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How To Name Your Consulting Firm: Function

How To Name Your Consulting Firm: Function

In this resource, more than 200 consultants share the story of how they named their firm — and what, if anything, they’d do differently with hindsight.

Here are their responses, grouped by the overall categories they fall into:

Consulting Firms Named For Their Function

Acctuate

Website: acctuate.com

Founder: Nitin Mittal (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2019

Story behind the name: 

I wanted a portmanteau for finance and an action verb. Actuate was taken by a software company and I could not think of a name with a derivation or permutation of “fin”. So, I settled on Acctuate, using Acct as an abbreviation for accounting.

Focus of the firm:

Fractional & Interim CFO, FP&A-as-a-Service, advisory on M&A and financing for tech and eCom companies.

Looking back on the decision:

Maybe I would choose something easier to spell and pronounce for clients.

Advice for others:

If the name is going to have multiple words, make sure the acronym is easy to remember and not generic or easily confused for industry jargon.

Adya Consulting & Resewrch

Founder: Saumya Sinha (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2012

Story behind the name: 

Adya means unparalleled in Sanskrit. I looked at other consultancies’ front and added “consulting & research”.

Focus of the firm:

Functional focus: Commercial due diligence and voice of customer studies.

Looking back on the decision:

No

Agreed Consulting

Website: agreed.io

Founder: Mark Crockett (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2019

Story behind the name: 

Over 20+ years, we have watched companies make promises, fall short and see execs get fired. The ubiquitous problem in organizations is Getting to Real Agreements. If people can back out, they probably will. And then things get ugly. Agreed is a purpose-built guide and software that brings people along with simple flows to get ideas approved. These are the 5 key steps:

1) Initial prioritization based on risk/reward.
2) Step-by-step business cases with the people who validate the data.
3) Get stakeholders to document their buy-in.
4) Make it easy for executives to drop knowledge and Agree in efficient stage gates.
5) ~100% agreement nearly every time.

Focus of the firm:

Agreed is a stage-gate process that brings everyone on board to get initiatives done. Knowing everyone is onboard. With no surprises. Agreed works across all industries and many geographies.

Looking back on the decision:

Once upon a time, we used founders’ initials or words that conjured fighting and deciding. Instead, we realized that the point is getting real Agreements across your organization. We are now very happy our company name is AGREED. It represents exactly what we help you do.

Allocation Advisors

Website: allocationadvisors.com

Founder: Scott MacComb (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2011

Story behind the name: 

I did a brainstorming exercise where I wrote down every descriptive word I could think of related to the service itself and the ways I want our clients to think of us. Then my wife and I looked at dozens of possible word combinations from that list. In the end we selected a name that spoke straight to the solution we provide without overcomplicating the name. To an outsider it doesn’t seem that clear but in the context of business acquisition accounting, it is readily understandable to CFOs needing to find a service provider to perform purchase price allocation services.

Focus of the firm:

Real estate purchase price allocation studies (determining the value of all assets and liabilities in a real estate acquisition and allocating the purchase price among those assets and liabilities).

Looking back on the decision:

The name has served us well. It makes us sound larger than we are since it is descriptive of the service itself.

Advice for others:

Keep it simple and understandable unless you have a large enough advertising budget to make people familiar with what you do. Refrain from too descriptive, and long, a name.

Analytixia Solutions Inc.

Website: analytixia.com

Founder: Masoud Behzadian (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2019

Story behind the name: 

My co-founder and I decided to focus on providing analytics solutions, so we wanted a name that hinted at that. We started brainstorming on names and went from an adjective + “analytics” to modified forms of the word “analytics” while also checking if the (.com) domains were available. So we went from Analytix to Analytixa to Analytixia and ended up on the last one.

Focus of the firm:

Analytics solutions (automated reports/dashboard, data warehousing, custom apps)

Looking back on the decision:

In hindsight, I would choose an easier name as most people have a hard time getting the name right in the first couple of tries!

Advice for others:

Get creative and see if you can pick a name that hints at the services you offer. Also, shop your name around with those close to you to see if they can read it easily (unless it’s obviously easy to read, like a friend of mine who has named his practice Analytics City).

Balanced Risk Strategies, Ltd.

Website: balrisk.com

Founder: Martin Pergler (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2014

Story behind the name: 

First, I felt that I wanted a name that was descriptive of what I stand for, rather than just pushing my personal brand (Martin Pergler Associates Inc.) or merely inscrutably memorable (like the Club of Rome thinktank, or Insert-Favourite-Greek-Letter Group). There’s no right or wrong, but each has connotations. With that decided, I wanted something that fulfilled a few criteria:

1) Reflected on a high level what I actually do – risk and strategy.
2) Gave at least some sort of nod to what’s distinctive about how I do it. This was the tough part, since much of what I could think of were long phrases, or more nouns, or just inscrutable.
3) Reasonably easy to remember, so no inscrutable acronyms for instance.

Process wise, I brainstormed words and phrases several times, and iterated that alongside writing my “one pager” (what I do, how, and why) that later became my marketing collateral. They influenced each other. When I had 3 concepts I liked, I shopped them around to a few other people. None of them got a great reaction (there were all sorts of connotations that I didn’t think of, but my friends sure did!), so I tried again. Of the 2nd set of 3, one was a clear winner.

Finally, two few mundane considerations came into play:

A) The company name had to reasonably well translate to a unique, memorable, and available domain name. And I was not willing to pay for premium domains. It turned out I could do this by abbreviating just a little bit in the domain name.
B) I was founding a Canadian, federally-incorporated company, so I also needed to translate the name into French, even though I rarely use the French version: Stratégies de risques équilibrés, ltée.

By this time I was exhausted of the process, and so I just quickly finalized the name and made sure NOT to ask my friends again, since I didn’t want to go back to the drawing board again… If they’ve thought of any other unfortunate interpretations, they’ve been polite enough to not mention them

Focus of the firm:

I help companies across different business sectors manage their risks better, especially with regards to making major strategic decisions that involve a lot of uncertainty. This includes both quantitative modeling, as well as more qualitative process design, governance, and corporate culture elements. It helps both minimize downside surprises as well as enable more confident risk taking in the pursuit of opportunity.

With regards to naming, it’s also important what I don’t do. I don’t optimize companies’ insurance coverage, implement compliance-focused ERM (Enterprise Risk Management) processes, do health and safety audits, or manage investment portfolios, so I had to kill off a few otherwise promising names that carried that as connotations.

