vendor governance

vendor governance

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Anna Engströmer with Anna Engströmer GmbH. Anna is Swedish, has worked across Europe and lives in Switzerland. She worked 2006-2011 in McKinsey in Italy, in the Business Technology Office and the Operations Practice. She was a manager at Zurich Insurance (Finance and Sourcing) and at UBS (Vendor Governance).

She works independently for clients in Switzerland and Europe. She has vast experience in service design, strategic sourcing, vendor governance and financial performance management. She is fascinated about well-functioning systems, with clear rules of engagement and respectful and interest-based collaboration and negotiation. Problems that fit her are complex, cross-functional, new or old, requiring agility in grasping them and addressing them. She energizes from people, and cares about both organizational performance and people’s health. She is fluent in Swedish, English, Italian, German and French.

In her free time she takes care of and is challenged by her Swedish-Italian family. She’s an avid learner and covers a wide range of topics: healthcare, nutrition, wellbeing, neuro-feedback, business startups, and latin.

 

Surbhee Grover discusses diversity and inclusion and explains why solidarity is the key to forging a new paradigm of equality. 

The fashion industry saw one debacle after another in 2018-19 that demonstrated just how wide the gap is between how businesses should behave and how they do. In the recent past, Burberry, Gucci and Dolce & Gabbana have been hurt by adverse publicity highlighting their cultural insensitivity. 

Dolce & Gabbana’s “Eating with Chopsticks” commercials showed an Asian model trying to eat spaghetti with chopsticks. People called the ads disrespectful and racist, and the commercials were pulled within 24 hours. It was estimated that Dolce & Gabbana put ~$500 million (a third of its revenue) at risk as a result of the backlash. There have been many diagnoses offered (how did something so obviously offensive slip through the cracks of a diverse, global management team/ workforce?) and the general consensus has been that making strides in hiring for diversity doesn’t mean much if that diversity is not used effectively.

The last couple of years have seen diversity conversations expand to “Diversity and Inclusion”. But even as we fight for respect, religious sensitivities, representation on the Board, and the right to equal pay (for equal work), we might want to re-evaluate if this expansion is sufficient.

 

Read the full article, Making a Difference to Diversity Might Require us to Deviate from Existing Definitions, on the Thrive Global website. 

 

 

John Murray steps up and provides a post that tackles the divide in discourse surrounding current politics and pandemic issues. 

It is tough to get a majority of Americans to agree on anything these days, let alone an overwhelming majority.

Wait! Here’s something: ‘Political discourse in America has devolved and become toxic and dangerous.’

Last May, Pew Research published a study indicating that a whopping 85% of U.S. adults agreed that political debate over the past few years has become more negative and less-respectful; 76% agreed that debate had also become less fact-based.

It seems we can all agree that we can’t respectfully disagree.

Some folks, myself included, were cautiously optimistic that the COVID-19 crisis would bring us all closer together, and tone down the rhetoric and finger-pointing.

You know: create a rallying point that would allow us to all get behind a common cause in unity and positive enthusiasm?

Boy, were we wrong!

 

Included in this article:

  • MSNBC and FOX
  • Democrats and Republicans
  • Lessons from the Marines

 

Read the full article, The Elusiveness of Healthy Discourse, on LinkedIn.

 

 

An uplifting and sage post from Paul Millerd on what politics has become, racism in America, and why love eats politics.  

I’m sitting down right now at 11:03am in Spain to write this. I am not sure where I’ll end up or if I’ll hit send this week, but I wanted to give it a shot to write something amid the pain and anger in my home country.

I write this after spending the entire month of May fighting an infection in my gums trying to hide my fear of facing long-term health issues again and then in the past few days, finally finding a treatment that seems to be working.

I also write this

From the perspective of living abroad for the last two years, watching people in my country increasingly become sucked into polarizing narratives.

…and as someone who will inevitably have to deal with the challenges of race in America if I am lucky enough to become a father.

America, America, America.

As a white man in the US it has become a tricky time to say anything. The overwhelming pressures are to parrot popular political narratives or stay silent. The pressure to “take a stand” within the two political frames is overwhelming. Even many of my non American friends are amazed at how often they are asked where they stand on American issues.

 

Topics covered in this article include:

  • The political divide
  • Trauma and the body
  • Signs of hope

 

Read the full newsletter, Love Eats Politics for Breakfast, on the Boundless website.

 

 

Jeremy Greenberg’s company has published a report that shares insight and statistics into workplace diversity.

The research is clear that diversity in the workplace is good for both employers and employees.

Many prominent studies have found proven benefits of a more diverse work environment. These benefits include an increase in innovation, reduction in turnover, a higher level of creativity, and a more effective understanding of the needs of different market segments.

The corporate bottom line is affected as well. McKinsey reports that public companies with more diverse boards have higher levels of earnings.

Many large companies have diversity programs, which include the recruitment and development of women, racial minorities, and LGBTQ individuals. Homogeneous employment settings are now considered not merely a superficial public relations problem but a business effectiveness problem.

 

Areas covered in this article include:

  • The importance of role models
  • Underrepresentation in diversity baseline
  • The diversity divide by category
  • Diversity in digital media

 

Read the full article, Study Reveals Weak Diversity Among Key Role Models, on the Avenue Group website. 

 

 

Christy Johnson shares valuable insights from a survey of Seattle start-ups.

Most Seattle startups are very focused on the data—they rely heavily on data to drive product decisions. Seattle is home to Amazon and Microsoft, which have leveraged data to succeed in everything from retail, to cloud computing, software development and artificial intelligence. But it’s also home to non-technology companies like Starbucks, that are operating like technology companies and utilizing data to make their core business decisions.

Visionary technology companies like Apple, Facebook, Uber and Google  are establishing outposts in the Pacific Northwest (PNW)

Talent from Silicon Valley is migrating to the PNW because we have these innovative tech companies and a quality of life/cost of living that’s better than Silicon Valley

The PNW has consistently been criticized for not talking about social issues like race—and Silicon Valley companies have begun sharing diversity statistics with their communities, but few Seattle companies have followed suit

To understand what these facts meant for our startups culture, we surveyed more than 315+ employees at start-ups (defined as companies with fewer than 250 employees) in the Seattle area about their experience.

 

Read the results, including:

  • The issue diversity
  • Gender equality
  • What you can do

 

Read the full article, The Seattle Startup Survey Results are in…, on the Artemis Connection website.