much time on the name of the practice. The name can evolve and will evolve with the success of the practice.

Advice for others:

Don’t spend too much time on the name. Name is not essential. Your customers will come only because they trust you and you are recognized as professional in your field. As a consequence naming your practice John Smith Consulting is completely fine.

Anna Engströmer GmbH

Website: engstromer.com

Founder: Anna Engströmer (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2019

Story behind the name: 

I wanted to be recognized clearly and my name is unique. I also wanted to make it clear that I am independent and hold the legal stature needed in my country in order to be selected for more serious consulting.

Focus of the firm:

Strategy creation and implementation; effective help in service transformation. Procurement, finance, operations, IT.

Looking back on the decision:

I would probably have invested a little bit more, maybe in a logo and some promotional materials. I could have promoted myself more effectively. Easy to say afterwards…

Advice for others:

Make it clear that it’s about you. Don’t confuse people that you would sell projects and others would step in and do the work. Less is more. I think it does make sense to create and own your website, that you can edit on the fly. A professional one looks better but it also conveys that you buy rather than do. I’m a doer. I help others do. I like the “can do everything” image.

Autrique Consulting Group

Website: autriquecg.com

Founder: Gonzalo Autrique (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2012

Story behind the name: 

My first consulting company is named with my last name. Not the best strategy, My last name is not easy to spell and say in either Spanish or English. I cannot change the legal name of the company but I now call my company ACG.

My second consulting company (established 2022) is the initials of the name we, my partners and I, wanted SDP Consulting; Solution Design Partners (SDP).

Focus of the firm:

Management Consulting and Inventory audits.

Looking back on the decision:

I would chose a much easier name as I did with my second company.

Advice for others:

If possible use a name that communicates your value proposition.

Bauer & Associates, Inc.

Website: bauer-inc.com

Founder: Dan Bauer (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2002

Story behind the name: 

This is not my first consulting business. I founded, operated, and sold a previous consulting business that focused on — and was intentionally named/branded for — the education market. In launching my current practice, I expected my firm to remain a one-person shop that I would simply close down after I was done with it (i.e., no desire to sell it).

Furthermore, I found that prospective clients were more responsive when approached by a CEO whose name was the business name. Finally, my professional credentials, education, network, and experience were/are the primary assets and reasons-to-hire the firm, so it made sense to feature my own name in the practice name. Adding “& Associates, Inc.” gave me the latitude to add contract resources and specialists as needed for specific engagements.

Focus of the firm:

Marketing strategy, competitive analysis, and market research for B2B clients nationwide and international.

Looking back on the decision:

Looking back, I would not have done it differently. I would choose the same name.

Advice for others:

  • Consider additional services, markets, etc. that you MIGHT want to add in the future so your practice name doesn’t become a limiting factor.
  • Solicit candid feedback from a number of trusted and truly objective sources, including non-friends and non-relatives, before you finalize your practice name.
  • Purchase URLs with all possible spellings and iterations of your practice name, including hyphenated versions and multiple domains. Better safe than sorry.
  • Have a knowledgeable attorney do a through trademark search in advance to ensure you won’t face any legal challenges down the road.
  • Do a thorough check of all major social media platforms to confirm that others are not using the same or similar practice names.

Belden Menkus

Website: www.menkus.com

Founder: Belden Menkus (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2002

Story behind the name: 

I just named it after me. Bad idea.

Focus of the firm:

I work with organizations to help them get better at strategy.

Looking back on the decision:

No. I’d have picked something less linked to me personally.

Advice for others:

1) Unless you are already famous for what you do, don’t name it after yourself.
2) Don’t spend too much time worrying about it beyond that.

Boeffel Consulting

Website: boeffel.net

Founder: Nils Boeffel (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2008

Story behind the name: 

Consulting is personal — it starts with trust and develops a relationship with the client who is looking for the solution to a problem. The decision was either a name that was generic (ABC consulting — not personal at all, no added value in the name), something that points to a focus area (Agile Consulting or similar, but this narrows the area of focus possibly too much), or a simple name to start building the relationship and trust with the client.

Focus of the firm:

Focus is on large project implementation, transformation, etc. and also agile strategy, digitalization, and managing complex projects and organizations. Geographically most projects are in Europe but with an international scope.

Looking back on the decision:

I would do the same. After a while you build your name into a brand that is recognized for what you do well. There are so many consultancies with average names that are easy to forget that I’m happy to have picked a personal name.

Breuer Partners & Company

Website: breuerpartners.com

Founder: Thomas Breuer (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2002

Story behind the name: 

The criteria I used was as follows:

1. Had to be a private corporation incorporated in IL where I am based. Why: a corporation in the eyes of potential clients is considered more serious/professional.