Looking back on the decision:

I’m happy with the name. In fact I’m proud of it. I do jump back and forth between risk and strategy as lenses to use on companies’ business problems, so some days I do wish I had chosen a name that focused less on the word “Risk” and put “Strategy” or “Uncertainty” more to the fore. But I also fully realize that had I done that, on other days I’d regret de-emphasizing “Risk”!

Advice for others:

Especially when you’re starting, your name is your calling card. It demonstrates what you do, shows your focus (and that you ARE focused) and sets the tone. Therefore, don’t treat naming as an isolated question, a separate item on your “getting started” to-do list. Treat it as an integral part of defining who you serve, how, and why.

BControlTech

Website: bcontroltech.com

Founder: Helds Souza (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

BControlTech is the junction of the essence of what we do. We bring together business, control and technology. Of course there was a lot of other name options, but available domain in the internet and social medial was a point of decision.

Focus of the firm:

Our mission is to streamline business management, in particular Finance discipline through technology. Our office is in south of Brazil, but we support clients in entire country.

Looking back on the decision:

Maybe we would consider a more simple name, but it is a challenge to find a meaningful name with the domain available.

Advice for others:

Check domain, social media, and other companies with same names as you choose in order to not be confused.

BrandExperienced

Website: brandexperiencedgroup.com

Founder: Jonathan Paisner (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2007

Story behind the name: 

As something of a professional namer, this was definitely a case of the cobbler’s children. I wanted to incorporate. The urgency of that process drove some quick brainstorming and decision-making. And the URL was available, which sealed the deal. (A few years later, my side hustle quieted and I foolishly let the URL lapse. Someone else picked it up in the interim, so I now use BrandExperiencedGroup.com).

When I named my company, it was at the time just a vehicle for some side hustle consulting work. I aimed to tell a story that was a both outside-in and inside-out. On one side: I help companies develop a broad perspective in how their customers experience their brand. On the other side: I bring experience from a number of leading global brands to help them do that.

Focus of the firm:

The focus is brand strategy. Usually B2B corporate branding (as opposed, say, to product branding). We often work with companies managing the brand challenges that emerge in mergers, acquisitions and spin-outs.

Looking back on the decision:

The name works. It is somewhat suggestive – so it kind of puts us in category and saves some explanation. It is long. But I have felt that gives it a bit of heft or gravitas. In addition, a few years back I started leaning in to ‘be’ as a shorthand for an icon or favicon. I also use that as a communications element (i.e. be bold; be smart; be authentic; etc…)

Advice for others:

1. Be careful about being too ‘inside baseball’. It is easy to go down rabbit holes in naming – and sometimes you end up with really interesting ideas as a result. But other times this can get to overly complicated names that clients or others may have a hard time understanding or connecting to. Clever is good – but there is a point of diminishing returns if you are so clever that it fails to resonate and people don’t remember it.

2. Don’t get too hung up on the .com. Having NAME.com is just not as important as it once was for most companies. A simple descriptor (e.g. “NAMEgroup.com”) or some clever word upfront (getNAME.com) can help to solve this.

3. Screen the name. If the dot com is taken, by whom? Do a relatively deep Google search. Check the USPTO online trademark database. (Even if you don’t pursue a trademark, important to see if there are any potential conflicts.)

Coefficient X

Founder: Randall Foster (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2003

Story behind the name: 

I consider X = the client and is a variable that changes from year to year. My work is applied to X (in other words, a coefficient) to change X. Hopefully the coefficient is positive and the impact is a multiple or geometric versus simply additive. That was my idea. Find a client X and I will be the coefficient. As a side note my firm that I founded in 1995 and exited in 2003 was in the process improvement space and “efficiency” was certainly part of our constant nomenclature. So that was on my mind at the time. The name has held up because it is wide enough to encompass almost any kind of work.

Focus of the firm:

It’s changed over time. Today it is business growth and capital strategy for midsize or early-stage companies.

Looking back on the decision:

Absolutely yes would keep the name.

Advice for others:

Pick something unique and memorable. It does not need to be literal or descriptive in any way. There should be a rational connection and story with the name.

Combinatree

Website: combinatree.com

Founder: Sanjay Iyer (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

Started as a mathematical concept to analyze businesses through a combined, hierarchical view of metrics. While most business metrics are created and managed in silos, a combined view would help identify causes, effects and opportunities for improvement.

Focus of the firm:

Business value creation through analytics was the origin. Industry agnostic. But transitioned to innovation and product incubation by combining tech – an alternative to reinventing tech. While that may be the focus, I land projects in unrelated areas too.

Looking back on the decision:

Looking back, I think I am happy with the name. I would probably create different brands for different services I offer. But the name is abstract enough to fit in any context. None of my clients really care about the brand name.

Advice for others:

Keep it abstract. You never know what the next project would look like.

Connect Partners

Website: connectpartners.com.br

Founder: Camille El-Khouri (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2014

Story behind the name: 

I was resourceful at connecting people, companies, buyer and seller, client, and consultant.

Focus of the firm:

Mergers & Acquisitions.

Looking back on the decision:

I would choose the same name. Always receiving compliments.

Advice for others:

Think about what you’re good at or what you believe your value is in.

Core Insights Consulting

Website: coreinsightsconsulting.com

Founder: Ray Liu (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2017

Story behind the name: 

I really did NOT want to name my firm after myself and after working with a brand strategist and finding that many names that I liked better were unavailable, I settled on this name. My work focuses a lot on boiling down data to the key points and as I’m also someone who prefers to get to the point (rather than present for hours) – so Core Insights seemed like a suitable name for my practice.

Focus of the firm:

Industry: agnostic.
Functional: focus on data analytics and visualization, usually in a marketing or human capital context.
Geographic: open, but mostly near NYC area (as that’s where I’m based).

Looking back on the decision:

I’m still not in love with my firm’s name, but I really spent too much time thinking about it that it was preventing me from even applying for my LLC status and getting a website up. Psychologically, it made sense for me to just pick a name and go ahead with it.

Advice for others:

Think about what you’re good at or what you believe your value is in. I’d challenge folks to be creative and find a name that isn’t simply their first and/or last name + “Consulting”. At the same time, though, I’d also suggest that they not let this decision be a roadblock to getting their practice formally launched.

CustomStrat Advisory, LLC

Website: customstrat.com

Founder: Katie Liebel (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2019

Story behind the name: 

My expertise is in both strategy and customer experience. Also, I view the customer perspective as a critical lens in approaching business strategy issues. I had listened to one of Will’s sage podcasts recommending to name your company something meaningful, as opposed to just using the easy out of “Last name” following by consulting. So, I combined my two focus areas into one name.

