Healthcare Access

Healthcare Access

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Ryan Wilber.  Ryan has spent the past 10 years working with healthcare providers to design and implement innovative solutions to pressing care delivery challenges. His experience spans working with small community hospitals, large academic research centers, and integrated multi-hospital systems in the US and internationally to assess and implement new processes and technologies.

While his clients have been varied, his work has had in common a focus on addressing the core provider challenges around access, cost of care, patient experience, and quality. Increasingly, this work has centered on digital and virtual solutions. He believes the most effective solutions to healthcare challenges combine process and culture change with innovation and technology. To that end, he also works with a Bay Area venture fund to assess emerging healthcare technologies and advises their healthcare-focused portfolio companies on how to meet the needs of healthcare providers.

Luca Ottinetti’s company blog shares case studies that reveal how Intel and SpaceX successfully launched new products, and what went wrong with Nokia and Swissair’s business model innovations.

 

Entering a new market with new products that target new customers requires a new business model. It is a powerful strategic initiative that changes the rules of competition. It also represents a challenge with odds of success at roughly 30%, but ultimately – when done right – it rewards winners with huge returns.

Managers need to know what they’re in for if they decide to pursue this path of business growth. The challenge in entering a new market through a successful business model innovation (BMI) consists of getting two elements right:

(1) the pursuit of attractive market opportunities, and

(2) ownership of the strategic control points in the industry to protect profit streams.

We look at cases of success and failure by companies that have entered new markets with new business model designs to illustrate the determinants of success.

 

Included in this article:

  • Two case studies on successful business model innovation 
  • Two case studies on failed business model innovation

Read the full article, Market Entry through New Business Model Design, on the Great Prairie Group website.

Robbie Baxter explains why companies need to prioritize their mission over their products to take advantage of new technologies and services and build a new kind of relationship with today’s–and tomorrow’s–members.

As association leaders, many of you are Membership Pioneers. Membership is something you probably have been thinking about for years. But in the last 10 years, membership has reinvented nearly every industry. Companies like LinkedIn, Amazon and Salesforce have created forever transactions of their own with their customers by using many of the tactics that are core to the deep relationships trade groups, professional societies and other not-for-profit associations have been building for decades.

But they’re using new tactics–streaming content, frictionless checkout, recommendation engines, artificial intelligence–to create dramatically improved experiences. As a result, consumer expectations about what membership means have changed. And the drivers of this new perception are not coming from other associations, they’re coming from Silicon Valley tech.

Maybe this is a good thing though. In times of great change, there are big winners, and big losers.

So what can your organization do to be one of the winners?

 

Points covered include:

-Product market fit

-Taking advantage of new technologies and services

-Prioritizing your mission over your products

 

Read the full article, Memberships Are Changing and What it Means for Your Association, on LinkedIn.

Jonathan Paisner identifies the cause of tension between corporate marketing and brand marketing, and how you can bridge the divide with a brand messaging format that communicates company vision and value for the end consumer.

 

B2B companies experience an ongoing tension between corporate marketing and product marketing – because their goals aren’t completely alignedFor corporate marketing, the brand is built upon a big idea that aims to capture the promise of the organization at a macro level. In technology and tech-enabled markets, this big idea can be pretty grand (think IBM’s Smarter Planet). For the organization as a whole, this big idea helps to bring different pieces of the company together behind a common purpose and perspective.

 

Read the full article, Bridging the Gap between Corporate Marketing and Product Marketing, on the Brand Experienced Group website.