Team Performance

Team Performance

 

Luiz Zorzella shares an article that identifies key insights for improving a service team’s performance and results.

If your firm is organized around service teams, you may find that understanding and managing their contribution is difficult.

It is not easy because it depends on several logic leaps that sound intuitive but are opaque.

For example, you may set goals and even reward them for keeping the clients in their portfolio happy. You may achieve this through a combination of client satisfaction surveys (e.g. “how happy are you with our services?”) and management assessments (“I think clients are happy with Sam”).

However, are you sure you measure the right things? And are you sure the weight of these factors is commensurate with their real importance to your business and your clients?

Intuitively, service teams should make their clients happy (and I am not saying otherwise). 

However, how does happiness compare with cross-sales?

To answer these questions, you should take a closer look at the contribution of your service teams.

There are three crucial ways service teams produce financial results to your company:

They provide services to their clients efficiently.  

Clients pay for services.  

The income produced by these clients for services by the end of a year minus their variable costs is the contribution of that service team to the company.

 They also reduce attrition and risk.

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • Setting goals and defining priorities 
  • Defining the starting point of the pool for incentives
  • Understanding and managing KPIs

 

Read the full article, How To Have Value Indicators For Your Service Team, on Amquant.com

 

 

Shane Heywood takes a look at how the Direct to Consumer business model could have meaningful implications for social enterprises. 

My earliest shaving experience was around the age of 13. After 10 minutes, reeling from irritation everywhere, and minimal hair in the sink, I also felt slightly cheated by how much I had spent on the razor.

Apparently, that feeling has helped to lead to a $1 Bn USD deal.

Across some consumer-facing industries, from shaving cream to mattresses to prescription glasses, a direct to consumer – plus (DTC+) model is leaving an indelible imprint in the Consumer Goods industry, delighting consumers and disappointing long-standing players with equal effect.

The Dollar Shaving Club, which provides members with razors and other personal care products, is one of the more prominent firms showing the DTC model; however Casper and Eve mattresses are other examples, and Warby Parker, providing glasses.

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • The Direct to Consumer (DTC) business model
  • DTC and Social impact

 

Read the full article, Dollar Shaving Club and Social Enterprises: Can one learn from the other?, on Shane’s website.