I road tested it with my personal Board (i.e., one friend and my husband), so perhaps not the best control group! The “custom” has a double meaning of both custom strategy solutions and customer-focus. I use that as a talking point on my client introductions.

Focus of the firm:

I help financial service companies grow and transform, anchored in a customer perspective. I work with banks, insurance companies and wealth managers in the U.S.

I work both as an independent advisor and also pull together teams of independent professionals.

Looking back on the decision:

Looking back, I think I could have chosen something that sounds a bit more ‘corporate’ or conveys perhaps a larger firm. In addition, a name that is more memorable to clients and/or can roll off the tongue would be a better idea. And, as I do believe Will (or maybe it was David Fields’ book?) wisely suggested, testing my name on a few clients would have been a good idea!

Advice for others:

Reach out to an old colleague who was or is a marketing professional to bounce ideas off of.

Dana Growth Ventures LLC

Founder: Michael Bouhadana (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2013

Story behind the name: 

Practice focuses on growth. It’s broad enough to include other areas besides consulting.

Focus of the firm:

Merger integration, pricing strategy, performance improvement.

Looking back on the decision:

I probably would not use the same name. Adding ventures to my LLC describes too broad of an area. However, I’ve never had any client feedback about my LLC name, and I don’t think it significantly impacts client work one way or the other.

Demand Revenue

Website: demandrevenue.com

Founder: Alan Gonsenhauser (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2013

Story behind the name: 

My consulting practice focuses on growing revenue at B2B businesses. The name DemandRevenue: Demand is the demand function of new logo and upsell/cross-selling existing customers to drive revenue growth. “Demand” also means demand it!

Focus of the firm:

CMO Coach and mentor, Fractional CMO, Interim CMO, marketing leadership, strategy, alignment with sales, product and finance, customer experience, demand processes between marketing and sales, C-suite alignment. Healthcare and technology industries. Primarily North America and Europe, but also worldwide global reach.

Looking back on the decision:

I would keep the name!

Advice for others:

Make it easy to digest and remember and differentiating to your target audiences!

Demeter Strategy Design

Founder: Wendy Manning (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

It was important that the name reflect values that are important to me and what I offer to clients. Demeter is the Greek goddess of abundance. The name honors generations of strong feminine leadership in my family, acknowledges me as a leader and hints at the win – win abundant outcomes I create in my work.

A bit poetic, unusual and nuanced meaning yet very reflective of my work. I combine design principles with business (marketing, communications, technology) strategy to create leading-edge value for my clients, the people they serve and optimistically, humanity.

Focus of the firm:

Unlike other advisors who have a singular focus on a specific discipline, I am well-versed in a variety of matrix management challenges across multiple organization types.

In particular, B2B organizations looking to (re)invigorate processes and systems.

Looking back on the decision:

My name is a great conversation starter that allows me to talk through distinctions about why I do what I do and how my services add value to clients.

Digital Learning Solutions, LLC

Website: digitallearningsolutions.net

Founder: Vivek Ratna (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2004

Story behind the name: 

In 2004 the intent of my consulting practice was to develop an e-Learning (LMS, LCMS) solution and make it available on a subscription basis over the internet.

Focus of the firm:

I currently focus on Program/Project Management, Digital Transformation, Strategy and custom application development for the Financial Services, High-Tech and Oil & Gas industries.

Looking back on the decision:

Yes, I would have chosen the same name.

Advice for others:

I believe that the name of the Consulting practice does not necessarily have to reflect the type of service offering. For example the name eBay has nothing to do with on-line shopping and yet that is the name of the business.

een Consulting

Website: eenconsulting.com

Founder: Ian Tidswell (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2016

Story behind the name: 

Een Consulting is now increasingly doing business as Ideal Price. Een is a nickname that my South African cousins had for me when they were very young “Een = One in Afrikaans.”

Ideal Price is more about what I do and used for more packaged innovation pricing work.

Focus of the firm:

Pricing consulting, increasing for startups and innovative companies.

Looking back on the decision:

I probably would choose differently. Having consulting in the name is restricting (now I’m pivoting at least partially to Ideal Price).

Advice for others:

It’s somehow a very important decision and not very important at all. Think hard about it, don’t have a name that is too limiting down the road, but once you have a decision just run with it.

EENDIGO

Website: eendigo.com

Founder: Livio Moretti (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2018

Story behind the name: 

I wanted a 6-7 letters name that would allow me to create a simple .com site with just one word. My clients always complained that many consultancies focus on the strategy but then leave and do not care about the end-end journey. My core dogma is impact and I work globally with large organizations. I also needed a name that would be easy and nice to pronounce during a meeting.

I had few shortlisted and ran a survey to 20 people. So the solution was eendigo — easy to read and beautiful colors. E-end means “end to end” and IGO stands for “IMPACT in GLOBAL ORGANIZATIONS” and we had the site we wanted: eendigo.com.

Focus of the firm:

Commercial excellence, all sectors, global presence.

Looking back on the decision:

Sometimes the double E bothers me but I am getting used to it…so yes I would try one without two vowels at the start.

Advice for others:

Take time, make tests, ask around, see trends — names can also be in or out of fashion. Try to use popular name endings and something that is close to the audience and easy to remember, and not too hard when someone has to write you an email.

EX4CX: Execution for Customer Experience

Website: ex4cx.com

Founder: Rick Denton (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2017

Story behind the name: 

I’d been frustrated with the lack of getting things done in the customer experience world. Plenty of theory. Plenty of ivory tower thinking. Plenty of “here’s an assessment…best of luck!”

Along with my current customer experience background, years ago my career focused on project management and operational excellence. So I decided to combine the two major parts of my career experience — customer experience and execution, or getting stuff done. That created the brand EX4CX…Execution for Customer Experience.

Combining the inside-out of operations and process with the outside-in of customer to create Great Experiences, For Every Customer, Every Time.

Focus of the firm:

EX4CX helps companies create real, tangible business value from their Voice of the Customer (VOC) programs with the “Total VOC” approach:

Stop Survey & Score | Start Listen & Act

Companies reach out to EX4CX when they realize that the “shiny tool” they bought thinking it would solve all of their VOC and Customer Experience challenges isn’t delivering the results they expected. EX4CX helps companies unlock that business value by focusing on 9 dimensions of a Total VOC approach, leveraging great VOC tools AND creating the programs and disciplines around those tools to identify and deliver tangible, quantifiable business value.

