information technology

information technology

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Vijay Mehra with d2t2 LLC. Vijay has over 25 years consulting and industry experience in information technology, digital and operations.  Prior to branching out with his own LLC, he was the Digital & Technology Leader (Asia Pacific) for KKR Capstone and prior to that he was the South East Asia Digital VP & Associate Partner for McKinsey Digital Labs, an arm of McKinsey & Company.

He is thoroughly experienced in solving complex business and information technology problems to boost sales and improve EBITDA.  His global work experience spans six countries.  Vijay’s expertise in digital solutions and core technology systems spans a wide range of sectors including banking & finance, metals, chemicals, oil & gas, energy & renewables, telecommunications, software products, high tech, consumer products, industrial products, distribution & logistics and others.

Vijay holds four degrees – two Masters degrees from MIT (MBA, Sloan School of Management and MS in Software Systems Engineering) and two bachelors degrees from Cornell University (Operations Research and Economics).

He is an avid traveler, loves tennis and swimming and holds a private pilot’s license.  Vijay is a citizen of the United States of America and is currently authorized to work in the USA, Singapore and India.

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Paul Harrington with Pathfinder Consulting Group.  Prior to launching Pathfinder Consulting Group LLC, Paul spent ~9 years with McKinsey & Company, where he was a Partner based in Washington D.C. Within the firm’s Global Public and Social Sector Practice, Paul led the Go to Market (GTM) team, which spanned 23 countries.

Prior to McKinsey, Paul held roles General Dynamics Information Technology, Johnson & Johnson, Ariba (now part of SAP) and Andersen Consulting (now Accenture), and is a former U.S. Army officer. Paul has particular expertise in Public Sector Go to Market strategy and operating models, as both an advisor and practitioner.

Paul lives in Northern Virginia (near Washington, D.C.) with his wife and son. Paul is happy to collaborate on any topics related to Public Sector and/or GTM.

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Anthony Howe.  Anthony has worked at three leading consultancies including McKinsey (strategy), AT Kearney (manufacturing/operations) and Accenture (Information Technology).  After leaving consulting, Anthony joined the financial services industry, initially launching a corporate development team for the CEO of a private payments company and then progressing to leadership roles at Wachovia, Wells Fargo and, most recently, USAA.

In his most recent role as Head of Strategic Intelligence at USAA, Anthony managed three teams including corporate strategy, enterprise competitive intelligence and strategy analytics.  Mr. Howe has the ability to integrate and coordinate complex transformation initiatives given his functional breadth spanning strategy, marketing, operations, information technology, data and analytics and corporate development.  Anthony has only recently decided to pursue independent consulting after USAA necessarily turned its focus from growth to risk and compliance given the current regulatory environment.

 

Dan Markovitz identifies the difference between facts and data and why you need both to make a fully informed assessment. 

Taiichi Ohno said, “Data is of course important in manufacturing, but I place the greatest emphasis on facts.” You can leave out the word “manufacturing,” and apply the concept to anything in your company or your life. Facts are more important than data.

When he talked about his preference for facts over data, he was urging people to go and see for themselves. Gathering facts comes from close observation of people, of objects, of spaces. 

By contrast, spreadsheets, reports, and anecdotal accounts are not facts. They’re data. They’re two-dimensional representations of reality, which makes it easy to jump to conclusions. 

Data tells you how often a machine breaks down on an assembly line. Facts—direct observation—show you that the machine is dirty, covered in oil, and hasn’t been cleaned and maintained in a long time.

Read the full article, Just the Facts, Ma’am, on the Markovitz website.