2. My last name had to be prominent in the name of the corporation. Why: in the eyes of potential clients my decades of experience is the main asset of the company.

3. The name needed to show that the company will be more than one pony show/strong. Why: in the eyes of potential clients more consultants implies success and more resources to satisfy their needs for professional services.

Focus of the firm:

Assisting medical technology and life sciences clients to significantly grow their international sales and profits. For our USA clients we assist them to grow in Europe, Asia, Latin America, MENA. For our non-USA clients we assist them to grow in the USA, which for them is international. We also assist private equity firms and M&A firms in due diligence projects and/or growing the sales of companies in which they have invested.

Looking back on the decision:

2022 marks the 20th year since the launching of BPC. I still see no need to change the name of our company.

Advice for others:

Think very carefully the key criteria for deciding on the name of your practice. Consult with a trusted lawyer plus your own trusted advisors.

Burnie Group

Website: burniegroup.com

Founder: David Burnie (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2011

Story behind the name: 

I had thought of a whole bunch of creative names associated with the type of consulting I was planning on doing. I ran them by my wife, who has years of marketing experience, and her response was “Your clients are buying you. They trust in your experience and expertise, and they trust in you. Don’t get cute — name your firm after yourself.”

The initial name of our firm was “The Burnie Group” — on our 10th anniversary we simplified it to “Burnie Group.” If someone is planning on naming a firm after themselves I’d suggest not adding “The.” The letter T is late in the alphabet so it pushes you down in searches, and clients often search for you by your firm name and it’s counter-intuitive to search on “The.”

I have found that there are many advantages of naming your firm after yourself. There’s no confusion when you walk into the room or when you send someone an email that you’re the leader of the organization. Also, there’s some “cache” with meeting the president and founder of an organization.

Focus of the firm:

We focus on addressing the most pressing operational challenges of our clients. Industries of focus include banking, insurance, telco, and private equity.

Looking back on the decision:

The only change, as mentioned above, would be to start with “Burnie Group” instead of “The Burnie Group.”

Advice for others:

When coming up with a naming convention I’d suggest first.last@site.com. I’ve known many people who do something like first@site.com, but they run into problems later when they start adding people with the same first name.

CAPCOST SRL

Website: capcost.it

Founder: Francesco Caporali (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2013

Story behind the name: 

Since there were two founding Partners, our surnames being Caporali and Costantini, we started playing with them to find a name for the company that could work. We came down easily to Capcost and Costcap; since we specialize in Procurement, Capcost seemed the better option. And it put also the surnames in alphabetical order, so there were no problem in explaining why this order, too. It’s funny because people find out the origin of the name very rarely, so when we tell the story, there’s a little surprise effect.

Focus of the firm:

ICT Procurement.

Looking back on the decision:

No regret, the name has worked nicely. I registered also costcap.it domain, just in case we changed our mind.

Advice for others:

Have a story to tell and choose a name which is simple to pronounce and remember.

Carkenord Consulting

Website: carkenord.com

Founder: Barbara Carkenord (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2016

Story behind the name: 

I knew that I wanted to work independently (no employees) so I stuck with my last name. It is an unusual name and is known in my industry because I have written a few books.

Focus of the firm:

Business analysis and project management. All organizations need strong critical thinking skills and analysis. I help organizations build their analytical strengths, improve communication and collaboration, and solve problems for their organizations.

Looking back on the decision:

The only problem I have had with my name (and operating as an LLC) is business licensing and tax requirements. I should have just used my full name and operated as a sole proprietorship. I am a digital nomad and don’t want to apply for a business license in every location I visit. Many US counties and states don’t understand nomads and require business licenses as a revenue source.

Advice for others:

It is worth spending some time thinking about this. I have started 4 different companies and learned lessons with each naming. Innovation Experts was too general. The Knowledge Exchange (a training company) didn’t scream training so we had to do a lot of explaining. B2T Training (connecting Business to Technology) played off the B2B acronym but did not age will.

You want to be clear to potential customers about what results you are offering to them. You should also think about the size you hope to grow to, some companies’ names sound like big businesses but if you are a boutique that won’t make sense. Name changes are expensive and can hurt your brand so choose wisely.

Chris J Donnelly

Founder: Chris Donnelly (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 1995

Story behind the name: 

I knew that I needed a generic LLC that would allow me to include differing kinds of businesses alongside my consulting businesses. Essentially, running the expenses of “unknown businesses” over the last 26 years required something that was a bit more generic than specific. I chose Donno as it was a good fit and flexible. The name Donno was a nickname I had throughout college on sports teams (from Donnelly).