Looking back on the decision:

I love my company name and wouldn’t change a thing but take a look at the advice answer…I do have a lesson learned.

Advice for others:

One lesson I did learn…I purposely chose a short name for ease of URLs and email addresses and other handles. But Twitter requires six characters and I’m one short. I still love my company name and brand, but for those who might be considering a name, keep in mind ALL of the possible social media platforms you might want to use.

Also, buy up all spellings of your URL. I failed to buy exforcx.com and someone has been squatting on it for years now

And, grab URLs that fit particular products you want to offer. For example, my podcast site is www.cxpassport.com My Total VOC assessment page is www.totalvoc.com
These are easy to point to pages on your main consulting site so traffic drives to your main site along with the niche URL

Execution Gurus

Website: www.executiongurus.com

Founder: Greg Calaman (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2017

Story behind the name: 

We are experts on strategic execution, which in our parlance includes any strategic change or transformation that a company goes through.  Notable areas of execution focus for us include merger integration, standing up a carveout, and new product/geography/strategy launches. 

Our methodology, ChAMP — Change Acceleration Management Process — is not only a tool for driving strategic change but also a tool for teaching how to do execution.  Since we work with middle-market private equity, most of the portcos we work on have never lived under institutional ownership and are consequently not familiar with executing rapid and dramatic change, such as integration of a series of assets into their platform.

Teaching them how to execute is as important as actually driving the change.  “Execution” clearly had to be in the name of the firm, but “Experts” sounded boring.  We jammed on “experts” and arrived at “Gurus.”  A “Guru” is someone who is not only an expert practitioner of a craft but also a teacher of that craft, so the dual meaning fit our characterization perfectly.

Focus of the firm:

For middle-market private equity, we do three main things: diligence (commercial and operational), strategy, and change execution. We complement those primary services with occasional and supplemental M&A advisory, strategic business development on behalf of clients’ companies, and executive recruiting.  We are geographically agnostic, although to be fair, most of our work has been North American-based.  From an industry perspective, we are generalists.  While our corporate backgrounds have encompassed finance, healthcare, retail, industrials, and technology, we have done consulting work over the last 15 years across all those sectors and more, including aerospace & defense, cybersecurity, food, consumer, infrastructure, and energy.

Looking back on the decision:

We would have absolutely chosen the same name! Execution Gurus conveys action and suggests we get things done.  It’s a perfect characterization.

Fisheye Consulting

Website: fisheye-consulting.be

Founder: Xavier Jopart (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2016

Story behind the name: 

This is a strategy practice. I am focused on helping clients getting a broader view of their business, mostly to explore new opportunities or to step back from day-to-day operations. I wanted to find a name that brings the idea of perspective and global view. Nothing better than the fisheye lens used to give an almost 180 degrees view with a camera!

Focus of the firm:

Strategy mostly, in a wide range of sectors but with a focus on Financial Services, Economic Development and SME, in Europe and the Middle-East.

Looking back on the decision:

Yes I would choose the same.

Advice for others:

Find a name that allows you to have a domain and Email address names that are simple. My domain and email addresses @fisheye-consulting.com are difficult to spell out.

GRECE Gmbh

Website: grece.at

Founder: Markus Gremmel (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

In the decision the following criterion was important to me:

  • Link to my surname (Gremmel).
  • Domain needed to be available.
  • Link to the work I do (growth).

Hence, I took the Spanish word for grow (crece) and replaced the C with a G for the initial of my name.

Focus of the firm:

Investment, consulting and work-for-equity with focus on sales, marketing, digitization, development of business models, and financial services.

Looking back on the decision:

I would name differently since Austrians struggle with the proper pronouncement.

Growth Insight, Inc.

Website: growthinsight.com

Founder: Bob Stevens (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2002

Story behind the name: 

Wanted to present something more dynamic than simply “strategy” or “corporate development” and came up with the idea of pointing to the insight that growth can be predicated on.

Focus of the firm:

Strategy and corporate development in general. Especially in mission, vision, values. Much work in igaming industry.

Looking back on the decision:

I like it, but it doesn’t really matter. I did change the logo and that was an improvement.

Advice for others:

I don’t think the name matters a great deal; I suspect logo, while also relatively unimportant, may matter more. In my case it’s not ideal that when the name is spelled in all lower case it doesn’t read correctly — people look at “growthinsight” and don’t see it as ‘growth’ and ‘insight’ but rather as “growthin” as in dieting. So that’s a nuisance I’d recommend guarding against…i.e. make it easy for people to remember and use.

GTI Consulting

Website: gti-consulting.com

Founder: Nuno Anjo e Silva (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2022

Story behind the name: 

I named my practice GTI Consulting mainly for memorability and positioning purposes. The name was born inspired by several things:

  • In my areas of action chosen by clients: Growth, Transformation & Innovation.
  • In my passion for cars: being GTI is one of the most universal and legendary acronyms of car production.
  • In the contradiction of the adages of two of the cultures I have experienced: the African with “If you want to go fast, go alone, if you want to go far, go together,” and the Portuguese “Quick and well done, no one can.”

Focus of the firm:

Sector and industry neutral, growth focused advisory. At GTI we develop & co-pilot bespoke Growth Acceleration programs addressing your unique opportunities & challenges and we inspire teams to “dare to accelerate” and to be “prepared to succeed.”

Looking back on the decision:

Without professional branding help, I would chose the same because feedback has been that: 

  • It’s memorable.
  • It’s me (advantage of being created by me!).
  • It’s clear if followed by the descriptor “Growth Acceleration, Transformation & Innovation.”

Inspiring Company Culture

Website: inspiringcompanyculture.com

Founder: Brenda Batista-Mollohan (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2019

Story behind the name: 

It represents the result I want to bring to clients and what I hope every one finds, an “Inspiring Company Culture”. Over my 25 years, I rarely found it. But, when I did and as a leader focused on creating it for others, it was transformational. We hit targets and were more productive than ever. Even now that the team is spread in different companies, we stay in touch and look for ways to work together even if just for a simple project.

Focus of the firm:

I work with people managers who want to reduce voluntary turnover and increase the collaboration, fun and enjoyment of their teams. That means everyone is heard and valued for the best that they bring.

Looking back on the decision:

I would keep the name. At first it felt awkward until others provided feedback about they like it and it explains what they will get when working with me.

Advice for others:

Make it have meaning to motivate you and be aspirational for those who come to know it.

