Networking

Networking

 

If you are stuck in a rut, at a career crossroads, or just not moving forward as fast as you want to, Christy Johnson shares a blog from her website on the difference between a mentor and a champion and how each one can help you. 

‘Where are your champions?

You’ve probably heard the hackneyed advice for career advancement: “It’s who you know, not what you know.” But how do you know who you should get to know? Figuring out who you should cultivate relationships with when time and energy is limited isn’t always straightforward.

After interviewing over 200 professionals from diverse backgrounds and industries for Project Ascendance, we found one relationship trumped the others when it comes to ROI: the champion. The individuals we spoke with described the people who advocated for them in and out of their own workplace—their champions—as pivotal to  their career success.

What’s more, when we asked participants to reflect on their professional experiences and tell us what they wished they had done differently, the most frequent regret they shared was not seeking out champions sooner. While these champion/protégé relationships are rarer than mentor/mentee relationships, our participants showed us that they can be developed over time.

There are, however, fundamental differences between mentors and champions. In a mentor/mentee relationship, the mentee receives most of the benefits and the mentor expects little in return. In a champion/protégé relationship, both people make a greater commitment to each other and have more at stake. Championing is a deeper more reciprocal relationship that requires mutual trust. Below is a quick guide for distinguishing between your mentors and champions.’

 

Key points include:

  • Reciprocal relationships
  • Affinity and social proximity
  • Constructive champions

 

Read the full post, Do you have a champion or a mentor? on artemisconnection.com.

 

 

Robbie Baxter shares valuable advice on how to build and manage a network in a comfortable and authentic way.

A few years ago, my sister asked me to co lead a workshop to help a group of her fellow psychologists build their professional network.

Here’s how she opened the event: “I know most of us really don’t like networking, and I’m glad you’re here anyway. For most of us networking is worse than a sharp stick in the eye”

I heard murmurs of agreement and saw heads bobbing up and down. These people hated networking. But I came to learn that a big part of it was how they defined networking and the approach they believed they had to use to build and nurture their networks.

I have come to learn that for many people, networking feels inauthentic and cheesy, and seems to take them away from the real work of helping clients and doing the work.

And yet, your network can be a tremendously powerful tool in “doing the work” and your investment in building your network can be among the most authentic and meaningful parts of your day.

In my work building engaged communities and forever transactions for all kinds of organizations, I have spent a lot of time teaching people how to build their networks in an ethical and comfortable way.

Here are some tips that can help you build yours!

 

Key points include:

  • Communication tips
  • Strategies for segmentation 
  • Developing opportunities

 

Read the full article, 30 Days to a Stronger Network in 2021, on LinkedIn.

 

 

David A. Fields shares a blog post on the omnipotent power of gratitude and how it can serve your consulting practice. Extra bonus tips included in the comments. 

At this time of year, one word is bandied about with unusual frequency. It turns out that word can help you win more consulting business.

Each Friday I pause to consider everything I have to be grateful for. Family, friends, a thriving business, homemade banana-chocolate cream pie. Some wise folks do this exercise every day. Others limit their gratitude to a day here or there such as Thanksgiving (in the U.S.) or when they exchange gifts.

Gratitude is terrific. Warm and snuggly as a cashmere afghan. But how does that one word help your consulting firm?

 

Key areas covered include:

  • Relationships
  • Confidence
  • Networking

 

Read the full post, Five Supremely Practical Ways Gratitude Benefits Your Consulting Firm, on David’s website.

 

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Ryan Wilber.  Ryan has spent the past 10 years working with healthcare providers to design and implement innovative solutions to pressing care delivery challenges. His experience spans working with small community hospitals, large academic research centers, and integrated multi-hospital systems in the US and internationally to assess and implement new processes and technologies.

While his clients have been varied, his work has had in common a focus on addressing the core provider challenges around access, cost of care, patient experience, and quality. Increasingly, this work has centered on digital and virtual solutions. He believes the most effective solutions to healthcare challenges combine process and culture change with innovation and technology. To that end, he also works with a Bay Area venture fund to assess emerging healthcare technologies and advises their healthcare-focused portfolio companies on how to meet the needs of healthcare providers.

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Sarah Dolman with Healthtech Catalyst. Sarah has 15 years of broad healthcare experience, spanning bio-pharmaceuticals, health-tech, med-tech and insurers. She has spent the last five years advising teams as they define product strategy, identify strategic investors and build deep partnerships. Sarah has experience in top-tier consulting (BCG), health-tech (Verily, f.k.a Google [X] Life Sciences) and drug-development (Merck). Sarah is most excited when projects sit at the interface of science, tech/AI, and care-delivery.