Focus of the firm:

Marketing, Brand, CPG, Omni channel, Unit economics/pricing.

Looking back on the decision:

Yes, it worked out very nicely.

Advice for others:

Stay flexible. Trying to put too much into the name is an attempt to be able to gain/promote business through a name. I find that the networking and referrals do not have much to do with the name and are the primary source of my business.

Clapham Consulting, Inc.

Website: claphamconsulting.com

Founder: Susan Clapham (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 1997

Story behind the name: 

After a few days of trying to think about it, I decided upon Clapham Consulting because it was meaningful, simple, people could remember it easily (from my name), and it allowed me to define/redefine what services we offer over time. Now after 25 years, it’s fun to see clients using my firm’s name in invites, monthly business reviews, etc.

Focus of the firm:

Clapham Consulting delivers results focused on improving profits and performance for people and organization. We do LOTS of things: Leadership, Operations, Transaction-support, and Strategy in any industry/sector. We’ve served clients in most continents (Asia, Australia, South America, Africa, Europe), 70% of our work has been in the USA & Canada.

Looking back on the decision:

Yes, I would keep the name.

Advice for others:

Consider what’s meaningful and relevant for what you want your firm to be and do.

Clement Consulting LLC

Founder: Rebecca Clement (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2006

Story behind the name: 

My practice name is extremely unoriginal! I needed to register a name quickly to get insurance in place for a project and using my last name was the simplest approach.

Focus of the firm:

Project/program management across industries.

Looking back on the decision:

Probably, I sell myself and my skills so the practice name has not been particularly relevant.

Corporate Hartz LLC

Website: corporatehartz.com

Founder: Jennifer Levine Hartz (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2000

Story behind the name: 

Because my work is around Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainability, with a bit of Family Philanthropy, the ‘Hartz’ got to be a play on words. Thought of it in the middle of the night, woke up my husband Eric Hartz, who’s initial response was a groan! He grew to like it and I get frequent compliments to this day 🙂

Focus of the firm:

CSR, ESG, DEI, Family Philanthropy.

Looking back on the decision:

I think I got it right!

Advice for others:

It should reflect what you do. It’s always obvious when someone makes a grandiose name for a group of fewer than 10.

Dr. Nigel D’Silva Management Consultants & Advisors

Founder: Nigel D’Silva (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2009

Story behind the name: 

I named my independent practice after my name as it would be unique.

Focus of the firm:

Industry focus: Financial Services, Fintech, Edutech, Shipping ports and logistics.
Functional Focus: Strategic Advisory, Risk Advisory, Economic Advisory, Business Analytics.
Geographic Focus: Asia, Australia.

Looking back on the decision:

Yes, I would choose the same name.

Advice for others:

Your practice or firm name should be unique, most important reflecting the services you offer.

Dr. Ulrich Riedel Consulting GmbH

Website: drulrichriedelconsulting.ch

Founder: Ulrich Riedel (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2019

Story behind the name: 

First: I started with the offer: it is unique (it doesn’t exist elsewhere, at least in Europe).

Second: The offer is centered around me. I will highly likely never have full equal employees, probably not even consultants. I only work with a network of highly skilled experts and very senior managers, for input on very specific subtopics.

Third: My name is quite generic in the German speaking countries Switzerland/Germany/Austria.

1+2+3: “Dr. Ulrich Riedel Consulting GmbH” (GmbH = Ltd).

I will stay alone, I am at the center of what I offer (not a methodology or so), and with my generic name I needed to include my first name. The “Dr.” still means quite a lot in the German-speaking countries. Therefore: “Dr. Ulrich Riedel Consulting GmbH”.

Focus of the firm:

I improve the likelihood that a ready-to-implement, large, complex project/ strategy/ transformation/ PMI/ etc is being implemented successfully. I significantly reduce implementation risk, and significantly increase the intrinsic value of the underlying project. All at usually no additional cost or investment or person-power, rather the opposite: less complexity, more simple interactions, improved clarity on what really matters. All with only 1 or 2 (rarely 3) focused interventions/improvements, I call them “Gold Veins”: small in size, large in impact, they were always there, I only discovered them and ensured that they got executed.

Looking back on the decision:

So far, I would use the same name. My Logo is similar to Dr. Ulrich Riedel // CONSULTING. This abbreviates to UR//C .The email address is a bit long, but people usually scan or click or google or LinkedIn, and don’t type. So yes: people don’t have to learn to major pieces of new information (my name, and my company name): they only need to remember one. And the “//” seems to be catchy enough to support their memory when they have some new interaction after a longer break.

duHadway, LLC

Website: duhadwayllc.com

Founder: John DuHadway (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2008

Story behind the name: 

I created an entity to hold my private equity investments and simply used my last name (and since its an LLC) it requires “LLC.” I then later had some consulting activities and simply began running through the entity and the rest is, as they say, history.

