executive coaching

executive coaching

                      

Kaihan Krippendorff shares an article that identifies how to take better control of your subconscious to become aware of valuable information. 

We have heard the adages like “work on your business, not in it” and “come up to see the forest for the trees.” At McKinsey they urged us to continually take the “top management perspective” by zooming up to look at the business overall before jumping into the details.

But we know Bill Gates used to lock himself in a cabin for a week every year just to read and think during his “Think Weeks”. My friend Tony Crabbe, an organizational psychologist, has written two outstanding books with practical advice for clearing out the busy to give you time to think. Cal Newport goes deep into the need for us to clear space for “deep work” in his book.

Dan Brown, author of The Da Vinci Code, gets up to write at 4 a.m. 365 days a year. Stephen King clears his calendar to write 2,000 words every day before he allows himself to engage with the outside world. Great athletes envision the game before they get on the field (indeed, my friend and former roommate who served as captain of the US national rugby team told me he would spend hours envisioning every moment of the game before a match).

In other words, maybe the old adage should be reversed to “don’t just do something … sit there!

 

Key points include:

  • Identifying what you want
  • Instructing your mind 
  • Structuring your thinking process

 

Read the full article, Activating The Subconscious Power Of Strategy, on Kaihan.net. 

 

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Chandler Arnold with Renegade Consulting Collective.  Chandler has spent 20+ years designing and implementing purpose-driven impact initiatives for social enterprises, family offices, and more than fifteen Fortune 500 Companies. These companies include The Walt Disney Company, Pizza Hut, Ford, Target, New York Life, The Coca-Cola Company, and others. Chandler has also served as the CEO of Experience Early Learning and the COO of First Book, where he oversaw global operations and the distribution of more than 100 million new books to children from low-income families. A former BCG consultant, Chandler has deep experience working with leaders in a number of industries including CPG, food & beverage, entertainment, retail, biotech, and philanthropy.

Chandler and his husband live in Washington, DC with their five-year old son. Chandler is happy to collaborate on projects focused on public-private partnerships, cause-marketing campaigns, scaling social enterprises, executive coaching, and advising bold philanthropists.

 

Robyn M. Bolton provides key tips that you can take to motivate corporate executives into action. 

Things we know we should do because they’re good for us:

Eat 5 servings of fruits and vegetables each day

Floss twice a day

Get 10,000 steps a day

Buy insurance

Consistently invest in innovation

Let’s be honest, the above list could also be titled, “Things we know we should do but don’t.”

Why?  Why do we choose not to do things that years of research prove are good for us and for which solutions are readily available?

Because they’re inconvenient, uncomfortable, expensive, and, most of all, because we have not yet been burned by not doing them.

Experience is a better motivator of change and driver of behavior than knowledge. We don’t floss until we’ve had one (or more) painful and bloody dentist appointments.  We don’t buy insurance until we have to deal with a break-in.  We don’t invest in innovation until we’re desperate for revenue, profit, or growth.

The good news is that, at least when it comes to innovation, we don’t have to wait to be desperate or to get burned before we do what we know we should.  We can create experiences that motivate change.

 

Key points include:

  • Borrowing relevant experiences
  • Creating experiences of success
  • Immersing everyone in the experience

 

Read the full article, How to Get Corporate Executives to Walk Their Innovation Talk, on the MileZero website.

 

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Wendy Richards with MarTel Advisors. Member of the Board for AMC Natural Drinks, Wendy advises this family-held Spanish corporation on international strategy and leadership development. Beyond the boardroom, she builds team cohesion through executive coaching and change management, serving PE and Venture-backed firms.

An experienced Chief Marketing Officer in the investment industry, Wendy’s clients include Makena Capital Management and Altegris Investments. She led telecoms finance for HSBC in London and the design and roll-out of the first digital mobile networks across Europe for AirTouch/Vodafone based in Brussels. Wendy was honored as Fortune’s “Top 50 Most Powerful Women in Business in Europe”.

A McKinsey and Stanford alumna, she is an avid sailor at home on San Francisco Bay and has sailed her 41-foot sloop across the Med and the Caribbean.

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Marcia Spitalney Nuffer with BlueShor.  Marcia Nuffer spent 21 years at McKinsey. For roughly the first half, Marcia was a strategy consultant focused on helping organizations realize their business goals through organizational change and leadership development. In 2003, Marcia became McKinsey’s Chief Learning Officer. In this role, Marcia was responsible for building one of the most lauded global leadership development programs in the world and leading strategic people initiatives for the firm.

Today, Marcia has her own consulting firm, BlueShor, focusing on leadership and talent development, executive coaching, and people strategy. While serving companies and nonprofits of any size, Marcia has a particular interest in manager development at high growth companies.

Marcia is happy to collaborate on projects related to leadership and talent development – both strategically and programmatically – and talent strategy. She is also open to executive and team coaching opportunities. While Marcia’s major focus is the Atlanta area, her long-term global experience and the possibilities of remote work enable her to collaborate internationally as well.

Many financial service leaders are not convinced that total market growth is important. Luiz Zorzella explains why even small companies can benefit from paying attention to and capitalizing on what is happening to the market.

You may have heard – or asked – questions such as:

“If our company does not hold a large market share in our markets, should we worry about market growth?”

“How would we even estimate market growth?”

“If most of our existing clients are in not in growth markets, should we abandon them and go after new ones?”

Those are very valid questions:

In most markets, companies with single-digit market shares feel no significant impact of market saturation (that feeling that you have exhausted all good leads). That means that as a general rule, regardless of whether the market is expanding or contracting, there is always an abundant supply of fresh, good prospects to be chased.

 

Areas explored include:

-Growing markets have growing needs. For example, your commercial clients will be investing to expand capacity and may need CRE and equipment loans to open new locations.

-Growing markets have more sophisticated needs. For example, companies in growing markets often need more attractive Group Benefits to attract talent and ward off poachers.

-Growing markets tend to supply better clients. For example, credit quality tends to be good and to improve over time in growing markets – thus not only improving the quality and value of your portfolio but also freeing up capital to invest in growth.

-Growing markets will carry you. This is because your existing clients, who have a lower acquisition cost than new clients, will continue to grow.

 

Read the full article, The Eternal Hunt for Growth in Financial Services, on the Amquant website.