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Investments

Sanjay Gandhi shares an article that discusses strategies for companies and High Net Worth families and individuals that can provide a silver lining amidst the tough news and provide long-term benefits when valuations rise again.

The coronavirus (COVID-19) has resulted in significant public market losses, as reflected in daily stock market gyrations and volatility. Private companies, asset and debt values have equally been affected by the pandemic. For High Net Worth individuals and companies, certain strategies can provide a silver lining amidst the tough news and provide long-term benefits when valuations rise again. For many private holdings, COVID-19 will provide some downward impact on value. This can result from significant disruption in operations, revenue/margin drop off, challenges in accessing capital, slower growth and delayed exit timelines. Certain direct impacts can already be seen as the market for secondary sales has started to shrink. Another immediate impact is revision of near and medium-term cashflow projections.

What’s Different?

COVID-19 is a “Material Disintermediating Event”

For valuation purposes, we often consider past performance when looking at value. This can include recent financing rounds or historical financial performance of a company and market transactions/sales of companies. However, COVID-19 is a “material event” which can disrupt the assumption that historical data points are presumptively the foundation of the future.

This triggers the need for a fresh look to consider the value of a company in light of its prospects in current and future economic circumstances.

Key points include:

  • Top strategies
  • Factors impacting valuation
  • How to estimate forward-looking performance?

Read the full article, Smart Strategies in a Lower Valuation World, on OxfordVP.com.

 

Kaihan Krippendorff provides insight into the rising valuations of tech stocks and attributed the rise of cryptocurrencies, and NFTs (non-fungible tokens).

It’s been a while since Saturday Night Live was a staple of Monday morning conversation, but this week as our team gathered around the Zoom screen to join our check-in call, the sketch comedy show was top of mind. I can’t imagine many missed it, or at least the news surrounding it, but last weekend’s episode featured special guest Elon Musk.

In his opening monologue, Musk commendably revealed for the first time his Asperger’s diagnosis, while poking fun at his unbelievable track record of innovation: “I reinvented electric cars and I’m sending people to Mars on a rocket ship. Did you think I was also going to be a chill, normal dude?” Musk joked about Dogecoin, a cryptocurrency which, along with NFTs (non-fungible tokens) and other blockchain-based value exchange systems, has taken over headlines recently.

Musk’s statements during the show around Dogecoin’s validity sent it into a downward spiral, while his follow-up statements that SpaceX would accept it as legitimate payment for a mission to the moon sent the cryptocurrency skyrocketing. At the same, his decision to halt acceptance of bitcoin for Tesla payments based on environmental factors caused the digital tokens to plummet.

These volatile reactions to Musk’s statements, brought about primarily by posts on Twitter and reactions in social networks, echo GameStop’s stock surge earlier this year. They demonstrate the power of communities, virtual and in-person, to self-organize around a common cause, whether it’s a well-loved retail videogame chain or a parody cryptocurrency that began as a meme.

All jokes aside, those who have been following the news this year around the valuation of cryptocurrencies and NFTs combined with blockchain technologies will recognize broader implications for how we conduct business and exchange goods in the future of our society.

 

Key points include:

  • Volatile reactions to stock trading
  • Power from coordination of resources or services
  • The convergence of two strategic trends

 

Read the full article, Elon Musk, Dogecoin, And NFTs: Coordinating Without An Official Coordinator, on Kaihan.net.

 

 

Jeff Perry shares a post that identifies the positive potential of divestitures in a company’s growth portfolio. 

Houston, do we have a problem? While many companies talk about the need to regularly reshape its portfolio, divestitures are too often considered aborted missions. Quite the contrary, divestitures can be rocket fuel for other business priorities of the parent company.

Divestitures are unsung in portfolio-shaping. When businesses are rumored to be for sale, many questions are raised internally and externally: Why is the business on the block? Is it underperforming? Was it starved investment? Was required management talent lacking? Why would the business be of more value to someone else?

Divestitures are not typically afforded the buzz and attention of their M&A cousins. When companies announce major acquisitions, there is often great anticipation and excitement regarding how the newly acquired entity will drive growth, expand geographic markets, expand products and services, and/or improve supply chain efficiency. High potential leaders in the business lineup for roles to help in acquisition and integration processes.

When divestitures are considered, first, there are fewer people “in the know.” When it is more known that a business may be a divestiture candidate, in addition to the questions highlighted above, high potential leaders often run for the hills. People may experience changing allegiances throughout the divestiture process as well. While everyone starts thinking on behalf of the parent company, some will shift to wearing the hat of the divested business, especially if they are ring-fenced and going with the deal.

 

Key points include:

  • The barriers to overcome
  • Creating value
  • Capital raised

 

Read the full article, Divestitures Can Be Rocket Fuel, Not Aborted Missions, on LeadMandates.com.

 

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Rodolphe Lebrun with LDP Partner.  Rodolphe Lebrun is an advisor and interim executive for biotech, medtech and biopharma. He spent 5 years at McKinsey focusing on Life Sciences and led commercial excellence at AbbVie Belgium for 2 years. Prior to McKinsey, he was a R&D project manager in aerospace within the Safran group. Rodolphe supports Life Sciences companies across their lifecycle: raising venture capital as interim CEO for startups, reviewing go-to-market strategies in scale-ups and improving biologics manufacturing in Big Pharma. He lives in Belgium and serves clients mostly in Europe.