Focus of the firm:

We provide fractional C-suite leadership for early and growth stage companies. Our primary sectors served are financial services, technology, real estate, hospitality and Business services.

Looking back on the decision:

I would not make it personal and would have a name that is more descriptive of and relatable to what we do.

Advice for others:

Most try to save money in the early stages. Engage a brand expert to help you through the process. In the long term the cost is minimal.

Edelman Advisory Services

Founder: David Edelman (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

I knew my name was my biggest brand asset, with over a million LinkedIn followers and a long reputation. So I just built off that. I also knew that the vast majority of my engagements would just be me, working alone. Then, I knew my service would be Advice, so Advisory Services seems to be simple and clear.

There are other “Edelman” named businesses, but none with this specific string of words. If I put that name as a signature or on an invoice, etc., everyone would immediately know what it was for.

Focus of the firm:

Marketing in its broadest sense: go-to market, brand, product/market fit, digital, customer experience, organization, martech. I focus on service business and B2B. I do not work in packaged goods.

Looking back on the decision:

I am fine with the name.

Advice for others:

Think about the value of your name if it really is focused on you, but create something broader if you are likely to scale and need your name to connote more of a positioning than a label.

Gage Advisory Services

Website: gageadvisory.com

Founder: Bill Gage (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2015

Story behind the name: 

I wanted to be known for being an advisor. I was also intending to remain a solopreneur.

Focus of the firm:

Financial consulting and fractional CFO services. My primary industry is the commercial property & casualty insurance industry. Geography is within the US.

Looking back on the decision:

Yes, I like the name.

Harinwest

Website: harinwest.com

Founder: Villepekka Harismaa (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 1987

Story behind the name: 

Originally founded in days when still a student. This name combined my surname (Harismaa) with invest and turned out to be Harinwest as that was available.

Focus of the firm:

  • CEO excellence
  • Leadership development
  • Talent acquisition
  • Facilitation of value creation agenda
  • Planning of value creation activities related to growth, profitability improvement and organizational change
  • Implementation of business change

Looking back on the decision:

Maybe not. Maybe something that would brand the consulting.

Hollingsworth Consulting LLC

Website: hollingsworthconsulting.net

Founder: Brad Hollingsworth (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

I incorporated my name knowing I would rely heavily on my network for leads and referrals. I felt comfortable knowing that I can always pivot with a “doing business as” (DBA) if there is a need or opportunity to change the name.

Focus of the firm:

Team based problem solving (Lean Six Sigma primarily) as well as Voice of the Customer, Strategic Planning, and Leadership training. Geographic — located in Ohio but we consider the United States and Canada as our primary market.

Looking back on the decision:

I would have used the word “group” because I now plan to add consultants to my practice.

Horwitz & Co. LLC

Website: horwitzandco.com

Founder: Barry Horwitz (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 1997

Story behind the name: 

I had begun work on some projects before deciding that this would be my path. I didn’t have a business bank account, and was told that a check to Horwitz & Co could be deposited in a personal checking account. Admittedly a lazy approach — and I’m not sure that works any more. I thought about “and associates…” but I don’t have associates. I do have a company. In the back of my mind, I also figured it worked for Bill Bain… The LLC was not added until much later — I operated as a sole practitioner for many years first.

Focus of the firm:

I focus on strategy development for early stage companies and nonprofits. I would say global, though most of my work is with US-headquartered organizations.

Looking back on the decision:

Probably yes — and I have thought about it over the years. Explored “Strategic Edge” years ago, but didn’t make the change. Now as I am arguably late in my career, and have operated with this business name for ~25 years, I have figured it is not something I will change.

Using a firm name, rather than my own name, might allow me to appear larger, though I have not shied away from letting people know I am a solo who can bring in partners. I also can’t “protect” my name — and occasionally (ironically, just this morning) I received a call from someone who found my contact information linked to a firm called Horwitz LLC, which apparently is a large construction contractor in Minneapolis. I also run into challenges when people misspell my last name with the more common “Horowitz.” I was unable to acquire “horwitz.com” since, back then, a company selling URLs of last names had secured it and the price they wanted was too high.

Advice for others:

It has not been that bad operating with my name on the door, though if I were to build a firm, rather than operate as solo, I’d put more thought into a company name that is different. I wouldn’t get too “clever” and I would seek something that is intuitively easy to spell, and that can make for a reasonably short URL. I do think that using the domain name for email and a website is the most professional looking approach — though I notice that far more traffic now comes through my LinkedIn profile. Still, I update my website with my monthly newsletter.

