Zero-waste Design

Zero-waste Design

 

Ushma Pandya addresses a most prevalent problem, and more importantly, provides strategic steps for integrating low-waste solutions into building designs.

Buildings are designed for comfort, productivity, entertaining and living. Buildings have historically not been designed to support low waste goals. However, that is changing as architects and developers have come to realize the importance of design in supporting low waste goals. A few years ago, the Zero Waste Design guidelines were developed and have been a catalyst for thinking about design and waste.

A simple example of the importance of design is the problem of collecting recyclable and organic materials (aka compost) in older office buildings. The pantries can be small and may not have a sink. There is no way to rinse recyclables and no room to put in a third bin for composting. If companies can solve the question of where to collect organic materials in their office space, the problem of where to store the compost bin in the loading dock area arises. If organic materials are not collected every day (and it may not be feasible economically), then a cold storage room is usually required to manage odors.

Without effective storage, tenants and property managers may be reluctant to embark on a composting program. The same issues arise in residential buildings where the refuse room is generally small and often does not have any room for compost bins, let alone recycle bins or any other specialty recycle bins.

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • Establishing low-waste goals
  • Understanding which key initiatives have design implications
  • Identifying space requirements

 

Read the full article, Low Waste Goals Need to Be Designed into Buildings from the Beginning, on LinkedIn.

 

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Bernhard Heine with Professional Business Coaches. Bernhard Heine is a Business and Executive Coach at Professional Business Coaches, Inc., (PBC, Inc.) a company he founded to help business owners and leaders achieve their vision. Bernhard has more than 30 years of experience working collaboratively with business partners in all phases of business management, restructuring and transformation, particularly in: strategic planning, marketing and sales, organizational design, engineering consulting, project management, coaching and facilitation.

Prior to forming PBC, Inc., he was Executive Director for Strategy and Business Development for eight years at Textron Inc. His responsibilities included: advising senior leaders, facilitating meetings and training sessions, leading strategic planning initiatives, conducting corporate and business strategy assessments, and screening attractive industry and business growth opportunities.

Prior to joining Textron, he was principal at Alliance Consulting Group, an e-business strategy consulting firm. Prior to that, he worked six years at Coca-Cola in Germany; advising the CEO and his staff on restructuring the German bottling system and implementing new marketing and sales strategies. Before Coca-Cola, he was a management consultant with the Boston Consulting Group, an international management consulting firm (also in Germany).

Bernhard started his career at a marine transportation consulting firm where he worked globally as a marine engineer on commercial shipbuilding projects, especially in Japan and South Korea.

Bernhard holds a BS in marine engineering from the US Merchant Marine Academy in NY. He also holds an MBA from Harvard Business School and is a Certified Professional Business Coach with the Professional Business Coaches Alliance, Certified Legal Practice Coach, and Authorized Client Builder Sales Trainer. Bernhard has also achieved the “Master Coach” designation from the PBCA in Sales, Coaching, Leadership, Marketing, and Exit Planning.

Stephen Redwood explains how organization design projects can fail to meet their objectives.

It’s a funny thing, but when it comes to the subject of organization design the first question clients usually ask me is: “How can we not screw this up?”Not unreasonably, clients recognize how unsettling these projects can be. They know that, too often, the results can fall short of expectations, so they want to minimize disruption and increase the odds of success.

 

In this article, points covered include:

-“Men are Moved by Two Levers Only: Fear and Self Interest”

-What The Eye Doesn’t See The Heart Doesn’t Grieve Over

-Beware Butterflies

-Broken Rearview Mirrors

-Everyone has a best friend

 

Read the full article, How Do Organization Design Projects Get Messed Up, on LinkedIn.

Robyn M. Bolton provides a few inside tips on how to work with resource constraints and the people who control them when you need to access the resources that will fund your innovation.

 

The process of setting annual goals and budgets can be frustrating and even demoralizing for employees and managers alike as their visions and budgets get slashed in each round of management reviews.

This process can be especially painful for Innovators who feel like they are expected to do more with less and, as a result, can’t even try to do anything new or game-changing because they barely have the resources to operate the current business.

Resource constraints are a reality in every organization. The trick is not to give up when you run into them, but to figure out how to work with them and, more importantly, the people who control them.

 

The steps are:

-Acknowledge reality

-Know where there’s flexibility

-Channel your inner Mick Jagger

-Make your case

 

Read the full article, 4 Steps to Get the Resources You Need to Innovate, on LinkedIn.