Event Design

Event Design

 

In the third post in a series on off-site leadership, Aneta Key addresses the substance dimension of event design.

I strongly believe that any event design has 3 important dimensions to consider: 

Substance — This is the most important dimension of the 3. It is the “hardcore” look at the event and is what executives truly care about: What outcomes are we creating? What content are we discussing? What work are we advancing?

Structure — The second most important dimension addresses the logical and systematic approach that would allow the group to achieve its objectives. How are we breaking down and sequencing activities? How are we socially engineering alignment? How are we allocating time? How are we making decisions? 

Style — If substance and structure determine what and when it needs to be done, style determines how it should be done. In general, this should be the third dimension to consider, as “form follows function” in off-site design as well. That said, the 3 dimensions are interrelated and the ‘feeling’ you want to create may impact the other 2 dimensions. 

In fact, these 3 dimensions apply to speeches you give, presentations you develop, and even blog posts you publish.

 

Key points in this article include:

  • Systems thinking applied to off-site design
  • What are the desired outputs?
  • What off-site modules do we need?
  • What inputs do we need?
  • Highlighting Design Choices

 

Read the full article, Leadership Off-Site 101: Part III — Substance design, on the Aedea Partners’ website.

 

 

Diane Mulcahy interviews Krystal Hicks to find out why some companies don’t hire remote employees, and how the Gig Economy has shifted the power balance between employers and employees.

 

Krystal Hicks is the founder of JOBTALK, a company that grew out of her side gig providing talent, recruiting, and job-hunting advice to companies and individuals. Before going out on her own, she managed U.S. Talent Acquisition for the Swiss chocolate maker Lindt, and was the former Director of Career Services at the University of New Hampshire.

 

Points they discuss include:

 

  1. Leaders lacking trust
  2. Managerial Darwinism
  3. The power balance between employers and employees
  4. Understanding what employees want

 

Read the full article, Women In The Gig Economy: Krystal Hicks On Why Companies Don’t Trust Their Employees, on the Forbes Inc. website.