Ichbiah and Company

Website: ichbiahandco.com

Founder: Romain Ichbiah (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2016

Story behind the name: 

My name.

Focus of the firm:

Strategy, CDD, M&A in the US and in Europe. Sector-agnostic.

Looking back on the decision:

I am happy with it.

Advice for others:

Unless you plan on selling the business at some point (which means it has to grow enough), I don’t believe name is that important. If a solo, people will think of you, John, Jane, and not the XX Group. If you do want to build something large enough (many associates, internal or freelancers), then maybe a generic name makes sense, but even then, there was McKinsey, Booz, AT Kearney, Roland Berger (etc.) and those were people. I believe that what I sell is my brand (for better or worse) and hence, the best name to convey that is mine. But ultimately, I don’t believe there is a “one size fits all” approach. Pick a name you like and feel good about putting out there, on the web, on your slides, etc. When you find it, you’ll know. It will sound right.

JHL Solutions, LLC

Website: jhl-solutions.com

Founder: Juli Lassow (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2017

Story behind the name: 

JHL Solutions: ‘JHL’ (my initials) and ‘Solutions’ because I knew that I wanted to communicate solutions as part of my value-prop. Also, ‘JHL Consulting’ was taken.

Focus of the firm:

Retail Supplier Partnerships — specifically building, vetting, onboarding and negotiations strategies for retailers and their owned brand/private label suppliers.

Looking back on the decision:

I hadn’t done a ton of work on my offerings at that point, but looking back, I would have liked to include something more specific to my industry focus of retail.

Advice for others:

Come up with a few names and check your secretary of state website to check availability right away. Suggest securing a related domain name ASAP after registering. I made the mistake of hunting around a bit and that is why my site is ‘www.jhl-solutions.com’ instead of ‘www.jhlsolutions.com.’ Both were available when I first went to look. The next week, the ‘-‘ free version was $5,000.

JL Holland & Company Ltd.

Founder: Jeff Holland (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2017

Story behind the name: 

I wanted a name that didn’t pigeon hole me into one particular specialist such as ‘lean’ or ‘operations’. I also wanted a name that suggests the company has more than one employee so that I could put a team together to take on complex problems. Finally, my goal in retirement is build high-end custom guitars, so the name of the company means that I can use the same name for making guitars (like CF Martin & Company).

Focus of the firm:

Operations (Manufacturing, process, service), North America.

Looking back on the decision:

Happy with the name.

Advice for others:

Think of a name that gives you flexibility to grow and broaden your services rather than limiting you to your current specialist.

JTG Ventures

Website: jtg-ventures.com

Founder: Joseph Gwozdz (LinkedIn)

Year founded: Undisclosed

Story behind the name: 

It is my initials. Not a lot of creativity. Kept it simple.

Focus of the firm:

Fractional CFO / COO functions, M&A support to private equity firms.

Looking back on the decision:

Would keep it the same.

Advice for others:

Don’t overthink it.

Kelly & Yang

Website: kellyandyang.com

Founder: Chris Kelly (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2007

Story behind the name: 

My surname and wife’s Chinese maiden name. By using our real surnames, this avoids us having to register our business name. Plus it appeals to both Western and Chinese clientele.

Focus of the firm:

Risk & assurance services across all industry sectors except financial services. Client work in UK, US and Australia.

Looking back on the decision:

It’s a unique name so I think we got it right.

Advice for others:

Check if there are any local business name registration obligations and whether there might be options to avoid those, for instance by using your own name. Consider whether a domain name is available.

KJS Interim Management

Founder: Klaus Steinhauser (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2011

Story behind the name: 

After careful market analysis in my country I decided to open a consulting firm for companies restructuring and provide it for several projects in Brazil, and start international services around world — which was successfully accomplished in 25 project assignments in 10 countries.

Focus of the firm:

All type of manufacturing industries, the majority in automotive and FMCG food industry. 

Looking back on the decision:

I would choose the same name.

KSLowery LLC

Founder: Karen Lowery (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2018

Story behind the name: 

At the time, I had a job offer that I was going to do contracting for a handful of months before I joined full-time. Since I never had any intention of choosing consulting full-time at the time, I didn’t even consider taking the time to choose a values-based, industry focused name. I simply chose the obvious name: My initials and last name.

Focus of the firm:

Supply Chain and Operations consulting — anything from building Sales & Operations Planning (S&OP) systems and processes to network optimization to finding cost savings through sourcing and operational efficiencies.

