Team alignment

Team alignment

In this post, Jessica Lackey identifies the five costs of misalignment and what you can do about it. 

It can be easy to stay super busy by taking action in our lives and businesses. #productivity #hustleculture

But if the actions we are taking are not aligned to our deepest blueprint, our inner knowing, then we aren’t truly operating in our highest gifts that will transform our revenue and results. We might be treading water, or “wasting time”, instead of being laser-focused on what will drive traction.

And acting with misalignment comes at a cost. More specifically, 5 costs.

Missed Revenue

Knowing who you are and being aligned with how you serve in your business is the key to revenue, both for new fans and returning customers.

Are you meant for deep work with a few clients? Or are you meant for creating a large and expansive platform?

In retail, are you known for higher-end, exquisite experiences? Or being able to replicate quickly at scale?

Do you love to teach? Or do you thrive on making and mastery and deliver hands-on, “done-for-you” service?

 

Key points include:

  • Wasted busy time
  • Missing your “Dream Team”
  • Exhaustion and burnout

Read the full article, The 5 Costs of Misalignment, on LinkedIn.

 

Xavier Lederer shares a purposeful post that offers practical steps that can be taken to maximize the efficacy of meetings when the goal is executing the priorities of a strategy.

Many of us hate meetings. Many regular meetings are boring and ineffective indeed. They don’t have the right agenda (or no agenda at all), are not well facilitated, and don’t accomplish much.

Yet the right meetings lead to faster and better decision-making, increase accountability throughout the organization, and improve communication. In short: efficient meetings get your quarterly priorities accomplished. Together with aligning your leadership team around the top 2 to 3 quarterly priorities and measuring what matters, implementing a consistent meeting and communication rhythm enables you to focus and execute on your strategic plan.

How do you go from boring meetings to impactful meetings? Start with a good planning and communication rhythm with your leadership team, which ideally includes 5 meetings:

  • Daily huddle.
  • Weekly accountability meeting.
  • Monthly check-in and education session.
  • Quarterly planning and education session.
  • Annual planning retreat.

Each of these meetings has a different goal with a different agenda. The key is to maintain the discipline to stick to the agenda and the goal of each meeting. When you do not, meetings get too long, become ineffective, and people start skipping them. For example: While it can be tempting to discuss strategic changes in a daily or weekly meeting, this is not the right place: table this until your next quarterly meeting.

 

Key points include:

  • Synchronizing the team
  • Moving the strategy forward
  • Aligning key priorities

 

Read the full post, Meeting rhythm: the key to consistently executing on your strategic priorities, on ambrosegrowth.com.

 

 

In this post, Dan Markovitz identifies the weak spots in  productivity hacks and explains why they don’t work.

Leaders in organizations are always seeking to improve employee productivity (including their own). All too often, that quest goes no further than time management training provided by the HR department. Those classes cover the pros and cons of Inbox Zero, the Pomodoro technique, the Eisenhower matrix, Getting Things Done, and countless other approaches that tantalize us with visions of the promised land of peak productivity. Given that people are still overwhelmed by work, buried in email, and unable to focus on critical priorities, it’s safe to say that these productivity hacks don’t hack it. 

The problem isn’t with the intrinsic logic of any of these approaches. It’s that they fail to account for the simple fact that most people don’t work in isolation. They work in complex organizations defined by interdependencies among people—and it’s these interdependencies that have the greatest effect on personal productivity. You can be an email ninja, but with the explosion of email (not to mention instant messages, Twitter direct messages, Slack messages, and countless other communication tools), you’ll never be fast enough to deal with all the incoming communication. Similarly, your personal urgent/important Eisenhower categories fall apart when the CEO asks you to do stop what you’re doing and handle something right now. 

As legendary statistician and management consultant W. Edwards Deming argued in his book Out of the Crisis, 94% of most problems and possibilities for improvement belong to the system, not the individual. I would argue that most productivity improvements belong there as well. Personal productivity systems are certainly useful, but the most effective antidote to low productivity and inefficiency must be implemented at the system level, not the individual level.

 

Four countermeasures to systemic overload include:

  • Tackling tiered daily huddles
  • Enabling an equitable distribution of work
  • Defining the “bat signal”
  • Aligning responsibility with authority

 

Read the full article, Why Your Productivity Hacks Don’t Hack It, on MarkovitzConsulting.com. 

 

 

In this podcast,Tineke Keesmaat interviews Dr. Elsbeth Johnson who shares her ground-breaking research on how leaders and managers can achieve successful strategic change in their organizations. 

Big, strategic change efforts often fail. Virtually all of them are harder than they need to be. Why is this and what can leaders do to make change stick? 

Leaders must learn to step up in the early stages of an organizational change, and then step back in its later stages. This combination sets up the managers and teams for success when delivering the change.  

Strategic change isn’t a Hollywood film. It’s not fast, dramatic or easy. Instead, it’s about doing the “non-glam” work of putting in place the right elements to set managers and teams up for success.  

A leader’s charisma is not enough to sustain long-term change. While charisma can play an important role – particularly at the start of a change program, too much of it for too long can breed dependency in managers and teams that will inhibit true transformations.   

In the context of Covid-19, leaders may need to focus more on operations and execution in the near term. But, they also need to do more to provide clarity and to align their teams around their vision and priorities.

 

Key points include:

  • Stepping up and stepping back
  • Sustaining long-term change
  • Aligning teams around vision and priorities

 

Listen to the podcast, A New Approach For Leaders To Deliver Successful Strategic Change, on Tiltco.ca. 

 

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Yevgeniy Rikhterman.  Yevgeniy Rikhterman spent three years as the Director of Strategy at Herff Jones, a PE owned CPG company. Yevgeniy has experience in creating strategic plans, as well as an evergreen strategic planning processes. Yevgeniy led the strategic planned that helped to maximize the value of Herff Jones during a critical PE transaction.

He also led the corporate development, and M&A aspect, and as such has specific experiences that is applicable to mid-size companies looking to grow through partnerships and acquisitions. In addition, he led multiple product transformations, and is experienced in not only understanding root causes, but also guiding the implementation of the solution. Prior to Herff Jones Yevgeniy spent two years as a consultant at the Boston Consulting Group (BCG), working on a variety of projects in finance, retail, pharmaceuticals, telecom, industrial goods, and aviation.

Yevgeniy lives in New York City, and when not working enjoys travelling around the world, and outdoor activities. He is happy to work projects globally.