strategic transformation

strategic transformation

A concise post on transformation from Carsten Friedrichs.

“Transformation Key Success Factors number 2: If you are not among the first, you react quickly and consistently.

You can’t be at the forefront of every topic. No organization can provide that much human and financial capacity. You can be very successful in the role of a fast follower. After all, it is enough that the wheel was invented once. But this includes being attentive and open and recognizing the important trends and impulses. You shouldn’t be afraid to take over the bike, even if it’s “not invented here”.

In order to react quickly and consistently, to be a real fast follower, you have to be able to provide personnel and financial capacities at short notice.”

Access the post, # 2 – If You Aren’t One Of The First, You React Quickly And Consistently, on Hardt-Group.com.

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Duncan Mitchell with OCC Business Services.  Duncan Mitchell spent over 6 years at McKinsey focused on the Energy practice. He specialises in transformation/turnaround and has been running his own consulting firm since 2016. Duncan has broad experience, first as a Chemical Engineer at the leading petroleum technology licensor, UOP and also in operations improvement at Arcelor Mittal – the world’s largest steel company. Functionally Duncan specialises in post-merger integration, performance measurement and management and strategic transformation through acquisition or restructuring.

He lives in Chicago IL by the airport and is happy to travel as necessary to serve clients.

 

Jared Simmons provides a concise post that identifies the three most common factors that impede progress. 

Whether you are chasing profit or purpose, a team’s ability to make progress is critical to achieving its objectives. There are many obstacles that keep a team from operating at its full potential, but the three most common (and solvable) ones are ambiguity, apathy, and amateurism. The challenge is recognizing them in action.

 

Discover how the following three A’s impact your team:

  • Ambiguity
  • Apathy
  • Amateurism

 

Read the full post on the, Making progress: The three silent killers, on the Outlast website. 

 

 

Stephen Wunker explores the emotional connection in marketing and how this connection can be applied to Jobs to be Done to lay out pathways for creating targeted, meaningful, and relevant innovations.

The modern Mini Cooper—offered in a variety of eye-popping colors—burst onto the scene in 2001 as a chic version of an old British classic. It quickly became a fixture in trendy urban neighborhoods around the globe. Today, nearly twenty years later, the car still hasn’t lost its freshness: demand for Minis has remained robust with annual sales increasing at a steady pace of 5.2% per year.

On paper, the Mini doesn’t look like it should be such a break-out success. While its modest size makes it ideal for city living, other cars such as the Honda Fit or the Chevy Sonic are equally manageable in tight quarters. The Mini’s Comfort ratings in the Kelley Blue Book are tied with those of the VW Beetle and Toyota Yaris. Its gas mileage is no better than its competitors’, and sometimes it is worse. And with a sticker price that averages about $5,000 more than comparably sized rivals, the case for buying a Mini seems pretty weak.

The Mini’s surprising success comes from its unique, almost ineffable customer appeal. People just feel good about buying one.

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • Figuring out emotions
  • Quantifying emotional jobs
  • The hierarchy of emotions

 

Read the full article, Measuring Emotional Jobs To Be Done, on the Branding Strategy Insider website.