Looking back on the decision:

I would not choose the same name. I would choose a name that reflected my work and my values.

Advice for others:

Keep it short, memorable, and relevant to the services you are offering.

Lazarin Consulting

Founder: Alexander Lazarin (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2022

Story behind the name: 

My surname is not very common. I wanted for the name to convey the fact that I am personally responsible for the work, so I decided to use my surname as the name of my practice.

Focus of the firm:

Retail Credit Risk Management and Data Science. Seeing new business opportunities in data.

Leff Consulting LLC

Website: ileneleff.info

Founder: Ilene Leff (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2000

Story behind the name: 

When I left McKinsey, the advice was to use my name.

Focus of the firm:

Human Resource Management and strategy for small and mid-sized firms in the New York area, and social sector organizations, especially compensation, domestic and global.

Looking back on the decision:

Through the years I tried other names such as

  • Growing Organizations, since that was my preferred client.
  • Ilene Leff, Inc., when I was an S corp. for tax reasons. That served its purpose.

I think I would choose Leff Consulting LLC. I am my own advertisement, I do not have to develop name recognition of another name. Most of my clients are people who know me.

Mark Travis & Company, Inc

Website: travis-company.com

Founder: Mark Travis (LinkedIn

Year founded: 2015

Story behind the name: 

I originally named my practice LTBL Consulting Group, Inc when I left IBM in 2004. I thought it was clever as it stood for “Let There Be Light,” which is what I should be doing for my clients. Right?

A well known consulting/entrepreneur coach told a group of us that since we are independents that we should name our practices after our names. If you’ve done a good job for someone in the past, it’s easier to find you if their thought process is “What was that consultant’s name? Yeah, get Mark Travis to look at this. He’s with Mark Travis & Company” versus what company was he with, again?

You need to build your personal brand to survive as an independent. If you are building a multi-person practice, this doesn’t apply.

Focus of the firm:

My current tagline is “I bring businesses closer to their ideal customers by helping people see and imagine things differently.” My primary focus is teaching people how to build better intuition around their markets and offerings, and using data to test hypotheses. I work globally with companies, primarily those interested in harnessing Industry 4.0 technologies.

I should point out that I have taken a break from consulting to start an AI company in the Advertising (AdStock) space called Fractal Rock Solutions. It’s a double entendre in an abstract way. AI and machine learning are math functions designed to remove the fluff and reveal the hidden internal structure. I also want to create a fun work culture, so I plan to play off the Fraggle Rock franchise. I may eventually sell the company, and if I do, i want to build brand-equity in a name that someone else can take ownership.

Looking back on the decision:

Absolutely. I wish I’d done it in 2004 instead of 2015.

Martin Wilhelm

Website: martin-wilhelm.com

Founder: Martin Wilhelm 

Year founded: 2019

Story behind the name: 

Pretty easy — as I am a freelancer, my name was the most obvious choice.

Focus of the firm:

Focus on the one that is delivering the consulting work.

Looking back on the decision:

I am marketing myself as a one-man show, I am still convinced I took the right choice.

Parag Soni

Founder: Parag Soni (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2017

Story behind the name: 

We did it in a somewhat backward way; since the practice was going to be focused on energy, we knew most of the terms energy were going to be taken in terms of a domain name, so we focused on creating the shortest possible domain name that would be available. I believed that long emails are hard to remember, so we wanted to keep the backend of the name on the email short. We then worked backward from identifying domain names available to create the name of the business. Now it is very rare that anyone uses the full name of the business but rather its acronym is most commonly used.

Focus of the firm:

The consulting practice is a global practice focused on all things energy (renewables), sustainability, Smart Cities, electric vehicles, and electric vehicle charging. From a functional perspective, the consulting practice does strategy, procurement, market studies, go-to-market analysis, competitor analysis, and M&A. In short, we cover the entire consulting spectrum.

Looking back on the decision:

Obviously we were in the very early stages, we were trying to come up with a name quickly because after that there is a significant amount of paperwork and registration of the LLC. The name is the lynchpin to start all of that. I would most likely have picked a 1-2 word name again with a short domain name because having a short email and a name you can remember is essential. Not sure what the other options would have been or whether the domain would have been available but we would have gone shorter on the formal name.

Advice for others:

Short and sweet if possible, keep email addresses short so that people can remember. One word is ideal but difficult to secure the domain name.

PG Consulting

Website: pgconsulting.com

Founder: Prabhakar Gopalan (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2014

Story behind the name: 

My consulting firm is named after me, eponymously. For a sole proprietorship, the firm name carrying your name implies your firm’s brand promise is also your own personal promise to your clients.