Inward Strategic Consulting

Website: inwardconsulting.com

Founder: Allan Steinmetz (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 1998

Story behind the name: 

The focus of the practice was to help companies focus on internal constituencies to embrace change. In order to do that, companies would have to persuade internal audiences and employees to accept and understand “what was in it” for them, which required a new approach to internal communications that was experiential, social, and rewarding with recognition for taking on the new behavior. We codified a process to do that, by educating, motivating, inspiring, and recognizing employees to embrace change that we called “Inward Marketing.” Hence our name, Inward Strategic Consulting.

Focus of the firm:

Brand Engagement with internal, external, and supplier audiences/targets.
Team alignment with Visioneering.
External Branding and planning with Dialogue Marketing.
Internal Brand and Creative development with Inward Dialogue.
Marketing Consumer insights and market research with Change FX.

Looking back on the decision:

I would keep the name. 

Kenning Associates, LLP

Website: kenningassociates.com

Founder: Mark Ledden (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2002

Story behind the name: 

From the moment I founded my firm, I knew I wanted it to grow into a partnership where I had colleagues who were in all ways equal to me. So using my own name was out of the question. Still, I did want something that felt like an authentic representation of myself and the work the firm would do. My wife Susan suggested “kenning,” a word from a graduate course in Old English we both deeply enjoyed. I knew immediately she had found it.

Your “ken” is your understanding, and kennings are metaphors in which two words that have their own meanings individually are brought together to mean something new. For instance, the Beowulf author calls the ocean a “whale road” and the human body a “bone cage.” Kennings make new types of meaning from established meanings, and that is exactly what my partners and I do as executive coaches and organizational consultants. Additionally, it was a perfect encapsulation of who were are as a firm —  experts from diverse disciplines who mean and are something new when we bring our expertise.

Focus of the firm:

We are coaches, advisers, and strategic consultants for senior leaders in global consulting firms and fortune 100 companies. Most of our clients are based in North America, but we support them globally with engagements in all geographies.

Looking back on the decision:

I would absolutely keep the name, although I would have preferred to be just “Kenning” if the domain had been available.

Advice for others:

Unfortunately, you do need to think about what your domain will be as you choose your name. If a broker owns something you have fallen in love with, it may be worth trying to arrange a purchase. I personally didn’t feel comfortable considering non-traditional endings like .biz or .tv, but those may be more accepted now than they were twenty years ago.

Last Mile Ventures

Website: lastmileventures.com

Founder: Alessandro Santo (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2015

Story behind the name: 

LMV originated from my past experience in venture capital where lots (too many) of players abuse the word “start” and very little players are focused on the finish, on the exit. The idea here is focusing on projects that get to the finish line, to the last mile. “Being on the last mile” isn’t the best so I’m thinking renaming it to Extra Mile Ventures. My brand has zero brand recognition and zero investments in brand marketing, hence not a huge deal.

Focus of the firm:

Technology

Looking back on the decision:

I would have chosen Extra Mile Ventures.

LEAD Business Growth LLP

Website: leadbg.com

Founder: Dheeraj Mirpuri (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2016

Story behind the name: 

While conceptualizing the core purpose of my Firm, my Partner and I deliberated the value that our consulting work would add to the small to medium sized business ventures. The realization was pretty straight forward: ‘We help business owners LEAD their BUSINESS towards GROWTH, by strengthening their core foundation blocks around People, Process and Systems’! Instead of choosing a conventional name (i.e. XYZ Advisory or ABC Consulting Services, etc.), we literally came up with a name that simply speaks about the outcome that business owners can expect by utilizing our services — i.e. the ability to LEAD BUSINESS GROWTH.

Focus of the firm:

We help business owners transform and move from a traditional way of operating to adopting a professional demeanor to the way they run their business operations. Our solutions work in all sectors/ segments of businesses and we focus on small to mid-sized business ventures in India, at present.

Looking back on the decision:

Quite literally, I happen to use the name almost every day, in some conversation or the other. Besides, the name of my practice completely resonates what we bring about. I believe in the name and hence, there’s no other alternative that could convince me more, for sure.

Advice for others:

If you have conviction in your own practice, do not shy away from trying to be a perfectionist when it comes to any aspect of your practice. Some may not spend much thought or put in much time to come up with the ‘most appropriate name’ for their venture. Yes, these things consume a lot of time and effort, but the name of your venture is for ‘years to come’ and not just ‘now’! The ‘name’ is the first stone on the path of legacy that you intend to create. Hence, look at all possible angles, before zeroing in on THE ONE.

Leanmap

Website: leanmap.com

Founder: Joerg Muenzing (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2005

Story behind the name: 

  • Lean: make client operations fast and efficient.
  • Map: plan from current state to target state.

Focus of the firm:

Operational Excellence, Lean Transformation, Cost Reduction, Quality Excellence for Manufacturing and Service Operations — globally.

Looking back on the decision:

I would use the same, focus on Lean, eliminating operational losses so that every bit of time, material, and energy can be used to create value for humanity.

Advice for others:

Select an evergreen name that is meaningful to the value you create for your target clients.

LIGHT YOUR SPARK

Website: lightyourspark.fr

Founder: Caroline LAFFORET (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2018

Story behind the name: 

I chose the name of my company thanks to a coach who helped me brainstorm on the words that reflected my vision. My mission is to enable individuals, teams and organizations to understand their human potential and to foster it in order to successfully go through major transformations. To do so, I put the “light” on their unique “spark”…

Focus of the firm:

Change management, Human resources consulting, Learning and competency development, business coaching.

Looking back on the decision:

Maybe not in English because most of my clients are French and they don’t understand the name. It’s too long and difficult for them to remember.

Advice for others:

Make it short and easy to remember.

LinkCorp International Limited

Founder: Gall Francois (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 1994

Story behind the name: 

I left my investment banking job and started my own M&A advisory practice and named it LinkCorp International. As per linking corporations internationally I then returned to management consulting by joining Kearney. When I left with the 2001 bubble burst, I started my independent management consulting practice and reused the name, logo, etc. Different purpose, same name …. Still use it today 20 years later.

Focus of the firm:

Strategy and transformation & change — Reorganizations, merger integration, customer experience.

Looking back on the decision:

Yes I would choose the same name.

Advice for others:

As an independent, you, your skills and experience, work done, client list and referrals account for 80%+ of your success. The name of your practice is part of the other 20%. Should you scale up and start employing others, then a name becomes more important.

