Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence

Ben Dattner co-wrote this article that explains why being a great second in command requires emotional intelligence.

In 1959, John French and Bertram Raven, social psychologists, published their “Five Bases of Power” model, which has been highly influential in social and organizational psychology ever since. The five kinds of power they delineated included the ability to reward or punish, power derived from one’s rank or role, expert power (which is a function of knowledge and expertise), and what they termed “referent power,” which is rooted in personal character and charisma. In our research, consulting and coaching practices, we have learned that emotional intelligence (EI) can constitute a sixth base of social power in today’s networked, knowledge-based, rapidly changing and increasingly diverse workplace, enabling people at any level of the organization, and at any stage of their careers, to help themselves and others to more effectively navigate social and organizational challenges, and to better achieve long term goals. While EI is broadly applicable, we will focus here on how EI can help subordinates more successfully “manage up” thereby increasing their power to positively influence organizational outcomes, raise their value in their boss’s estimation, and progress in their careers.

Our research and consulting work have shown that people with higher EI tend to be more successful because they are more self-aware and better able to control their emotions, which enables them to appropriately respond to socially challenging and stressful situations. Conversely, individuals with lower EI tend to act out and behave in dysfunctional or counterproductive ways. Expressing themselves appropriately, people with high EI are able to detect others’ emotional states, agendas and priorities, and to positively influence others’ emotions in order to identify common ground, resolve conflicts, and focus on problem solving rather than on finger pointing.

 

Key points include:

  • Empathize with their perspective
  • Convey loyalty and build trust even when pushing back
  • Focus them on others’ priorities and agendas.

 

Read the full article, Why Being A Great Second In Command Requires Emotional Intelligence, on FastCompany.com. 

Bernie Heine offers advice on balancing analytical and emotional intelligence.

Our Neural Networks Don’t Have to be Rivals.

In times like these, we are all stressed, fearful, and worried for ourselves and others. Our people are concerned about their jobs and providing for their families. More globally, we are all concerned about the nation’s health and well-being. As a manager, you must persevere in managing budgets, sales targets, and the thousands of other decisions that keep your organization alive. All the while, you must attend to the needs, fears, and concerns of your people. It is a precarious balance to strike because the personal and practical sides of every interaction require us to activate distinct parts of our brain.

Sometimes we can get stuck in one or the other neural network, either the practical task-focused side or the other network that helps us reflect, empathize, and build social connections. It is a powerful leadership skill to be able to call on both parts of our brains as needed, to understand your people and their challenges and to relate to their values, attitudes, needs, and expectations.

Good leaders check for understanding of the others’ perspectives and listen empatheticallyGood leaders check for understanding of the others’ perspectives and listen empathetically to their thoughts, feelings, and motivations. Research by Anthony Jack at Case Western Reserve University describes the analytic network (AN), and the empathic network (EN). The AN is needed for the practical side, and the EN is crucial for taking care of the personal side of every interaction.

What we are learning now is that these two networks are mutually exclusive to a large extent. In other words, they actually suppress each other. When one is switched on, the other is off. The researchers contend that good leaders can toggle back and forth between the practical and the personal at electron speed. They also believe that the “toggling” skill can be developed through self-awareness, thoughtful practice, and conscious effort.

 

Key points include:

  • Shifting between the personal and the practical
  • Encouraging engagement
  • Empathetic listening

Read the full article, Balancing Analytical and Emotional Intelligence, on ProfessionalBusinessCoaches.com.

 

Ravi Rao recently co-hosted a webinar with Angela Thompson for the Columbus Retail Roundtable where they discussed the importance of emotional intelligence at all levels of the corporate arena.

I have a very weird background. Essentially, three chapters.  Chapter one was a decade spent in a science environment at Johns Hopkins and then Harvard, studying the brain, studying the science stuff of how the brain works, starting at the kind of individual brain cell, the neuron level up through the kind of broader structures, and about what do different parts of the brain do and how do we treat patients with diseases of the brain. That was chapter one. Chapter two was a short five years at McKinsey, so learning how to handle business challenges and use consulting services to help clients solve their problems. For five years in a variety of industries, not only retail, but then the third chapter, the one that’s lasted now for the last 15 years, is one where I, as an independent consultant focus specifically on the topic of how do organizations really work not only on the kind of broader structure process technology and talent level, but down to the individual. How do people relate to each other in this organization, how do they relate to each other on teams, how do they relate between different levels of the organization, the MID managers and the executives and the frontline but then also how to individuals within the organization have interactions with customers on the outside and that interaction and relationship basis is what we’ll talk about today, and how. Interestingly, a little bit counterintuitive for a lot of people, the brain has a big role to play and how we actually manage relationships so with that, I do have a few slides just as an introduction, but again they’re meant to be a dialogue starter, not a lecture for which you should have to take notes or anything.

