Podcast

Podcast

Amanda Setili shares how she started her podcast Fearless Growth with a little help from her friends and what she learned in the process. 

When my podcast guest Ginger (Virginia) Bowman was a waitress right out of college, she went to see Jurassic Park and instantly had the desire to create animated imagery like the creatures in that movie. Although she lacked any training or knowledge relevant to the entertainment industry, Ginger started telling anyone who would listen, “That’s what I want to do.”

And people helped. A fellow worker helped her acquire computer animation software, and Ginger began self-training after work each day. A few months later, a customer heard her dream and connected her with an internship. Ginger interned during the day, worked as a waitress in the evening, then practiced with the software into the early morning hours.

Before long, she landed a job with Sony Imageworks, where she voiced a desire to lead a team as technical director and was promoted in record time. Ginger went on to win four Oscars on those teams, working in the creative departments of Hollywood blockbusters including Spiderman, Chronicles of Narnia, Superman Returns, Aviator, Stuart Little, Castaway and Matrix Reloaded. 

This reminded me about one of life’s best lessons, which is: decide what you want, and tell other people. It’s the habit that often separates highly successful talented people from unsuccessful talented people.

Key podcasts include:

  • Greg White
  • Mitali Chopra
  • Sandra Hughes

 

Read the full article, What I Learned by Becoming a Podcast Host, on LinkedIn.

Indranil Ghosh has launched a new podcast where he unpacks the success stories from his network of champions in impact business.

For over a decade, I have been working companies which have made a material impact on the environment, on human health, and on social equality—while also returning extraordinary financial returns to shareholders along the way.

Each week starting August 10th, I will unpack the success stories of entrepreneurial champions from my network, digging deep to find the winning practices that listeners can use in their own ventures and ESG investment portfolios.

Guests will include Javier Cavada, President and CEO of Highview Power, who will talk about the company’s pioneering CRYOBattery which is pushing the frontiers of energy storage. Highview offers a clean, cost-competitive solution to store energy at grid scale for hours and even days—much longer than Li-ion batteries which are suited for 1-2 hours of storage.

I will also be talking to Glen Martin who will introduce his fourth venture Hyox Space—an exciting new venture with a blueprint to revolutionize aviation and ground transportation with clean hydrogen at a lower cost that today’s carbon-based fuels.

There are many exciting discussions to look forward to. I hope you will tune in every week on Acast, Apple iTunes, Google Podcasts, Spotify or your favourite podcast channel. 

 

Recent episodes include:

  • Clean Hydrogen for Transportation, featuring Infrastructure Innovator & Aerospace Engineer, Glen Martin
  • The Food-Energy-Waste Circular Economy, featuring President and Chairman of Empire State Greenhouses, Louis Ferro
  • Building a Climate Impact Investment Platform, with Founder & Managing Partner at Greenbackers Investment Capital, Robert Hokin

 

For more details, check out the Impact Unicorns website at www.impact-unicorns.com.

 

 

David A. Fields shares a few key tips on promoting your services through a podcast in the best possible way.

Podcasts are (relatively) easy to produce, the barrier to entry is virtually zero, and they’ve become more popular than cabbage patch dolls in the 1980s. Should your consulting firm have a podcast? Probably. Can you leverage the podcast movement to your consulting firm’s advantage? Absolutely.

My consulting firm can trace a substantial portion of our revenues to podcasts. Your firm can enjoy this success too.*

Your consulting firm’s podcast strategy can be bifurcated based on your position: are you the host or are you a guest?

HOST – Use your consulting firm’s podcast to create deep relationships.

GUEST – Use partners’ podcasts to create broad interest in your consulting firm.

You’ll find that being a guest is a far easier, less expensive, more sustainable path to gaining clients for your consulting firm. So, for this article, let’s focus on being a guest!*

Promoting your consulting firm through guest appearances is easy:

 

Key points include:

  • Finding partners
  • Being a memorable guest
  • Adding value for listeners

 

Read the full article, How To Promote Your Consulting Firm On Podcasts (Without Being Boring Or Annoying), on DavidAFields.com.

 

 

In this podcast,Tineke Keesmaat interviews Dr. Elsbeth Johnson who shares her ground-breaking research on how leaders and managers can achieve successful strategic change in their organizations. 

Big, strategic change efforts often fail. Virtually all of them are harder than they need to be. Why is this and what can leaders do to make change stick? 

Leaders must learn to step up in the early stages of an organizational change, and then step back in its later stages. This combination sets up the managers and teams for success when delivering the change.  

Strategic change isn’t a Hollywood film. It’s not fast, dramatic or easy. Instead, it’s about doing the “non-glam” work of putting in place the right elements to set managers and teams up for success.  

A leader’s charisma is not enough to sustain long-term change. While charisma can play an important role – particularly at the start of a change program, too much of it for too long can breed dependency in managers and teams that will inhibit true transformations.   

In the context of Covid-19, leaders may need to focus more on operations and execution in the near term. But, they also need to do more to provide clarity and to align their teams around their vision and priorities.

 

Key points include:

  • Stepping up and stepping back
  • Sustaining long-term change
  • Aligning teams around vision and priorities

 

Listen to the podcast, A New Approach For Leaders To Deliver Successful Strategic Change, on Tiltco.ca. 

 

 

In this episode of Subscription Stories, Robbie Kellman Baxter interviews Electronic Arts’ Mike Blank about bringing subscription to the world of gaming. They discuss the challenges of subscriptions in the gaming industry, how to encourage consumers to discover new content within the subscription, and how EA offers multiple consumer models to support their “player first” promise.

‘EA has historically built their model around these awesome specific franchises, each with their own fan base: Madden, Battlefield, The Sims. So why did you decide to implement subscriptions across all the franchises? Do you remember how that happened?’

