Strategic Alignment

Strategic Alignment

 

Priyanka Ghosh shares a case study on the strategic alignment of leadership teams.

SITUATION

In the course of driving a growth program for a family-owned European industrial manufacturer, it quickly became clear that the dysfunctional leadership team was a bottleneck to progress. Although the team was composed of capable individuals with impressive track records, the ten team members were unable to agree on a coherent strategy and continued to revisit the same issues. The various departments seemed poorly informed about business activities outside their siloes and they were particularly confused about how cross-functional decisions should be made. Gonzalo, the CEO, found himself in constantly firefighting to solve operational issues and placate disgruntled workers. Gonzalo approached ProMelior to bring order and efficiency to the leadership team before the growth program could go ahead.

DIAGNOSTIC

ProMelior began by building a fact-base on how the leadership team was interacting. We explored three key questions:

How often did the team meet and what was the nature of the interaction?

The team was spread across several geographies and rarely met in person as a full group. In the scheduled twice-monthly meetings, there was frequently more than 30% absenteeism, even among phone participants. When the meetings did occur, they were mostly used to resolve operational issues that involved 2-3 groups but which were irrelevant to the majority of participants.

How were key decisions being made?

Important commercial decisions were usually made by Gonzalo, the CFO, and the Head of the largest Business Unit in ad hoc meetings that Gonzalo would typically convene. Decisions regarding operations, HR policies and other functional matters were usually made by the CEO and the relevant functional leader. Once decisions were made, they were rarely communicated in a structured manner across the leadership team, let alone across the organization.

How was strategy developed?

Most of the leadership team believed the company had no strategy. They understood a clear imperative from the top to growing existing revenues streams to achieve aggressive annual targets. However, there was no common understanding about how the organization was going to achieve these targets.

 

Access the case study, Strategic Alignment of Leadership Teams, on Promelier.co.uk. 

 

 

Priyanka Ghosh shares a case study for services provided to a family-owned European industrial manufacturer that was struggling with leadership issues. 

In the course of driving a growth program for a family-owned European industrial manufacturer, it quickly became clear that the dysfunctional leadership team was a bottleneck to progress. Although the team was composed of capable individuals with impressive track records, the ten team members were unable to agree on a coherent strategy and continued to revisit the same issues. The various departments seemed poorly informed about business activities outside their silos and they were particularly confused about how cross-functional decisions should be made. Gonzalo, the CEO, found himself in constantly firefighting to solve operational issues and placate disgruntled workers. Gonzalo approached ProMelior to bring order and efficiency to the leadership team before the growth program could go ahead.

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • The situation
  • The diagnostic
  • The solution

 

Access the case study, Strategic Alignment of Leadership Teams, on the Promelior website.

 

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Thomas Steiner with Steiner Advisory.  Tom Steiner combines eight years as a leader in industry with four years of consulting experience, at McKinsey and as an independent. He has served in roles including Sr. Director, Corporate Strategy; Head of Supply Chain; and in various hands-on operational positions where he has led up to 400 people. Tom is particularly passionate about leading transformational change programs for clients.  He has functional expertise in supply chain, operations, strategy, and M&A integration; and is focused on clients in industries including energy, industrials, technology, manufacturing, and private equity.

Tom lives in Houston, Texas with his wife and three daughters

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Brad Sostack. Brad Sostack spent two years in McKinsey’s operations practice and has over 15 years of leadership experience in transformation strategy, operational planning and execution, and change management. Brad served in the United States Navy as an enlisted technician and as an officer specializing in the operations and maintenance of nuclear submarines.

He holds a Masters’ of Business Administration from the University of Florida and Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from Oregon State University. Brad lives in St. Petersburg, Florida with his wife, Lana. He is currently an independent consultant where he has worked with clients in retail, manufacturing and aerospace/defense

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Christian Frank with Redwood Wellness Partners. Christian Frank spent 8 years at McKinsey in Germany (Automotive, Operations, Sales and Marketing) and the US (HighTech, Healthcare, IT).  After working at IBM in corporate strategy, SMB strategy and Healthcare Business Process Outsourcing he joined ADP as head of corporate strategy and employer services marketing.  Following ADP he founded an employee wellness screening company and has been working as an independent consultant for the past 8 years.

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Eric Hiller to our community.  Eric is the managing partner of Hiller Associates, the leading consulting firm specializing in product cost management (PCM), should-cost, design-to-value and software product management.

He is a former McKinsey & Company engagement manager and operations expert. Before McKinsey, Mr. Hiller was the co-founder and founding CEO of two high technology start-ups: aPriori (a PCM software platform) and TADA.today. Before aPriori & TADA, he worked in product development and manufacturing at Ford Motor Co., John Deere, and Procter & Gamble.

Mr. Hiller is the author of the PCM blog www.ProductProfitAndRisk.com. He holds an MBA from the Harvard Business School and a master’s and bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.