 

Key points include:

  • The heart/head connection
  • How the instinct to connect is killed
  • Creating the emotional connection in retail

 

Listen to the full podcast, How Our Brains and Emotions Influence our Brand Experiences, on Community Roundtable.

 

 

Ravi Rao was recently interviewed on the podcast The Why Word where he explains how businesses can become emotionally healthier places to work, and reap the benefits of a happier, motivated, and more productive workforce.

Humans survive because we care about each other, because we are connected to each other, because we are so aware of each other. The challenge with something like the COVID virus, and SARS, too, is that we have even diminished the, if you will, socially acceptable ways that touch occurs for adults; handshakes, hugs, pats on the back, high fives. These kinds of things now represent public health danger. Sometimes when someone says to me, ‘Hey, I’ve got a lot of great content. I can’t figure out how to put it in a presentation, that’s gripping.’ I always say, ‘How would you do it as a play? How would you tell that story if it was in the form of an anecdote?’

 

Points covered in this podcast include:

  • How Ravi made the jump from neuroscience to acting to management consulting at McKinsey 
  • The scientific approach to emotion
  • The emotional impact on business

 

Listen to the full podcast, Emotional Business, on YouTube.

 

 

Robyn M. Bolton explains why it’s important to cultivate emotional intelligence and move out of a ‘bad neighborhood.’

‘If you spend a lot of time in your own head, you’re spending time in a bad neighborhood.’

I was deep in a bit of worry and self-doubt when my friend uttered that sentence. Immediately, my mind conjured an image of falling down building, boarded up doors and windows, overgrown yards, and empty streets (basically downtown Cleveland in the 1980s).

‘Man, I do not want to be here’ I said, probably a bit too loudly.

Everyone I know spends a lot of time in their bad neighborhoods. It’s a consequence of the world we live in — more demands, responsibilities, and expectations running into greater uncertainty, fewer options, and weaker safety nets.

There are lots of ways to spruce up our neighborhoods, cultivating a Growth Mindset is one. In his book, Positive Intelligence: Why Only 20% of Teams and Individuals Achieve Their True Potential and How You Can Achieve Yours, author and executive coach Shirzad Chamine, lays out a powerful framework and action plan to build your Positive Intelligence by increasing your PQ (Positive Intelligence Quotient).’

 

Points of note include:

  • Why Should I Care about Positive Intelligence?
  • What is Positive Intelligence and PQ?
  • How you can increase your PQ

 

Read the full article, Is Your Brain Friend or Foe? Make It Your Friend with Positive Intelligence, on Medium.

 

This post from Jeremy Greenberg’s company blog identifies five lessons that CEOs can learn from Howard Stern.

Howard Stern has been one of the most controversial entertainers since he hosted his first radio show over 40 years ago. Love him or hate him, he has enjoyed a successful career thus far – building his brand into an empire worth over $600 million as well as transforming the landscape of terrestrial and satellite radio. Stern’s success can teach us a lot about business. The following are five lessons that CEOs can learn from Howard Stern.

The five lessons covered in the post are:

1.Be authentic

2.Build a strong, diverse team

3. Balance work and life

4. Pivot naturally

5. Always be curious

Here is the lesson on building a strong, diverse team:

Howard Stern is not a one-man show. “I’m at my best when I have a bunch of people around me, when I can call on them and collaborate,” he explains. Stern’s core nucleus of co-host Robin Quivers, sound effects wizard Fred Norris, and producer Gary Dell’Abate has been working with him since 1984. Quivers plays the straight woman, Norris rarely speaks, and Dell’Abate runs things behind the scenes. They all differ from Stern in every way, but work together to make a great team. Three different people with different strengths and weaknesses, doing different jobs.
As you build your team, focus on hiring people who are not like you, but make sure they are people that you like. Diverse work and personal experience, philosophies, and talents are essential to building your company.
In fact, studies have found that a work environment that is more diverse causes a decrease in turnover and an increase in productivity. Just remember, you will have to work with these folks, so make sure you can get along with them so that they remain on the team for the long haul.

 

 

Read the full article, Beyond Baba Booey: 5 Business Lessons CEOs Can Learn From Howard Stern, on the website of Avenue Group.