Social enterprise

Social enterprise

 

Caroline Taich shares the second installment of a two-part series on social sector partnerships. 

In a recent blog post I began exploring the question of how to take social sector partnerships from good to great.  We looked at data showing that employers can increase their investment in environmental, social, and governance sustainability.

I now explore the role of non-profits.  By adapting planning, messaging, and reporting with employers, I believe non-profits can achieve greater outcomes.  This hypothesis stems from my own experience across 20 years of consulting with dozens of employers, non-profits, and government offices.  I increasingly see non-profits articulate their value proposition on their terms and share it in search of new or renewed funding sources – but they are often overlooked by employers, who don’t see the direct connection to their own objectives.

We can do better.  Non-profits and employers need to see themselves as partners, working together to make progress on the issues that matter to both.  Here are a few practices that I am working on:

Understand your purpose. Increasingly, as part of the strategic planning that I facilitate, I help leadership teams align on their Purpose. Clarity of purpose helps you communicate the difference you make in a deeper and more meaningful way.

 

Read the full article, How Can We Take Social Sector Partnerships from Good to Great? (part 2), on KirtlandConsulting.com.

 

 

Caroline Taich provides a concise post from her website that is the first in a series of two articles that explores how to improve social sector partnerships.

One component of the question lies in the role of employers.  Intuitively I think we can agree that employers have much to gain from healthy, vibrant communities. But how much should employers invest? And what form should the investment take?

The 2020 SustainAbility Leaders Survey by GlobeScan of 701 sustainability experts across 71 countries can shed some light on the question.  First of all, the survey indicates that the need for sustainability development is more urgent now than ever.  Experts perceive that the urgency of sustainable development challenges is rising across the board – ALL issues tracked in this survey increased in importance since last year.

Challenges on the urgent list include environmental (e.g., climate change #1 and biodiversity loss #2), economic (e.g., poverty #6, economic inequality #7)  and social (e.g., access to quality education #9 and access to quality healthcare #10).

Furthermore, the experts are underwhelmed with the current level of investment borne by employers.  Only 17% of experts feel that employers are doing an “excellent” job addressing sustainable development.

The biggest rationale for employer sustainability development put forth in this survey is resiliency.  The survey draws a connection between internal & external community investment and the very livelihood of the employer itself.

 

Read the full article, How Can We Take Social Sector Partnerships from Good to Great? (part 1),  on KirtlandConsulting.com. 

 

 

Belinda Li shares an article that summarizes the key findings from this year’s Social Enterprise World Forum and provides links to more information on each social enterprise solution.

This past September, CiTTA Partnership was thrilled to engage in Social Enterprise World Forum (SEWF) Digital, the world’s first virtual global social enterprise conference. The event had 94 live sessions and masterclasses, attended by over 5,000 participants from over 50 countries spanning all time zones of the globe. The 200 speakers highlighted timely topics within the social enterprise sphere including innovation in job creation, navigating the impact of COVID-19, alternative funding models, youth-led social enterprises, and social enterprises as influencers. There were many notable moments of wisdom during the five-day event. Policy and Research Director, Kate Bailey of Eco-Cycle in Colorado, invited participants to reflect on how to recognize ecosystem gaps and opportunities to tackle waste and challenged leaders to use the social enterprise model to create employment opportunities, educate the public on how to slow down consumption and be more conscious about how we consume, and live more sustainably.

In the panel “Creating a Social Value Marketplace,” Arielle Johnson from Fierce Staffing in Detroit remarked that social enterprises can be more inclusive by offering equity to their employees to create intentionality and a pathway for upward mobility. Audrey Tang, Taiwan’s Digital Minister, shared innovative insights on how we can use humor to combat misinformation about COVID-19 and that inclusiveness is about seeing everyone’s opinion with equal importance.

 

Key topics highlighted include:

  • Ecosystem gaps and opportunities
  • Inclusivity and inequality 
  • Helping prisoners return to the workforce

 

Read the full article, Elevating Society Through Conscious Business: Our Global Discussion on the Impact of Social Enterprises at SEWF Digital 2020, on LinkedIn. 

 

 

Belinda Li shares an article that explores the meaning of ‘social’ in social enterprise.

When I tell people our consulting firm has a passion for helping social enterprises, I’m sometimes met with the question, ‘what do you mean by social enterprise?’

Or I might get a knowing look, yet the response is, ‘oh, so you do social media!’ or ‘oh, so it’s about social networking!’ Hmm…

I suppose that’s not totally unexpected. After all, not many people know about ‘social enterprise.’ And today, the word ‘social’ is frequently associated with ‘social media / social networking.’ At a recent event hosted by a social media firm, they said things like: ‘today we are all things social’ or ‘everything is social now!’ When substituting ‘social’ for ‘social media,’ everyone understood what they meant. The confusion is further exacerbated by articles such as this one. You’ll see it has ‘creating a social enterprise’ in its title… and yet the article is all about social media!”

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • What a social enterprise is
  • How social enterprises differ from most businesses
  • Examples of social enterprise

 

Read the full article, When “Social” Means More, on LinkedIn.

 

 

Shane Heywood takes a look at how the Direct to Consumer business model could have meaningful implications for social enterprises. 

My earliest shaving experience was around the age of 13. After 10 minutes, reeling from irritation everywhere, and minimal hair in the sink, I also felt slightly cheated by how much I had spent on the razor.

Apparently, that feeling has helped to lead to a $1 Bn USD deal.

Across some consumer-facing industries, from shaving cream to mattresses to prescription glasses, a direct to consumer – plus (DTC+) model is leaving an indelible imprint in the Consumer Goods industry, delighting consumers and disappointing long-standing players with equal effect.

The Dollar Shaving Club, which provides members with razors and other personal care products, is one of the more prominent firms showing the DTC model; however Casper and Eve mattresses are other examples, and Warby Parker, providing glasses.

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • The Direct to Consumer (DTC) business model
  • DTC and Social impact

 

Read the full article, Dollar Shaving Club and Social Enterprises: Can one learn from the other?, on Shane’s website.

 

Odin Muhlenbein and his colleagues co-authored an article that explains how social enterprises are solving the problem of youth unemployment in Africa. 

The issues that are the most pressing today will shape the legacies of the most powerful African political and business leaders of our time.

For the continent, the youth population boom and issues of employment are at the top of the list of priorities. Leaders at national, continental and global levels discuss these topics in the halls of the United Nations, the African Union and within talent-strapped businesses operating in the region. When it comes to the political and economic agendas of a continent dubbed “the most youthful” and projected to become the home of half of the world’s youth population by 2040, the “youth bulge” and the unemployment statistics inform the entire dialogue. Clearly, there is need for urgency, action and collaboration to create sustainable impact on a large scale.

 

This article includes approaches applied by leading social entrepreneurs in Africa to address the issue. 

 

Read the full article, Learning from social enterprises: How to solve youth unemployment in Africa, on the Devex website.

Jennifer Hartz shares a story of a wise investment, socially and economically, and shows how banks and other funds can support projects like these and earn a meaningful financial return.

 

Shamrock Gardens is the brainchild of Brent Sobol.  It’s the manifestation of his career in multi-family properties and his Jesuit faith, an order of the Roman Catholic Church, established in the 1500’s.  The affordable supportive apartment complex is in one of the most challenging areas on the south side of Atlanta and is home to 900 residents – with a waiting list to get in.  Further, this is a wise investment!  Banks and other funds can support projects like these and earn a meaningful financial return.

 

Read the full article, Magic on Plaza Lane: A Lesson in Multi-Family Real Estate, on the Corporate Hartz website.