Defense

Defense

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Brad Sostack. Brad Sostack spent two years in McKinsey’s operations practice and has over 15 years of leadership experience in transformation strategy, operational planning and execution, and change management. Brad served in the United States Navy as an enlisted technician and as an officer specializing in the operations and maintenance of nuclear submarines.

He holds a Masters’ of Business Administration from the University of Florida and Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from Oregon State University. Brad lives in St. Petersburg, Florida with his wife, Lana. He is currently an independent consultant where he has worked with clients in retail, manufacturing and aerospace/defense

Subscription businesses were a big deal in 2019, so what’s the forecast for 2020? Robbie Kellman Baxter shares her expertise on what lies ahead. 

I’m no fortune teller, but something about the beginning of a new year and a new decade makes me want to start spouting predictions. Actually, this isn’t the first time I have taken a crack at predictions. The final chapter of my new book THE FOREVER TRANSACTION is all about the future of subscription and membership models too.

Here’s what I think will happen.

 

In this post, topics covered include:

  • There will be a right-sizing of the “Subscription Box” industry.
  • Subscription “Managers” Will be Everywhere.
  • Subscription CMOs will swing back toward strategy and away from “growth hacking”.
  • Consumers will start subscribing to the thing itself, not just services and boxes.
  • Big Companies will try to buy their way into the Membership Economy through Acquisition.
  • Healthcare will become increasingly consumer-centric, which will lead to more forever transactions.

Read the full article, Crystal Ball: The World of Subscriptions in 2020, on LinkedIn.

Robbie Kellman Baxter reviews the progression of the subscription business model, from the early days of SaaS to a future of manufacturing based on the subscription model.

My first job after business school was as a product manager at an enterprise software company. I picked it because it was one of the first companies experimenting with what today we call Software-as-a-Service, and I could see that was going to be the futureIt just made so much sense. The old business model had been a licensing one. You paid a one-time (huge) fee to own the software and be able to run it on your site, using your own hardware. If you wanted to customize the software, you hired a professional services person to code it. Most people also paid for a maintenance contract for basic upgrades and bug-fixes. But if you had customized the software at implementation, then anytime you wanted to upgrade the software, you had to bring the professional services person back.

 

Points covered include:

-The benefits of Saas

-Transformation in manufacturing

-New business models

 

Read the full article, Why manufacturing is about to be disrupted by the Membership Economy, on Robbie’s website.

Robbie Kellman Baxter explains how to navigate the legal labyrinth when establishing a Saas business, and save a bundle on legal advice.

 

On my first day of high school, not one teacher talked about math, or history, or German, or literature, or biology. Instead, each teacher handed out and then discussed lists of rules which explained, in excruciating detail, what would happen if we were late to class, or skipped class, or didn’t turn in assignments.

I had two immediate reactions.

The first was surprise. It had never occurred to me that you could just not show up for a class, or refuse to turn in the homework. Yes, I was pretty nerdy, but still, at my good-sized, public middle school, kids attended class and mostly did as we were told.

The second reaction was fear. So many rules! How would I remember them all? And each teacher had slightly different punishments–in some cases, you just had to make up the time, which didn’t seem like such a big deal. But in other cases, your grade might drop a full letter.

 

Read the full article, How to Save a Bundle on Legal Advice, on LinkedIn.