team building

team building

Anubhav Raina shares an evergreen post on building trust using the steps of supply chain management as a guide. 

Trust is a vague term & people use it in different contexts.

One good definition I’ve come across: “Trust is an individual’s ability to accept risk based on his or her expectations of another person’s behaviour.” (Source: www.ricklindquist.com)

Thus, the aim in building trust should be to increase the counterparty’s risk-tolerance.

But remember- risk tolerance (by its very nature) is rooted in our evolutionary journey.

Using the SCM model, we can predict that risk-tolerance (aka trust) be earned by focussing on things that matter from an evolutionary POV as well.

To refresh your memory, there are three behaviours we discussed that arise from our collective evolutionary journeys:

  1. Creation of sense of self-worth
  2. Creation of in-groups, out-groups & anti-groups
  3. Obsession with gathering more resources

This particular article will lay out a framework for building trust through a focus on the last two behaviours. I.e., by demonstrating emotional resonance (tied to in-groups) & competence (tied to ability to gather resources).

 

Key points include:

  • Using effective questioning
  • Expanding the size of the pie
  • Negotiation: sweetening the deal

Read the full article, Building Trust using SCM, on Medium.

 

Joana Domingues explains how a strong tactic of team leadership may be to admit when you need help.

Every time I do it, it’s magical. And yet, I refrain. After all, I’ve spent a life showing myself strong and helpful, capable of dealing with anything you throw at me, and with composure and a smile (without asking for help). Isn’t that the definition of “very professional”? Well… it surely has its merits, and I’ve found it’s also a recipe for my exhaustion. My “invincibility armour” creates separation, does not let help in. At the same time, it may also limit the capacity of others to ask for help, afraid of displaying their own vulnerabilities and needs.

Interestingly, when I do recognize “I’m tired”, or “I have too much on my plate”, help seems to magically unfold my way, new possibilities and choices emerge. I feel lighter, more supported, in this together. It’s a muscle I am learning to strengthen – and for me it might be a lifelong journey.

I see my “strong-alone-exhausted” pattern in many of the executives and teams we are coaching. Often overwhelmed with work, focused on delivering the load ‘on their own plate’, they don’t stop to acknowledge their own weaknesses and limits, to share what is hard, where they could use some help.

 

Key points identified in this article include:

  • How vulnerability builds trust and cooperation
  • Executive patterns
  • Checking impulses 

 

Read the full article, How showing vulnerability helps build a stronger team: exactly when it’s harder, on LinkedIn.

 

This post from Jeremy Greenberg’s company blog identifies five lessons that CEOs can learn from Howard Stern.

Howard Stern has been one of the most controversial entertainers since he hosted his first radio show over 40 years ago. Love him or hate him, he has enjoyed a successful career thus far – building his brand into an empire worth over $600 million as well as transforming the landscape of terrestrial and satellite radio. Stern’s success can teach us a lot about business. The following are five lessons that CEOs can learn from Howard Stern.

The five lessons covered in the post are:

1.Be authentic

2.Build a strong, diverse team

3. Balance work and life

4. Pivot naturally

5. Always be curious

Here is the lesson on building a strong, diverse team:

Howard Stern is not a one-man show. “I’m at my best when I have a bunch of people around me, when I can call on them and collaborate,” he explains. Stern’s core nucleus of co-host Robin Quivers, sound effects wizard Fred Norris, and producer Gary Dell’Abate has been working with him since 1984. Quivers plays the straight woman, Norris rarely speaks, and Dell’Abate runs things behind the scenes. They all differ from Stern in every way, but work together to make a great team. Three different people with different strengths and weaknesses, doing different jobs.
As you build your team, focus on hiring people who are not like you, but make sure they are people that you like. Diverse work and personal experience, philosophies, and talents are essential to building your company.
In fact, studies have found that a work environment that is more diverse causes a decrease in turnover and an increase in productivity. Just remember, you will have to work with these folks, so make sure you can get along with them so that they remain on the team for the long haul.

 

 

Read the full article, Beyond Baba Booey: 5 Business Lessons CEOs Can Learn From Howard Stern, on the website of Avenue Group.