Focus of the firm:

Fractional CRO for VC and PE-backed B2B SaaS Technology firms.

Looking back on the decision:

I started initially as Whole Mind Consulting but very quickly changed it to my name because it made much more sense.

Poggendorff INTERIM

Website: poggendorff-interim.de

Founder: Frank Poggendorff (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2017

Story behind the name: 

Identification and realization of savings as an Interim Manager for all industries.

Focus of the firm:

Senior Advisory for Strategic Sourcing and Procurement.

Polak Consulting

Founder: Keith Polak (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2018

Story behind the name: 

I needed a name for the business. Being the creative person that I am, I named it after me.

Focus of the firm:

Supply Chain / Operations Improvement.

Looking back on the decision:

I would select the same name. Most of my work comes from past business relationships, so the name isn’t why I win work. It’s just a name.

Advice for others:

Who you know and the quality of your work is more important than what you name your practice. Pick a name and move on.

Rahlves Management Consulting Group

Founder: Marc Rahlves (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

Originally wanted to do something creative/fun but decided against it:

1. Would make it more difficult in an international context (also asked some friends for advice) and might also require some explanation.

2. Hadn’t established any brand around a certain style/approach/specialty.

Decided to use my own name to show it was my business. Added “Management” to consulting to make sure it showed what type of consulting. Added “Group” to allow for growth and create image it is not just a one person show.

Focus of the firm:

No explicit focus yet.

  • Focusing on MBB type of questions (vs deep technical/functional expertise).
  • Several industries incl. nonprofit and social enterprise.
  • Also offering interim management and coaching.
  • Due diligence support.

Looking back on the decision:

Not sure yet. Don’t think it has made a difference one way or the other. Would be nice to be a bit bolder.

Advice for others:

Don’t overthink it and get started.

Richard Fincher Consulting LLC

Website: richard-fincher.com

Founder: Richard Fincher (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2015

Story behind the name: 

Although you think your name and profession is unique in the universe, a “Fincher Consulting LLC” was registered as a Texas LLC a few months before my application. Although a bit longer, “Richard Fincher Consulting LLC” was available. To mis-quote Sgt. Robert “Bobby” Shaftoe in Cryptonomicon “there are many engineering consulting practices, but this one is mine”.

Focus of the firm:

Since 2015, Richard Fincher Consulting has provided engineering management consulting services and expert witness services in international manufacturing disputes, turning manufacturing disputes into profitable outcomes.

Looking back on the decision:

I’m happy with the Richard Fincher Consulting LLC name, however I wish that Fincher.com was available as a domain name.

Scott Potter Consulting 

Website: scottpotterconsulting.com

Founder: Scott Potter (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2017

Story behind the name: 

Being the primary point of contact for my practice, it was more transparent and direct to the companies that I consult with to use my name. I understand that it might deter potential employees to work for a company that has their name as the company name, but most of the times, it is me that the company will hire and I pull in subject matter experts who sometimes have their own companies, etc.

I have considered renaming my consulting practice and someday I might, but I have found that people hire me for my expertise, so it has worked so far. If I evolve to more of a multi-person company, I will most likely rename the company. Having been around a lot of people who have started other consulting practices, the three common themes are:

1. Have a story you love to tell people about the name which, ideally, conveys what you offer. Sometimes, the name choice can be a personal reason since it is such a personal decision to start a practice, so the tagline can describe the expertise.
2. Make it easy to remember.
3. Make it unique, searchable and a name that is available as a domain.

Focus of the firm:

I work with companies in need of digital product strategy and product management expertise. There isn’t a specific industry or geographic focus. I have worked with BtoB, BtoC, BtoBtoC companies through new digital products as well as reinvented ones and digital transformations.

Looking back on the decision:

I would have kept the same name. As mentioned, I might change the name if I evolve the business, but it has served me well so far.

SKJ Consulting Group Pty Ltd

Website: skjconsultinggroup.com

Founder: Karl Newman (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2018

Story behind the name: 

We were trying to use our surname within the business name but found that either the domain or business names had already been registered for the names we liked. We then started to use the kids initials and found that the initials SKJ included all of our initials from youngest to oldest or oldest to youngest. This then became our focus and is how we came up with SKJ Consulting Group Pty Ltd.

Focus of the firm:

We are based in Brisbane and provide most services within this area. However we have also worked on some overseas engagements. The key focus areas for us are the provision of outsourced CFO / Finance Manager services, management reporting and assisting companies with business improvement activities.

Looking back on the decision:

We would keep the name the same but would prefer a shorter email address. This is the only aspect we would consider changing going forwards.