Maven Associates

Website: maven-associates.com

Founder: Mark Hess (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2010

Story behind the name: 

I hired a design freelancer to develop my first website. Part of the scope was to help pick a name. He developed a list of 20-30 names. To make the list the name in some form had to be available as a .com URL. From the list we narrowed it down to 5-8 and discussed the thinking behind the name, how it might affect the branding and any limitations on the URL.

We settled on Maven for a few reasons:
1) I was a big fan of the Malcolm Gladwell book of the same name and thought its meaning was consistent with the brand we were shooting for.
2) A little alliteration with my first name.
3) The letters M, A, V & N had some advantages with the layout of the logo with lots of these “V” shapes.

Focus of the firm:

Strategy consulting to the mid-market.

Looking back on the decision:

I have no complaints. Unless you are putting significant effort into your brand and branding, I don’t know how much the actual name matters. I have seen lots of single shingle consultants who don’t have a website, but have a name for their practice. For those people, I don’t think it matters. If you are building a group and want the group to have a reputation, then it matters more. But I still don’t think the actual name matters as much as how you build the brand around it.

Advice for others:

Focus more energy on building your website and newsletter than getting the right name. Also, I explicitly didn’t want my name in the firm name and think it was a good call. As the head of the firm you will always be the focal point for the client, but having a name that shows the team is beyond you, gives you some measure of sharing the load.

Monevate

Website: monevate.com

Founder: James Wilton (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2021

Story behind the name: 

I’ve actually had the name in my back pocket for a few years (and have been buying the domain “just in case” since that time). I liked the idea behind Accenture’s name (combination of adventure and accent), and I didn’t want to use my name, as I think firm’s with people names tend to sound stuffy, plus they make it harder for the founder to extricate themselves from the company. Monevate is a portmanteau of monetize and innovate, both of which are core elements of what we do.

Focus of the firm:

Pricing strategy and monetization. Startups, scale up, and fast-growing tech companies.

Looking back on the decision:

Yes, I would use the same name.

Advice for others:

Pick something with a story around it that reinforces what you do. That makes it memorable, and gives you a great talking point as you introduce yourself.

Next Act Advisors, Inc.

Website: nextactadvisors.com

Founder: Brenda McCabe (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2019

Story behind the name: 

I had done a lot of writing on the change in governance for companies based upon many years in corporate America and Europe and applying this to my client practice early stage founders (under another company name while in Europe). I gathered a group of like-minded practitioners and brainstormed on the type of consulting activities.

Second, with this group of like-minded practitioners (4 in total) I wanted a name that represented my stage in professional life (mature and silver haired) to serving as a bridge to the new generation of leadership, and rather than Last Act advisors I decided for Next Act Advisors. From this I developed a marketing brief with a description of the business, target audience, and the color schemes.

I engaged a professional on Fiverr who prepared three or four renderings. My collaborators and I voted and voila — I had a logo and templates for the company that I can use with other providers including website design, etc.

Focus of the firm:

NextActAdvisors is a white glove advisory firm serving entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs with disruptive technology including Healthcare technology, Medical Devices, Clean tech, and Enterprise SaaS.

At Next Act Advisors, my mission is simple. I want to assist entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs in building scalable, well-governed, and resilient businesses.

Next Act Advisors provides advisory services in the areas of strategy, capital allocation,
operational levers, corporate governance, compliance, leadership / CEO coaching, and team build-outs.

Looking back on the decision:

Yes it is working and getting traction.

Optio Tempore

Website: optiotempore.com

Founder: Ernest Miller (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2014

Story behind the name: 

Optio Tempore roughly means Timely Decision in Latin (my son was a Latin scholar in high school and college and he helped me with the translation). It seemed to me that “Timely Decision” is a key to effective strategy. Decisions must be correct, but they must also be timely, neither too early nor too late.

Focus of the firm:

Operations improvement, particularly for manufacturing, but also any operational intensive business such as warehouse and distribution.

Looking back on the decision:

Might have gone for a simpler name with fewer letters and easier to spell and pronounce.

Partners for Life

Founder: Ana Maricevic (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2014

Story behind the name: 

Life Sciences consulting – partner for.

Focus of the firm:

Life sciences – med tech, biotech, pharma.

Looking back on the decision:

My business it is based on networking, so it has not been of much consequence.

People. Performance. Reward.

Website: people-performance-reward.co.uk

Founder: Paul Hunter (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

We wanted something that would talk to areas we work across and also be very people centric because we are a Human Capital advisory.

Focus of the firm:

We are a 100% independent Human Capital advisory partner with expertise and experience in the areas of Performance and Reward, Executive Remuneration, Organisational Design and Strategic Workforce Planning.

We are based in London, UK and we are working with organisations across the UK and EMEA.

Looking back on the decision:

Yes!

PRIM
Projekt & Interimmanagement GmbH

Website: pr-im.com

Founder: Kurt Hänsler (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2015

Story behind the name: 

Criteria:

  • Should reflect what I was offering.
  • Domain should be still available.

I am offering Project management and Interim Management for all functions in a company, so I took the main letters – PRIM – as acronym. And the domain pr-im.com was still available

Looking back on the decision:

Yes!

ProductLivity

Website: productlivity.io

Founder: Lauren Chan Lee  (LinkedIn)

Year founded: Undisclosed

Story behind the name: 

I do product management consulting, and I had been writing a blog for a few months before coming up with the name of my practice. I noticed that I gravitated towards writing about how product managers collaborate with stakeholders, cross pollinate ideas from other industries or life, and become more productive and effective. My practice name, productLivity, is meant to capture that combination of things that is the essence of the product management role.

Focus of the firm:

Technology product management.

Looking back on the decision:

I’m happy with the name for now, but if I were to do it again, maybe would have picked something shorter or easier to remember. It’s a unique term, but can be misspelled or autocorrected to productivity. That said, I don’t think my practice name has impacted my business.

Advice for others:

Don’t let coming up with the name stop you from starting your practice. What you put on your legal documents doesn’t have to be the same name as what you call yourself, so you can always make a change later if you don’t think it fits.

PUZZLE BRANDING

Founder: Joanna Chekroun (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2018

Story behind the name: 

I wanted something that felt personal but at the same time relevant to my job. I happen to be a lover of jigsaw puzzles, and I realized that actually my job as a consultant is to piece things together (sometimes existing things and sometimes things which need to be unearthed or even created) to tell a bigger brand story. I also love that you need to have a fine eye for details but be able to see the bigger picture.

Focus of the firm:

Branding consultancy specializing in luxury.

Looking back on the decision:

Yes 100%.

Advice for others:

Don’t over-think it. Trust your instincts (there will always be someone around you who hates it) Make it ownable and if it’s a good ice-breaker in new biz or social meetings then even better.

