Time Management

Time Management

David Hensley shares an article on management and leadership styles. 

We’ve observed – as we’re sure you have – that different managers and leaders have very different management/leadership styles. And that those styles don’t always fit the expectations of their organisations.

We’ve also noted that whilst the miscommunication and dysfunctionality that a mis-match causes in an organisation is a common topic for discussion, particularly around the water fountain or in the bar after work, there is typically little analytical discussion about the causes of this.

One of the reasons for this, we believe, is that there is little common vocabulary or taxonomy to use to discuss it, so it is difficult to categorize the presenting or expected leadership style.

Leadership of the Future

In some recent work we were doing, preparing for a speech on the Future of Leadership that Piret gave at the Brave World Conference in Tallinn in May 2018, we were influenced by the work of Simon Sinek, Frederic Laloux and others in describing future leadership as Purpose-driven. We contrasted this with the traditional Power-driven command and control model and the contemporary Performance-driven model. Each has a different objective set and a different management style.

We saw that these were actually three different paradigms of management/leadership, and realised that each one can be done effectively or ineffectively, and that the effectiveness depends on the socio-political environment as well as on the capabilities of the leader and on the alignment of the organisations’ people, policies and systems.

We then came to think – contrary to Laloux’s evolutionary model – that this is not a simple past-present-future sequence, but that the different paradigms have co-existed in different contexts over centuries.

 

Key points include:

  • Organization and culture
  • Changes over time
  • Moving forward

Read the full article, The 3 Management Paradigms, on HensleyPartners.com.

Alistair Hodgett shares a post that helps you end the week productively and get you ready for the weekend.

The end of the work week can be many things:

☐ The end of a period of work, consisting of achievements and difficulties

☐ A transition to leisure time, activities or time with family and friends

☐ A preparation for the next working week, making plans, lists or priorities

Each of these is worth observing to discover how you currently behave, and to assess whether there are things you would like to make part of a routine, things you would like to add or remove. If you are self-employed or an independent consultant (to paraphrase someone else) you make your own workplace.

The end of a period of work

The last call finished, the report sent to the client. You turn off the laptop and walk away without a care. Or perhaps you review what has been crossed off the to-do list (paper or electronic) and feel (depending on the week) satisfaction or despair? Your end of week can be changed by adopting a practice that ‘finishes on a high note’, like doing a small favour for someone else like making an introduction within your network, or sending a thank you. Or you can be more self-serving, and mark the end of the week with a LinkedIn post.

 

Key points include:

  • A transition to leisure time
  • Preparation for better work

Read the full post, How do you mark the end of your work week?, on LinkedIn.

 

Rahul Bhargava shares an article that identifies the need for intrapersonal intelligence in the workplace.

It is important to determine a person’s intelligence at the early stage of life. In doing so, they can receive proper guidance to achieve success in their respective fields. To enhance the intelligence we possess, intrapersonal intelligence plays a very crucial role. A person should follow a set of guidelines in his life to increasing productivity, concentration, and a positive outlook towards life. Intrapersonal intelligence speaks all about a man’s curiosity, critical thinking, introspection, self-reflectivity about any topic that interests them. But, before delving more into the study of intrapersonal intelligence, let us start with a story.

The story of David Reynolds

They are a part of our experiences as we grow up.

Reynolds is a 24-year old junior engineer working in a petrochemical plant. He is very sincere at his job and is on good terms with his colleagues and his boss. One day his boss called him into the office and the situation went something like this.

Boss: Hey Reynolds. Please have a seat. 

Reynolds: Hello sir. I heard you called me urgently. 

Boss: Yes, I did. It’s been almost a year that you are working for the company. You have always been a very dedicated engineer meeting your targets before the deadline. I even remember you received the best employee of the month in the first month of your joining itself.

Reynolds: Thank you very much sir. I have always tried to give my best when it comes to my work.

Boss: Sorry to inform you Reynolds but your last quarterly report speaks otherwise. It seems like you are not able to meet your target within the deadline for the past few weeks. I have also noticed that you are entering late in office often. Is there something you are worried about or this job doesn’t interest you anymore?

Reynolds: Sir, I can assure you that I am very dedicated to this company and there is nothing that you should worry about.

Boss: Well, your lack of interest and poor performance is currently worrying me very much. I don’t want to be harsh on you but you should understand even if I work under someone as well. If you can’t meet the target deadline I am answerable to someone and I am not going to be held responsible for someone else’s incompetence. You are good employee Reynolds, don’t fail me next time. Get back to work.

 

Key points include:

  • Time management
  • The different kinds of intelligences
  • Why it’s important to develop intrapersonal skills

 

Read the full article, How to develop strong Intrapersonal Intelligence?, on purplecrest.co.

 

 

Maintaining productivity for you and your team is not always easy, but despair not; David A. Fields provides a list of productivity questions designed to make you assess, address, and activate a productivity system.

Puff your chest out and strike a superhero pose. You’re Super Productivity Person! Sigh, that’s not very catchy is it?

Also, to be fair, probably neither you nor your consulting firm are achieving legendary productivity day in and day out. You could, though, using the approach outlined below.

Productivity isn’t as sexy a superpower as x-ray vision*, stretchy skin, or spidey senses.*

On the other hand, sky-high productivity feels pretty darn good and rewards you and your consulting firm with high profits, meaningful work, and enviable work/life balance.

So, how do you step up to the Mt. Olympus of productivity?

If you run a quick search on time management and productivity techniques, you’ll surface dozens of approaches. (Hover your mouse here to see some examples.)

It turns out that virtually all of the many, many productivity approaches and systems are built to help you answer a handful of basic questions.

 

Key points in this article include:

  • The Basic Productivity Questions
  • The More Important Productivity Questions
  • The Superhero Productivity Question

 

Read the full article, How To Make Yourself And Your Consulting Firm Super Productive, and access the questions, on David’s website.

 

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Zac Peake with Constratego Ltd.  Zac Peake has broad consulting and corporate experience, with work that spans strategy development, growth planning, performance improvement, cost reduction, organisation design, and transformation / change for a mix of consumer and retail, financial services, and private equity clients.

Zac has worked at Booz & Company (Consumer and Retail practice), The Parthenon Group (commercial due diligence) as well as independent consulting. Zac’s previous corporate work includes roles as strategy director at Mitchells & Butlers and marketing / growth director at PE backed A-Plan Insurance.

Zac lives in Cambridgeshire, UK.  In his free time Zac plays board and card games, listens to audio books and podcasts, snowboards, and strives to occasionally produce a half decent watercolour painting.