Talent Management

Talent Management

In this article, Jared Simmons identifies the difference between intelligence and wisdom and how understanding the difference may improve talent management. 

In large organizations, the nature of the work creates a natural tendency toward complexity. And as a leader, it can be very tempting to advance those who seem to have the intelligence to manage it. But complexity is not a symptom to be managed while you work–it is often the work itself. Its symptoms are a lack of a clear purpose, inconsistent strategy, slow execution, low morale, and missed opportunities. It takes wisdom to see the deeper issues in these situations.

The difference between intelligence and wisdom

Intelligence is the ability to adapt to and solve new mental challenges. Whether it is a crossword puzzle or a 5-year strategic plan is irrelevant–intelligence focuses on solving the problem. Wisdom focuses on meeting the highest need in a given situation, which sometimes means doing the simpler, less complex, more effective thing. Wisdom is about asking the right questions; intelligence is about having the right answers.

Why focusing on wisdom is hard

Hiring smart people requires a leader to sharpen her focus on the wisdom of the team’s actions, which takes humility. Organizations are made up of smart people who are struggling with the unconscious tension between the right answer for the organization and the answer that serves their career. That’s what makes external perspective so valuable.

Consultants aren’t necessarily smarter than your VPs and SVPs–they’re simply less invested in the status quo. It goes against human nature to recommend steps that cause us harm–physical, emotional, reputational. As a result, employees sometimes (often unconsciously) use their intelligence to craft a solution that minimizes personal losses while inching the organization forward instead of maximizing organizational progress. Smart people who are rewarded and compensated by the system have one more constraint than those who are not.

Key points include:

  • The difficulty of focusing on wisdom
  • The difference between wisdom and intelligence
  • The possibilities ahead

Read the full article, Wisdom, Intelligence, and Talent Management, on OutlastLLC.com.

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Marcia Spitalney Nuffer with BlueShor.  Marcia Nuffer spent 21 years at McKinsey. For roughly the first half, Marcia was a strategy consultant focused on helping organizations realize their business goals through organizational change and leadership development. In 2003, Marcia became McKinsey’s Chief Learning Officer. In this role, Marcia was responsible for building one of the most lauded global leadership development programs in the world and leading strategic people initiatives for the firm.

Today, Marcia has her own consulting firm, BlueShor, focusing on leadership and talent development, executive coaching, and people strategy. While serving companies and nonprofits of any size, Marcia has a particular interest in manager development at high growth companies.

Marcia is happy to collaborate on projects related to leadership and talent development – both strategically and programmatically – and talent strategy. She is also open to executive and team coaching opportunities. While Marcia’s major focus is the Atlanta area, her long-term global experience and the possibilities of remote work enable her to collaborate internationally as well.

 

Ben Dattner co wrote this article for Harvard Business Review on the issue of building ethical AI for talent management. 

Artificial intelligence has disrupted every area of our lives — from the curated shopping experiences we’ve come to expect from companies like Amazon and Alibaba to the personalized recommendations that channels like YouTube and Netflix use to market their latest content. But, when it comes to the workplace, in many ways, AI is still in its infancy. This is particularly true when we consider the ways it is beginning to change talent management. To use a familiar analogy: AI at work is in the dial-up mode. The 5G WiFi phase has yet to arrive, but we have no doubt that it will.

 

Areas covered in this article include:

  • Training data sets
  • Efficient predictions on a candidate
  • Bias and creating homogeneity in organizations

 

Read the full article, Building Ethical AI for Talent Management, on the Harvard Business Review.