Recast Partners

Website: recastpartners.com

Founder: Peter Bancroft (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

We focused on the central transformation that we intended to provide for our customers: Fundamentally updating and transforming their commercial capabilities. Playing around with words and concepts, we decided that “Recasting” under extreme heat like a blacksmith of old captured our intent.

Focus of the firm:

Recast Partners is a boutique management consultancy with a singular focus on supporting field and inside sales to drive profitable growth.

Looking back on the decision:

Happy with “Recast”. In retrospect, I might reconsider the “Partners” component.

REV Partners

Website: revpartners.com

Founder: Amitabh Chandrashekhar (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2014

Story behind the name: 

REV stands for: Results, Excellence, Value. These are the three key differentiators and drivers of client value. These 3 cornerstones continue to guide my consulting practice.

Focus of the firm:

Business Transformation and Strategy.

Looking back on the decision:

I would choose the same name.

Risk Pro Solutions, LLC

Website: riskprosolutionsllc.com

Founder: Soumya Chakraverty (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2019

Story behind the name: 

In coming up with a name for my company, I wanted to keep things simple and to the point. Instead of looking up Latin or Sanskrit dictionaries, I chose to stick to English so that the name would be comprehensible to all. Since my consulting practice was to provide services in risk management, the word ‘risk’ had to feature somewhere in the name. The other aspect of my service offering was around providing solutions in risk management and solving complex business problems. As such the word ‘solutions’ got included by default. The word ‘pro’ can be an abbreviation for many things – professional, program-oriented, problem-solving etc. I left it as pro deliberately to be able to use it situationally based on client needs.

Finally, I also had to come with a slogan that matched the name of the company. For that I chose: Risk Management is Our Business. Risk Solutions designed with your success in mind.

Focus of the firm:

I focus primarily on enterprise and operational risk management consulting, and including technology and cyber risks. I primarily service clients in financial services and public sector, although I am also open to other industry sectors.

I help clients improve their risk management practices by designing and implement processes and controls that embed the identification, awareness and measurement of risks as part of normal business operations, and also enables a risk-aware decision making culture at all layers of the organization.

Looking back on the decision:

I am not sure. While I still like the name, I would probably choose something that rolls of the tongue rather than Risk Pro Solutions. Also, I would have to be careful of not using oft-used and cliched terms like Sentinel, Hawkeye, Invictus, etc. I would definitely have to think harder next time. But for now, I am sticking to what I have.

Advice for others:

Keep it simple. Don’t overthink or go for fancy names. If you come up with a name that doesn’t mean anything to your clients or you have to spend a paragraph on your website explaining to people, it’s probably not worth it.

RoCKK

Founder: Claudia Genier (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

I first tried to express as clearly as possible what I was doing, i.e., consulting, research, knowledge creation and sharing and liaising/networking, building networks. From there I tried to compile to a meaningful acronym. The result: RoCKK stands for “Results-oriented Consulting, Knowledge and networKs.” This is both “solid” and “rocknroll,” a dance I used to practice on a competition level. I’m only using the acronym. If clients or prospects ask me, I explain — this gives an opportunity to tell what I’m doing.

Focus of the firm:

Strategy consulting in the philanthropic sector, mainly for funders and NGOs. Organizational transformation. Focus is on Europe and Africa (so far).

Looking back on the decision:

At this stage I would choose the same name.

Advice for others:

There needs to be a personal or a professional link to it, to provide sense, meaning.

S.T.R.I.V.A. Consulting Ltd

Website: benhamouconsulting.com

Founder: Raphael Benhamou  (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

When I was registering my company name (before I incorporated) I was using Benhamou Consulting, but I needed three options for the corporations authority. My second option was derivative of the my existing name, and for the third, I couldn’t think of another derivative name that I liked, so I decided to go a different route, rather than using my surname as the base.

I came up with S.T.R.I.V.A. by taking the services I wanted to deliver to my clients — STrategy, RIsk (management) and VAlue (adding) — and put the first two letters of each word together.

Of course the corporations authority decided to assign me my third option, because it was so different, that they figured no one else would come up with that one!

Focus of the firm:

Startups and SMEs mostly. I build bespoke financial, operational, and deep-dive analysis models for clients to help them with financing, strategic, budgeting and operational decision making, and then provide insight and advice based on analysis of the models. I’m now also starting to offer outsourced CFO services.

Looking back on the decision:

I would likely have stuck to derivative names of Benhamou Consulting. It would have been less confusing for my clients, as everything but the registered name is tied to Benhamou Consulting. It makes for an interesting ice-breaker though, so silver linings…

Advice for others:

I don’t know if it’s a unique decision-making process to my country (Israel), but maybe try to stick to names you actually want, rather than running out of ideas and going off on tangents. I’d checked that Benhamou Consulting wasn’t being used by anyone else, so I was sure (and my accountant assured me) that I’d get my first choice. I didn’t take the registration process seriously enough, and voila, the result is I got a name that causes me headaches — and no one knows how to pronounce it!

ScaleUp Consulting

Website: scaleupinc.com

Founder: Marcos Buelvas (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2017

Story behind the name: 

I made a list of names and words that I liked. I kept reviewing it and thinking of what I wanted the name to represent and what I wanted the name to say to its audience.

Focus of the firm:

Supply Chain Management. We work across industries but focus on Life Sciences and Consumer Products.

Looking back on the decision:

I like the name and would choose it again. The one thing I ask myself occasionally is whether it is the name for a bigger practice.

Advice for others:

Try to make it speak to your audience. Mine does do that. At some point you have to bite the bullet and go with it, it was painful to choose a name.

Seven Transformation Ltd

Website: seventransformation.com

Founder: Karen Thomas-Bland (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2021

Story behind the name: 

I worked with a web designer on it – we had a long list of names, shortened it to three and then mapped out each one with visuals and made a decision on the preferred name and visual identity. Ultimately I named the business seven because — unusually in the industry — I address all seven aspects of an integration or transformation: strategy, value case, operating model, customer, people and culture, data and technology, and processes. Adopting this holistic, enterprise-wide view and tackling all seven elements in the right order delivers the changes clients need to achieve or exceed their value case.

Focus of the firm:

Business Transformation and M&A integration cross industry and incorporating all functions.

Looking back on the decision:

There were three I really liked and my preferred name when we developed the creative didn’t look quite right in the category – so my chosen name worked the best visually hence I would still choose the same name. But its not perfect by any means!