‘I frankly, I think this is what inspired us to think about this idea of a gaming subscription because we were seeing what was happening in the world of movies and music and books and where Netflix was. And it was clear that if you could offer something of value in the entertainment space to a consumer with low friction, with tremendous convenience, at a price that was reasonable, that that package would be something that someone would want to pay for. In our case, in the world of console gaming games are roughly 60 dollars as an upfront cost. And that cost has been relatively similar for many, many years. And so our business has been built around blockbuster releases of amazing entertainment, immersive entertainment experiences that someone would pay for and then enjoy for some period of time. Not dissimilar, perhaps, to a blockbuster movie that you might go to a movie theater for. Although the price point is a lot higher for games, it cost hundreds of millions of dollars to build a triple-A game. The world of gaming has evolved, but that price point that sixty dollars price point has remained relatively stagnant. And so when I reflect back about like, well, why did we get into this business? It was because what we were seeing, the behavior that we were seeing in the rest of the entertainment world. And the question we asked ourselves was, why is this not happening in games? What is different about gaming that is preventing us or any other publisher or any other major developer of gaming consoles to experiment in the world of subscriptions? Gaming is more complicated, though.’

 

Key points from this interview include:

  • The metrics EA used to measure success
  • How EA shares subscription data across the company without distracting from other “player first” projects
  • How to tackle pricing in the gaming world and how EA chose its pricing model

 

Catch the full episode, Mike Blanc on keeping a ‘players first’ mindset within a subscription business, on RobbieKellmanBaxter.com.

For more information on building a subscription business, Robbie will be speaking at a zoom conference, How to Build Super Compelling Subscription Products, on Tuesday, October 27, at 1:30 PM ET. 

 

 

Charity: water’s MZ Goodman joins Robbie Kellman Baxter to share how she is applying subscription model best practices to a nonprofit. They discuss how MZ leverages content marketing and digital community strategies developed in her work at The New York Times to build a donation-based subscription model, how they’ve leveraged a single 20-minute video to raise millions, and how to think about a Forever Promise in the context of engaging donors.

Welcome to the show. It’s your host, Robbie Kellman Baxter sharing subscription stories with you. Today’s guest is MZ Goodman. MZ is a true innovator, bringing the best practices of subscription, engagement, and brand from her work at The New York Times, Ralph Lauren, Glossier, and goop, to charity: water, a nonprofit that provides clean water to people in developing nations. The organization has been phenomenally successful by taking a different approach to fundraising. The 14 year old organization has raised over 450 million dollars. Join us as MZ shares the secrets of charity: water’s success and how to bring these principles to any organization. Welcome to the show, MZ. 

‘Hi, Robbie, thanks so much for having me.’

‘Now your title at Charity: water, can you tell me what your title is?’

‘Sure. So I’m SVP of Subscription.’

‘That is not a title that I’m used to hearing at nonprofit.’

‘I know.’

‘How did that happen? And what is a subscription to a nonprofit?’

‘I think it was, leadership was incredibly smart when they decided to pivot the business at the nonprofit in this direction, in that our COO, Lauren Letta, who’s incredibly visionary, she was already evaluating whether it made sense to create a subscriptions team focused on a North Star metric of predictive revenue so as to enable significant growth across the organization. And our model is very complicated. But it took a lot of moving parts. So it was a very intentional move on the part of leadership to create a cross-functional team focused on a North Star goal of building membership and growing recurring revenue.

 

Key points covered in this podcast include:

  • Why a mission is the most important factor for attracting subscribers
  • The importance of building a brand based on quality over charisma
  • Ways for nonprofits to allow members to remain active without opening their checkbooks
  • MZ’s advice for product leaders who want to transition to the nonprofit world
  • The differences between building a community at a news company, a make-up company, and a nonprofit

 

Listen to the full conversation, Subscription Stories, Charity:Water, on RobbieKellmanBaxter.com.

 

 

Diane Mulcahy was recently interviewed on the Ideas X People podcast where she discusses the gig economy and how to use it to your advantage.

I actually created the MBA class on the gig economy at Babson College about seven years ago, and at the time, the gig economy was not even a thing that people talked about or even were aware of. When people I used to tell people the name of the course, they would ask me if I was teaching in computer science, because they thought it was related to gigabytes. So that shows you how nascent the ideas were at the time. But as I taught the class and as the class evolved, in terms of topics, with my students, I decided to pull it all together into a book, and write the book.

‘Was that something that you were specifically interested in, or was it something that you saw there was a demand for and thought, ‘why not exploit it?’

‘I think it was both. Ever since I started working, from my first job out of college, I had a sense and a desire that I wanted to work differently, and that people in general should be able to work differently. So that was part of it. And then, part of it was, just noticing that even among my students, you know, there was a demand for these ideas and for this alternative to traditional employment.’

 

Key points discussed include:

  • What exactly the gig economy is and why it has come to be
  • Why the gig economy could actually be better than our current structure of work
  • The 3 Big takeaways from Diane’s book

 

Listen to the full podcast, The Gig Economy. A Concise Overview On What It Is & How To Thrive In It, on Ideas X People. 

 

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Eric Hiller to our community.  Eric is the managing partner of Hiller Associates, the leading consulting firm specializing in product cost management (PCM), should-cost, design-to-value and software product management.

He is a former McKinsey & Company engagement manager and operations expert. Before McKinsey, Mr. Hiller was the co-founder and founding CEO of two high technology start-ups: aPriori (a PCM software platform) and TADA.today. Before aPriori & TADA, he worked in product development and manufacturing at Ford Motor Co., John Deere, and Procter & Gamble.

Mr. Hiller is the author of the PCM blog www.ProductProfitAndRisk.com. He holds an MBA from the Harvard Business School and a master’s and bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.