Leadership tips

Leadership tips

Bernie Heine shares a post designed to improve leadership skills by avoiding these seven mistakes.

Avoid negative conflicts.

Resolving conflicts, both employee- and customer-related, is an area in which all leaders must excel. To address the conflicts in the right way, it is crucial to understand that there are two types of conflicts:

Productive conflicts: Productive conflicts are good for business. They are based on being trustworthy and vulnerable towards the person you are communicating with. Everyone must have the freedom to create a productive conflict to acquire new and innovative business ideas. A productive conflict is a healthy conversation between people who share the same goal. In his best-selling book, The 5 Dysfunctions of a Team, Patrick Lencioni states that vulnerability-based trust is essential to achieving productive conflict and building cohesive teams.

Negative conflicts: When there is no trust, especially vulnerability-based trust, there is no productive conversation either. If a leader shuts down all constructive criticism and treats it as an assault on their character, that can only cause mistrust and prevent others from speaking their mind.

Being a great leader means developing emotional intelligence that will allow you to have enough humility to recognize your own mistakes and understand the difference between positive and negative disagreements.

  1. Have a friendly attitude vs. favoritism.

Becoming too friendly towards certain employees can sometimes be a hindrance to good leadership. Having a friendly attitude and beaming with positivity is one thing; becoming too friendly is a whole other situation. A leader who fails to set clear boundaries will face employees who try to take advantage of the situation and ask for special attention. The best way to set boundaries is to treat everyone equally, and of course, adapt to their behavioral style. Do not allow yourself to provide unique benefits for one of the employees and not for others.

The remaining points include:

  • Standing by your words
  • Paying attention to employee needs
  • Sharing the vision

Read the full article, 7 Leadership Mistakes to Avoid, on ProfessionalBusinessCoaches.com.

 

 

Jeffery Perry shares an article that explains how to leave a leadership position in the best possible way and shape.

Leavership? No, this is not a typo where the “v” is meant to be a “d.” Much has been written about business leadership—the art of guiding and motivating others to achieve a set of goals and objectives. Most business leaders are judged based on performance during their leadership roles. However, leavership is the art of personally transitioning leadership roles in ways that leave organizations better positioned and poised for future success. In essence, the art of knowing how to successfully pass the baton. 

From start-up founders to Fortune 500 CEOs, countless accounts exist of effective leaders who drive significant value for their businesses and stakeholders. Effective leaders often combine qualities that include the ability to inspire, empower, and innovate. These qualities frequently result in purpose-led organizations, clear strategies and visions, resiliency and agility, leading market positions, strong revenue growth, high profitability, satisfied customers, engaged employees, and positively impacted communities. At some point, however, all great leadership runs transition.

The best organizations invest in succession planning for key leadership roles to ensure continuity and ongoing success. Key elements of succession planning include analyses of future business needs, talent pipeline identification and development, and readiness. However, in a recent Korn Ferry global study on succession planning, 32% of respondents were either dissatisfied or extremely dissatisfied with succession outcomes.

 

Key points include:

  • Client relationships
  • Unfinished business
  • Ideas dialogue

 

Read the full article, Leavership – Knowing How to Pass the Baton, on leadmandates.com.