Advice for others:

I would say take some soundings from others and think about the name in the context of what you do and how you will express it visually through all your channels. If you are going to use your own name (which I did at first) you potentially limit your ability to scale if that’s what you want to do.

Simplifier International LLC

Website: simplifier.co

Founder: Peter Eckart  (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2019

Story behind the name: 

After 20 years of consulting it became clear to me that the key ingredient of our ‘secret sauce’ (and my passion) is simplification. Hence, I had to find a name that has something to do with simplicity. My key driver was the availability of a suitable website. Pretty much all names on .com were gone (or outrageously expensive – pretty much the same for the other usual suspects, such as .net ), so I figured that the .co domain would do (even simpler). Again checking around what’s available around simplicity on .co, it turned out that ‘simplifier’ was available – I figured that then the ‘simplifier’ would be me –> works –> consulting practice name: check!

Focus of the firm:

Mainly US and Europe, mostly remote these days, mostly around growth / GTM / strategy / market entry, mainly in high-tech, aerospace, eCommerce, but also automotive, real estate, and others.

Looking back on the decision:

Very happy with my choice.

Strategy Management Partners

Website: strategymanagement.com

Founder: Gaelle Lamotte (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2014

Story behind the name: 

Wanted to have strategy in the headline for ease of search and identification.

Focus of the firm:

Clarifying and managing strategy and change initiatives, Vision/Purpose, embedding new ways of working including sustainability/impact. Exec Coaching and leadership development. Sector agnostic – typically corporates (public or private) in UK/EMEA; regulated financial services sector in Nigeria and Southern Africa.

Looking back on the decision:

Might have come up with an entirely made up name that’s catchy and still resonates with strategy; or linked to founders’ back story in some way.

Sound Health Advisory

Website: soundhealthadvisory.com

Founder: Afua Branoah Banful (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2018

Story behind the name: 

I wanted something that went beyond me so I was never going to use my name. I wanted to leave space for other people to become part of the consultancy and feel reflected in it. In my experience as a consultant prior, I had often felt that we recommended things that were unattainable for our clients and I wanted to be able to say that I provided advice that they could actually use – sound advice. So that is where the name of Sound Health Advisory came from.

Focus of the firm:

Health care – Provider and Health IT.

Looking back on the decision:

I would choose the name again. My focus Health care and the word health right in the name makes that clear.

Advice for others:

Follow your gut and know that you can change the name later on if you want to. Your clients with think of you rather than whatever name you choose. The name is more for official stuff. It is important but don’t let choice of the name be a big roadblock. Also, a simple name that is easy to remember will serve you well.

Strategy to Outcome LLC

Founder: Venkataraman TIruppayanam (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2020

Story behind the name: 

The idea is not to leave the client with a strategy document on paper but to support and deliver the outcomes they aspire to achieve together.

Focus of the firm:

Insurance, Real estate, Banking.

Looking back on the decision:

Yes, I like it.

Advice for others:

Need to show your passion and the client service that is to be delivered.

The Good Success Network, LLC.

Website: goodsuccessnetwork.com

Founder: Lekisha Middleton (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2015

Story behind the name: 

The name of my company actually stems from both my personal values as well as my experience working in corporate. At a point in my consulting career, I realized after hitting the proverbial wall, that all success is not good success. Other people’s versions of success led to continuous cycle of burnout. At that time I started the journey of rejecting society’s and other people’s definition of success to define what success meant for me and my life. I added the word network because I know that as a business owner, your network is critical to your success. I also focus on coaching others to define success on their terms and create experiences and opportunities for them to expand their networks.

Focus of the firm:

The Good Success Network is a global management consulting and executive coaching firm that focuses on creating a workforce that is equipped and a workplace that is equitable, diverse and inclusive. All of our work is centered around transformation and positive impactful change. We do this through Executive, Team and Leadership Coaching as well as our Management Consulting offerings that include: Organizational Change, Talent Strategy (with an emphasis on the Future of Work) and Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Belonging.

Looking back on the decision:

I actually started my company with the name Good Success Unlimited. The thing that stayed the same is the “good success” part because that directly aligns with the company’s mission and values. So, it’s important to note that your company’s name can evolve over time.

Three Horizon Advisors, Inc.

Website: 3horizonadvisors.com

Founder: Cheenu Seshadri (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2018

Story behind the name: 

It is derived from McKinsey’s three horizon of growth framework -—our clients have pointed to the fact that we support them with near-term tactical engagements as well as far out innovation / growth strategies. Our work is centered around managing current performance while at the same time maximizing future opportunities for growth.

Focus of the firm:

We serve middle-market technology and telecom companies as well as their investors. Our engagements include commercial due-diligence and value creation for portfolio companies and other corporates.

Looking back on the decision:

Absolutely as this aligns 100% with our core offerings.

Advice for others:

Keep it short and make it descriptive / intuitive (without having to explain it).

Thought Partners Pty Limited

Website: thoughtpartners.com.au

Founder: Richard Tyrer (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2004

Story behind the name: 

When I worked at McKinsey they often said you have to be a Thought Partner to your client.

This resonated with my approach to consulting and my underlying values. So much so that as soon as I left I registered the business name in South Africa and subsequently in Australia where I now practice from.

Focus of the firm:

Primarily strategy and operations in the mining and metals industry.

Looking back on the decision:

Yes I would. It still works very well for me and resonates with my clients.

Advice for others:

First understand your “Why.” What is the purpose of your practice and why would a client want to work with you? Use this to then help define your name and take it from there.

Total Enterprise Consulting & Coaching, LLC

Website: totalenterprisellc.com

Founder: Kurt Peterson (LinkedIn)

Year founded: 2015

Story behind the name: 

I wanted my name to not limit the scope of my practice, hence the first two words, Total Enterprise. We can work within operations or back office processes…the total span of the enterprise. Also, not only do we do consulting work but we do coaching as well. When put together, the acronym TECC sounds strong and advanced and also makes for spelling out the last 4 digits of our telephone number.

Focus of the firm:

Primarily we focus on operations, but also work in all areas of a business or organization. We work on capacity improvements, quality improvements, inventory reduction, and cost savings. We perform training and coaching and work projects and implementation of improvements with our clients at their sites.

Looking back on the decision:

I believe I’d keep the same name.

Advice for others:

Don’t limit yourself or the perceived scope of your business by choosing a name that’s too narrowly perceived. Don’t use your name as the business name. Choose a name that potential clients would perceive as very professional and geared towards their needs. But have some fun with it too.

Consulting firms named based on location >