personal development

personal development

Darryl Stickel shares a few best practices for parents who want to improve the bond of trust with their children. 

When it comes to trust, kids are a special case.  They tend to trust us more than they should when they are young and less than they should as they mature.  Unfortunately, our kids tend to trust us least when they could use our guidance the most.  As they mature they are making life changing decisions and at risk for making mistakes that could be life altering.  Often it is during this period that they turn to their friends, who usually have little insight or experience, for advice.  How much better would it be for them to feel comfortable turning to a parent?  Who is going to have their best interests at heart more than the people who raised them?

Trust is the willingness to make ourselves vulnerable to another.  When our kids are young we go out of our way to make sure that they don’t trust others inappropriately, we try to limit how vulnerable they can become.  This protection can often mean that the first trust violations they experience occur at home:  failure to follow through on a promise, or a set of rules that seems to apply only to them and not the adults in their lives.

The intent of this volume of the Trust Coach newsletter is to raise awareness about trust and the role it plays in raising our kids.  Parenting is an incredibly complex task and there isn’t a manual that comes along with each newborn child.  There’s no silver bullet; the perfect approach and parent for one child may be a train wreck with another.  We often don’t talk about parenting, sharing best practices or problem solving with friends.  My goal here is not to tell people what they are doing wrong or suggest they are bad parents.  I am hoping to add something to people’s tool boxes that have worked for me and others I’ve helped.

 

Key points include:

  • Command and control
  • Expert opinions
  • The trust model

 

Read the full article, Trust and parenting, building a deeper bond, on TrustUnlimited.com.

 

Glenton Jelbert examines passages in the Bible to extrapolate fallacies, fallibilities, and the philosophical merits within. 

Was Paul a deluded apocalypticist? In other words, did he believe the apocalypse (i.e. some kind of dramatic end of world event) would happen in his lifetime? The answer to this is almost certainly yes. My friend, Mark Smith, recently wrote a nice summary of the failed second coming (available on Amazon) responding to the various theologies that try to get around it.

Of course, Jesus made some pretty bold claims on the subject, which gives Christians the opportunity to exercise the full scope of their creativity with various interpretations.

Unpopular is C. S. Lewis’s take, which is that the verse:

This generation shall not pass till all these things be done.

Matt 24:34

is “the most embarrassing verse in the Bible.” (The World’s Last Night by C. S. Lewis). He goes on to argue that Jesus is fully God and fully man, and we need appreciate that the fully man bit comes with consequences. When Jesus asked “Who touched me?” (Luke 7:45) he really wanted to know. And, similarly, when he prophesied that the apocalypse was near, he just got it wrong, but hey, to err is human, even for a man-god. Forget, for a minute, that human prophets were disregarded and put to death for getting it wrong (Dt 18:22). Here’s the deal in Lewis’s own words:

“And if limitation, and therefore ignorance, was thus taken up [by Jesus], we ought to expect that the ignorance should at some time be actually displayed.” C.S. Lewis, The World’s Last Night

But I wanted in this post to discuss some of the reasons why we think Paul thought “The End was Nigh!” (Mark 1:15).

Read the full article, Paul the Deluded Apocalypticist, on GlentonJelbert.com.

 

In this article, Amy Giddon reveals what her team discovered when they asked the public about courage.

What we learned when we asked 250 people about their fears.

‘Courage starts with showing up and letting ourselves be seen.’ — Brené Brown

We’re having trouble seeing each other these days. It’s always been hard to show up in our full complexity and contradictions, and now we have social media further tempting us to filter and edit our stories. We fear the judgment in the comments section and hang on every “like,” only sharing what fits our narrative. Even those close to us may remain partial mysteries, while those unlike us can seem downright confounding, and even scary at times. We fill in the blanks with assumptions and judgments of our own, maintaining our distance. So how do we get past this to see and be seen more clearly?

Become curious. Thoughtful questions are an invitation to deeper connection.

We’re building a mobile app, Daily Haloha, to challenge ourselves to share beyond our social profile. Daily Haloha asks people around the world one thought-provoking fill-in-the-blank question every day. And since people remain anonymous — and we leave out judgments and “likes” — they can be comfortable answering the questions honestly, and even vulnerably.

 

Key areas covered in this article include:

  • Physical risks
  • Emotional risks
  • Financial risks

 

Read the full article, The Surprising Connection Between Curiosity and Courage, on LinkedIn.

 

In a world that has an abundance of aphorisms and rules for every occasion, Robbie Kellman Baxter suggests that the community of professionals think twice before following advice.

 

Other than maybe the golden rule, I am hard pressed to think of any saying that is always true. And that shouldn’t be surprising, as the answer to so many questions is “it depends.”

  • “Should I let my daughter go to the late night party?” It depends…on your child’s age, maturity, and where the party is being held.
  • “Should I quit this job right away or stick it out for a while?” It depends…on your other options.
  • “Is a liberal arts education the best thing ever or a waste of money?” It depends… on what you want from your education.

And yet, people still spew out these aphorisms like they are universally true and unassailable.

 

Read the full article, Nobody Ever Said “I Wish I’d Spent More Time at Work”​ on Their Deathbed …and Other Lies, on LinkedIn.