STB Consulting LLC

Website: stbconsultingllc.com

Founder: Stacye Brim (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2014

Story behind the name: 

It’s simply my initials. I delayed in filing with the Secretary of State for awhile because I wanted to come up with a more clever business name. I never did so here we are! If a better name hits me one day I’ll do a DBA. It’s been 8 years though…

Focus of the firm:

STB Consulting partners with nonprofit and corporate leaders in the areas of strategy, PMO/project management, and process improvement.

Looking back on the decision:

If I could’ve been more clever, I would have come up with a business name separate from my name or initials.

Taffet Associates

Website: taffet.org

Founder: Greg Taffet (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2000

Story behind the name: 

Since this is a sole proprietorship we picked a name that creates a direct link with the firm to myself.

Focus of the firm:

Strategic Technology consulting, Fractional, and interim CIO services.

Looking back on the decision:

Yes would choose the same name as it helps bring in business.

Tatham & Sons Consulting

Website: tathamandsons.com

Founder: Matthew Tatham (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

When I was a boy, I was helping my dad clean up our garage. He went and bought a moving cart for the heavy objects in the garage. He painted it and painted “Tatham & Sons Moving” on the side. It made me feel so special, involved, and included. It really motivated me to help. It stuck with me ever since. I hope to provide that same feeling to my son one day (Jack, 3).

Focus of the firm:

Supply Chain Planning, Global.

Looking back on the decision:

100% would keep it.

The Petrova Experience LLC

Website: thepetrovaexperience.com

Founder: Liliana Petrova (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2019

Story behind the name: 

I went through a very lengthy and painful process of looking for a name of my firm with the words customer/experience/CX or any combination of those words and all were taken: either as a web address or as a social media handle or both.

So, at the end my branding consultant who was doing my logo etc. said “Liliana, all of us who have worked with you know that there is “the Petrova Experience”. You bring so much passion to everything you do. Why don’t you call it that?” So I did.

I also have my mom and my daughter who are also called Petrova (Bulgarian last name for female gender). I like that meaning as well.

Focus of the firm:

Customer experience consulting in transportation, healthcare, education, retail, SaaS (BtoB), and travel. We operate out of New York but cover the world.

Looking back on the decision:

I would not change a thing!

Zalex Consulting 

Founder: Tanya Kratzer (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

My sons’ names are Alex and Zachary. I took the Z from Zachary and added to Alex to create Zalex Consulting — since almost all of my efforts end up benefiting them with college expenses, etc.

Focus of the firm:

Market research globally.

Looking back on the decision:

I would keep the same name. People ask about it often and enjoy when I explain it.

Advice for others:

Make it personal with a story to tell.

Zeichgeist

Website: zeichgeist.com

Founder: Arlene Zeichner (LinkedIn)

Year founded: Undisclosed

Story behind the name: 

I combined my last name, Zeichner, with term Zeitgeist (“the defining spirit or mood of a particular period of history as shown by the ideas and beliefs of the time”). Thought it was memorable and also conveyed a sense of modernity and since all my projects are digital…what could be more au courant?

Focus of the firm:

Digital media.

Looking back on the decision:

Happy with it.

Zeisler Consulting

Website: zeislerconsulting.com

Founder: Nicholas Zeisler (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2005

Story behind the name: 

It may seem counterintuitive that a name like ‘Zeisler Consulting’ may have an interesting genesis, but hear me out: I struggled over and over with numerous “clever” ways to name my practice. I’m from Denver, so I tried a bunch of tie-ins with Colorado or the outdoors, or being a “Mile High” as we call ourselves here based on the city’s elevation. As a very active alumnus of my fraternity, I considered several different ways of perhaps picking some esoteric name based on our secrets or rituals. I even considered using the names of the original founders (How would “Kennedy, Kingsbury, Patterson, and James” have sounded?).

And it was on the phone with a prestigious fraternity brother, in fact, when he suggested, ‘Nick, your own name stands out and is powerful and who and what you are… Why not just go with that?’ And that’s where it came from. Nice, too, because I didn’t have to worry about having a unique LLC.

Focus of the firm:

I provide Customer Experience consulting, Fractional Chief Customer Officer services, and also build entire Office of the Customer programs from scratch or from existing resources for clients seeking to drive alignment between Customers’ experiences and their Brand Promise.

Looking back on the decision:

It’s good, I think, but I sometimes wonder about how difficult it may be for people to find me based on the name not being *as easy* as others to spell.

Advice for others:

Don’t spend as much time on it as you think… It’s more important that you’re delivering a good service/product/experience. Get the fundamentals down of what you do and how you do it, and worry less about the name.

Consulting firms named after their industry >