Digital technology disruption

Digital technology disruption

 

Jim Klass shares a downloadable PDF that provides insight into the current disruption of the food industry with examples on how to use technology to improve cash flow and remove friction in the supply chain. 

Foodservice has changed…

A new Model is needed, one that creates value for all partners in the supply chain

Consumers will demand transparency, cleanliness and a frictionless digital experience

Operators must maximize each guest interaction their menu, and even their unit layout must change

Distributors can’t count on Sheltered Income and high-margin Exclusive Brands

Agencies will need to develop new types of offerings

Manufacturers must better understand consumer behavior and what is driving their away from home dining

Digital is the new currency

 

Key areas covered in this resource include:

  • IFMA projections
  • The overlooked divergence in operators
  • Why going digital is important

 

Access the full PDF,  The Future of Foodservice – Digital Collaboration to Help the Operator on the marketintelligence.solutions website.

 

 

This article on Sean McCoy’s company blog explains why long-term forces and trends are forcing many heavy industries to reshape value chains, change economics, and disrupt business models.

Digital technologies are making it possible for firms to expand their offering and meet new customer needs and serve new customers. For a manufacturer or heavy industrial company, this means companies that were not your competitor yesterday are your competitor today and tomorrow. The executives at GM and Ford lose many hours of sleep wondering if and how Google and Apple will eat their lunch.

Competitive intensity is also increased by changes in the cost of resources and location economics. Those changes are drying up some profit pools, increasing competition at the remaining ones. Low-cost manufacturers in China used to win on price, and domestic manufacturers on speed. For years, low-cost manufacturers have been re-shoring production as rising labor costs in China neutralized the cost advantage. Now, low-cost manufacturers can win on price and speed. The producers that stayed domestic are finding themselves stuck between a rock and a hard place.

Even if your market is stable, disruptions in other markets can dry up other profit pools, driving competitors into your space. When oil prices tumbled and oil companies needed less metal, metal companies and mines serving the oil and gas industry looked to other sectors that need metal, e.g., construction, utilities, ship builders. As a result, the mines and plants serving those industries had to deal with price pressures and declining volumes, hurting ROA.

 

Read the full article, Responding to competitive pressures in heavy industry & manufacturing, on the McCoy Consulting Group website.