Employee Motivation

Employee Motivation

Often the best-laid strategies of consultants come to a grinding halt at the people level. Amanda Setili shares a post that offers a few practical steps you can take to encourage others to take action.

The biggest obstacle to your progress is often something you can’t see, hear or even name. It is not something tangible and obvious. The biggest obstacle is… a quiet unwillingness—perhaps even reluctance—to do the things that you need someone to do.

You ask Engineering to create a better system for collecting payments from customers, and nine months in a row they have told you to wait “just one more month.”

The Sales team tells you (a Product Manager) that they will start selling your product at meetings with prospective clients, but week after week they come back from sales calls and say they ran out of time before bringing it up.

The reasons why this happens vary widely, but the essence of getting someone to do what you want basically comes down to three things:

 1.) Do they have the ability to do what you want?

You can’t expect a media buyer to audit financial results, and you can’t merely ask someone to double their performance. Pure and simple, the other person may lack the capability to do as you wish, and there are times when this could be too embarrassing to admit.

The first step is always to do a reality check to determine if someone has the skill, experience and knowledge to do what you wish.

If you determine they lack the skill, you have several options. You might, for example, help the person learn a new skill or you could turn to a different person or group.

Key points include:

  • Belief in assessment
  • Cost value
  • Reasonable risk

Read the full article, When Others Won’t Do… What You Need Them To Do, on LinkedIn.

 

Jared Simmons provides a concise post that identifies the three most common factors that impede progress. 

Whether you are chasing profit or purpose, a team’s ability to make progress is critical to achieving its objectives. There are many obstacles that keep a team from operating at its full potential, but the three most common (and solvable) ones are ambiguity, apathy, and amateurism. The challenge is recognizing them in action.

 

Discover how the following three A’s impact your team:

  • Ambiguity
  • Apathy
  • Amateurism

 

Read the full post on the, Making progress: The three silent killers, on the Outlast website. 

 

 

Stephen Wunker explores the emotional connection in marketing and how this connection can be applied to Jobs to be Done to lay out pathways for creating targeted, meaningful, and relevant innovations.

The modern Mini Cooper—offered in a variety of eye-popping colors—burst onto the scene in 2001 as a chic version of an old British classic. It quickly became a fixture in trendy urban neighborhoods around the globe. Today, nearly twenty years later, the car still hasn’t lost its freshness: demand for Minis has remained robust with annual sales increasing at a steady pace of 5.2% per year.

On paper, the Mini doesn’t look like it should be such a break-out success. While its modest size makes it ideal for city living, other cars such as the Honda Fit or the Chevy Sonic are equally manageable in tight quarters. The Mini’s Comfort ratings in the Kelley Blue Book are tied with those of the VW Beetle and Toyota Yaris. Its gas mileage is no better than its competitors’, and sometimes it is worse. And with a sticker price that averages about $5,000 more than comparably sized rivals, the case for buying a Mini seems pretty weak.

The Mini’s surprising success comes from its unique, almost ineffable customer appeal. People just feel good about buying one.

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • Figuring out emotions
  • Quantifying emotional jobs
  • The hierarchy of emotions

 

Read the full article, Measuring Emotional Jobs To Be Done, on the Branding Strategy Insider website.