Pandemic

Pandemic

 

Robyn Bolton shares introspective insights and answers on working from home during the pandemic.

In middle school and high school my dad and I would have massive arguments about my math homework. And by “massive,” I mean arguments that make episodes of The Real Housewives look like polite differences of opinion over tea and crumpets.

The issue was not my struggles to understand the work (though I’m sure that played into things) but rather my insistence on knowing WHY I needed to learn the content in the first place.

My dad, a metallurgist before becoming a computer engineer, seemed to think the answers to “Why?” were (1) you will need to know this in the future and (2) because this is the assignment.

To which I would respond, (1) no I won’t because I’m going to be a lawyer or a writer and even if I’m not those two things I can say with 100% certainty I won’t be an engineer and (2) that is not an acceptable reason.

As you can imagine, things would escalate from there.

In the decades since, with the exception of some single-variable algebra and basic geometry, I have yet to use most of the math that I was forced to learn and I still insist that “because that’s the assignment/the rules/how things are done” is not an acceptable answer.

Usually I apply that same stubborn curiosity to help my clients find and capitalize on opportunities to do things differently and better, create value, and innovate.

But, in the last week as I, like most Americans, find myself largely confined to my home, my curiosity is extending to my own environment and habits and I’m not always prepared for the insights that emerge.

 

Key points include:

  • Why am I trying to maintain all my pre-pandemic habits?
  • Why am I watching non-stop news?
  • Why are there 6 dozen eggs in the refrigerator?

 

Read the full article, 5 Whys of Working from Home, on Milezero.io.

 

 

Eric Hiller unrolls a few facts behind the need to hoard toilet paper (TP) as he shares his knowledge on the supply chain in this article recently published on MarketWatch.

One of the bizarre phenomena that we have been experiencing in the United States during the visit of our unfriendly visitor from Wuhan, the SARS-COV-2 virus which causes COVID-19 disease, is the strange behavior of people to irrationally hoard toilet paper (TP). I admit, this is one thing that I did not expect, nor did I expect it to go on for so long. I told my wife two to three weeks ago that this would not be a problem, because of the reasons that will be discussed in this article. But I admit, so far this problem has not resolved itself.

I feel pretty competent to talk on this subject, not only because I know the product so intimately, but also because I spent a summer at the East River plant of Procter & Gamble in Green Bay, Wisconsin making TP. I was interning as an undergraduate as a process engineer implementing statistical process control and machine center lining (exciting stuff… yes, I know). It just so happened that I was working on the “converting” floor for Charmin, Charmin Ultra, and Banner toilet paper. This, where you take finished rolls, that is the size the Jolly Green Giant must use (maybe 12 feet tall and 8 feet in diameter, weighing a couple of thousand pounds), and progressively unroll and cut them up until they end up in cases shipping to your friendly grocery store or another outlet.

So, when it comes to TP, I know my… stuff.

 

Facts included in this article:

  • The US supply chain
  • Why people are hoarding TP
  • The cure for TP shortage

 

Read the full article, Three Sheets to the Wind, on the MarketWatch website.