Work from Home

Work from Home

Susan Meier shares a post from Workspace Studio on the office of interior designer Antigone Michaelides.

What do you do?

I tell spatial stories. People ask sometimes, what’s your style? And I say that that’s an irrelevant question, and I refuse to answer it. What matters is that I listen, and I get this raw material, this narrative. And because I have certain tools from education and experience, I can translate that into a spatial story, which the person who gave me the narrative can inhabit comfortably.

Tell us about the space where you work.

It’s a double-height space, and upstairs is my son Leo’s loft. We have this very big solid wood surface that is one desk. One part is for Leo, and I have my working corner. Underneath the desk is a collection of materials, like stone or oak samples. All of my samples, all of my files, all of my stuff is in this little corner of the universe.

How would you describe your creative process?

On one side of my space, I keep what is current. At the moment, it’s an Alexander McQueen book and some things that fell off a chandelier. This is the kernel and the start of the process. There’s the start here of something that looks very feminine, very ethereal, very whimsical, but the underlying premise is very structural and rational, just like Alexander McQueen’s.

For commercial work or for museums or for reference, I use sketchbooks, because I need to flip back and forth. For residential projects, for some reason, I don’t want to use my sketchbook. I do it on loose leaf of paper. I don’t know why; this is a mystery to me. I start sketching, and it’s the beginning of an expression; we rise from the floor up, and onto the walls, and now I know where we’re going. The idea of sculpting space from the inside out is beautiful to me.

 

Key points include:

  • What helps productivity
  • The most important elements of the work environment
  • Rituals in the workday

 

Read the full article, The Design Of Folk Tales, on Workspace-studio.com.

 

Susan Meier shares a behind-the-design post from Workspace Studio. This week, in an interview with Amanda Hindlian, she discusses the form, function, and favorite aspects of her home office. 

What do you do for work?

I’m the Global Head of Capital Markets at the New York Stock Exchange, which means that any time a private company is thinking about ways to tap into the public capital markets, I’m there with my team to help them through that process. 

It’s fun because it’s global. I have a big pitch on Friday with the largest IPO of the year, and it happens to be a Chinese issuer. I have a team in China, and I’m spending a lot of time with them. Even though I can’t be in the meeting because it’s going to be fully in Mandarin, I want to make sure that they’re prepared. 

Tell us about the space where you work.

I have an office in my apartment in the city. It’s one of my favorite rooms in the entire apartment. There’s a TV on one wall, where I have CNBC on all the time. There’s a cozy orange chair that I really, really wanted for whatever reason. It’s wide, it’s sweet, you can really curl up in it and read and think. In a job like this, you can get heavily into execution mode and forget that there are longer term things that you want to spend your brain cells on. I love the fact that my home office has that space for me to do that.

How would you describe your creative process?

Thinking and trying to creatively problem-solve is my favorite thing to do. I don’t enjoy executing as much – it’s not as fun. In my current role, the creative thought process is around the core business – what’s our pitch? what’s the value proposition that we’re selling to a private company? are we doing it effectively? I’m also trying to bring into my role the bandwidth to think about the general trends affecting the world, because I think it’s something that will be interesting to potential issuers and where we can have a thought advantage in the field.

 

Key points include:

  • Protecting your time
  • Sources of counterproductivity
  • Daily rituals

 

Read the full post, The Grande Dame Of Wall Street, on WorkSpaceStudio.com. 

 

 

Robyn Bolton shares introspective insights and answers on working from home during the pandemic.

In middle school and high school my dad and I would have massive arguments about my math homework. And by “massive,” I mean arguments that make episodes of The Real Housewives look like polite differences of opinion over tea and crumpets.

The issue was not my struggles to understand the work (though I’m sure that played into things) but rather my insistence on knowing WHY I needed to learn the content in the first place.

My dad, a metallurgist before becoming a computer engineer, seemed to think the answers to “Why?” were (1) you will need to know this in the future and (2) because this is the assignment.

To which I would respond, (1) no I won’t because I’m going to be a lawyer or a writer and even if I’m not those two things I can say with 100% certainty I won’t be an engineer and (2) that is not an acceptable reason.

As you can imagine, things would escalate from there.

In the decades since, with the exception of some single-variable algebra and basic geometry, I have yet to use most of the math that I was forced to learn and I still insist that “because that’s the assignment/the rules/how things are done” is not an acceptable answer.

Usually I apply that same stubborn curiosity to help my clients find and capitalize on opportunities to do things differently and better, create value, and innovate.

But, in the last week as I, like most Americans, find myself largely confined to my home, my curiosity is extending to my own environment and habits and I’m not always prepared for the insights that emerge.

 

Key points include:

  • Why am I trying to maintain all my pre-pandemic habits?
  • Why am I watching non-stop news?
  • Why are there 6 dozen eggs in the refrigerator?

 

Read the full article, 5 Whys of Working from Home, on Milezero.io.

 

 

If your home office is a little lacking in motivational and inspirational energy, Susan Meier’s new project may help you redesign a creative space. The project she co-founded with photographer Hallie Burton showcases the inspiring home workspaces and the stories of those who work there. This post profiles the home office and insights of art director Marcus Hay. 

What do you do?

I’m an art director or creative director, and my main focus is creating imagery for photoshoots. I also do interior design and prop styling. It’s a mixed bag of different fields, but they all interrelate, and I use the same skill set throughout the different areas of my work. 

Tell us about the space where you work.

I work in the living area. It’s a small space. I used to have to move around with my computer to wherever the light wasn’t hitting, so that I could see what was going on on the screen. I finally got blinds installed last week, and it’s been a godsend, because I can actually sit at my designated “desk” now, which is the dining table. It’s a very simple Saarinen tulip table, and, for me, it’s perfect. I like to work on a desk that’s white, because everything kind of pops off it. It feels clean and harmonious. I regularly clear it, and it becomes a blank canvas each time I start a new project. I have foamcore pin boards with inspiration swipes and paint swatches and sketches. And then of course I love my sketchbooks. I love working with pen and ink, so I have a good collection of brushes and ink pens and black India ink, which is my go-to. I try to have everything so it can fold up and be put away at night.

How would you describe your creative process?

When I art direct a photoshoot, everything you do has to consider what the ethos of the company is and what impression they want to leave on their customer. Then I delve into research, and that could be Pinterest, books, movies, anything. It’s a gradual process of pulling together inspirational swipes, textures, color combinations.

It’s largely digital, but because I do have a large collection of things, so it can be very tactile. It’s an organic process. My job is to bundle everything up in a package, so it becomes a visual language that everyone on the photoshoot is going to understand. Then you hope the weather behaves.

 

Key points include:

  • What helps Marcus be most productive
  • The most important elements of his work environment
  • How his workspace has changed as a result of the pandemic

 

Read the full post, The Interior Soul., on workspace-studio.com.