corporate responsibility

corporate responsibility

 

Jennifer Hartz shares an overview of her company’s expertise. Most specifically, its customized approach and how it helps clients.

20+ years ago, I founded Corporate Hartz LLC to combine my educational background, corporate consulting experience, and passion for leaving the world a better place. Our broad and deep expertise and customized approach efficiently delivers significant meaningful results for companies and their stakeholders.

 

3 Lines of Business: this Hartz & Minds issue is for Businesses and Hybrid Companies

1) Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) & Environment, Society, Government (ESG)
2) Family and Individual Philanthropy
3) Speaking and Writing Engagements

Each company, client, and project is unique: from culture, to industry, geography, size, maturity, and the nature of the concern(s) and opportunity(ies). With the depth and breadth of our experience, we can establish the process, conduct due diligence, define the outcomes, include stakeholders, explore strategic options, develop partnerships, and support implementation.

With your input, we are prepared to exceed YOUR expectations, within YOUR budget, on YOUR time-table, with YOUR team and mine, with insight and efficiency.

 

Key points include:

  • Scope
  • Role
  • Collaboration

 

Read the full post, Customized Engagement Models at Corporate Hartz LLC, on CorporateHartz.com.

 

 

Kaihan Krippendorff provides a framework that can be used to address and adjust the paradigm of your organization. 

At Outthinker, we have been tracking a sea change in the idea of a corporation’s shift for two decades. We have witnessed a slow but determined march away from the view that corporations exist to serve shareholders toward one in which corporations recognize they serve many masters: employees, communities, the environment, the world. In our 2012 book, Outthink the Competition, we dedicated an entire chapter to “Be Good,” writing that “there is a shift under way from making money to doing good.”

This “be good” idea has, like all concepts, evolved as it interacts with the ideas and trends of the day. From a fairly paternalistic “big companies should take care of the little people” paradigm, it evolved into adopting the triple bottom line (TBL) framework and a corporate social responsibility (CSR) business model, to supporting the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) framework. Each acronym influenced the name we placed on the swell as “be good” rose to the surface.

Today, we are close to realizing the next evolution of this debate: what is the purpose of a corporation that wishes to endure? If you lead or work within an organization that wants to remain relevant in the next era, you want to quickly grasp what it means to “be good.”

 

Key points include:

  • What the new paradigm is not
  • Why missions are not enough
  • Removing the roots of the old paradigm

 

Read the full article, Locking In Good … And Securing The Future Relevance Of Your Organization, on Kaihan.net.

 

 

In response to the recent news on how many brands approached this year’s Super Bowl ads, Jennifer Hartz shares an article that highlights corporate responsibility in action.  

Two stalwart Super Bowl brands and commercial rivals are skipping 2021 game ads.

On February 2nd, amidst a global pandemic and national division, millions will watch Super Bowl LV! The 2020 vs 2019 Champions, Kansas City Chiefs vs Tom Brady…. I mean the Tampa Bay Buccaneers…. will face off with the NFL’s first home field advantage final game.  The Super Bowl is frequently the most watched American TV broadcast of the year.

What’s the broad and enduring appeal of the Super Bowl?

For many, especially the younger generations, with ever-shrinking attention spans, football is now likely the nation’s pastime.  Average, baseball games last 3 hours and contain 18 minutes of action. Average football games last 3 hours and 15 minutes with 11 minutes of actual sporting.  So why do millions eschew the MLB and flock to the Super Bowl in person or on television or via streaming? It’s what nonprofits call “wrap-around services.” Someone in need may ask for food, but good organizations work to help them with job training, childcare, affordable housing, clothing.

Super Bowl commercials were memes before memes were trendy.

For the biggest spectacle in US sports, that means pre-game shows, team merch, player bios, coaches, and refs, instant replays, slo-mo, music, cheerleaders, celebrities, post-game analysis, and usually intriguing …. COMMERCIALS!

 

Key points include:

  • Brands joining the bandwagon
  • The broad and enduring appeal of the Super Bowl
  • What’s different about Super Bowl 55

 

Read the full article, Big Brands Redirect Super Bowl Ad Budgets to Accelerate COVID Recovery, on CorporateHartz.com.

 

 

 

As the year  2021 begins, the conversation on climate action and business escalates. One solution that is being explored in more depth is the circular economy. In this article, Ushma Pandya provides concrete suggestions that can help your company take part in the circular economy. 

The circular economy is a trending topic these days and it refers to the idea of keeping materials in use instead of disposing them, generally by landfill/incineration. In the media, we find many examples of how consumers can participate in the circular economy. But it is also possible for companies to participate in the circular economy via their purchasing habits and internal processes. 

Here are some ways that we work with clients on incorporating circularity into their office life. Currently, many people are not in the office but we know that businesses are slowing asking their employees to come back. While the office has low occupancy it is a good time to plan for and implement some of the below.

Ensure Good Recycling

At a minimum, make sure that the organization is recycling correctly (i.e. no contamination such as liquids or paper towels in the recycle) and that all recyclables are put in the right bin. In addition, make sure to separate out specialty recycle material such as electronics, batteries, k-cups, etc. And finally implement composting (more on that below).

Just a quick note that PPE is contaminating the recycling streams currently so it is important to train employees as they come back to the office.

 

Key points covered include:

  • Establishing Reusable Systems
  • Establishing Circular Systems
  • Creating swap spots

 

Read the full article, Circularity and Businesses: What can businesses do to foster the Circular Economy?, on LinkedIn.

 

 

If you are thinking about building a marketing strategy for the coming year, this post from Kaihan Krippendorff’s company blog may have the direction you need. The “ultimate strategy” is explained and explored. 

Is “be good” a part of your 2021 strategy? If not, you should reconsider.

When I was in business school, we learned that companies exist to do one thing: maximize shareholder value. At Outthinker, we’ve been talking for years about how this belief has become defunct. Companies are realizing that focusing solely on shareholder value creates resistance to growth that ultimately diminishes value to those shareholders.

A better strategy is one that aims to help shareholders by benefiting all stakeholders: the community, employees, the government, the environment, and the world.

Becoming a force for good is the ultimate strategy.

The Pope on Big Business

Last week, in an unlikely pairing, Pope Francis met with a group of businesses, investors and other groups to form the Council for Inclusive Capitalism with the Vatican. The council, whose leaders include Ajay Banga of Mastercard, Marc Benioff of Salesforce, and Brian Moynihan of Bank of America, intends to create a more just economic system and address the biggest challenges facing humanity and our planet. Their commitment to focus on environmental, social, and governance, or ESG, practices in business reflects a growing global trend and a serious step forward for the “be good” movement.

I have gotten to speak with some of these leaders personally, and I can assure you their intentions are authentic. Why? Because they make business sense.

 

Key points include:

  • Top consumer trends for 2021
  • The importance of company values
  • How to generate innovative strategic ideas

 

Read the full post, The Pope, Big Business, and the Future of ESG, on Outthinker.com. 

 

Andy Sheppard explores the connection between business and spirituality and how one can feed the other. 

In my work, I often help leaders to dismantle silos in their organisations. It’s so rewarding to see people thrive and gain new insights as they come together. Somewhat similarly, I have also found that new insights can be unlocked through making connections across different compartments in life. Lateral thinking across parts of life that are typically separate – like our professional life and our spiritual life – can help us to thrive. I believe doing so can help us to lead richer and more integrated lives.

This article shares three connections I have found helpful between my professional life and aspects of my Christian faith. I hope it might offer interesting and fresh insights, whether or not you would consider yourself religious.

Being Hypothesis Driven

I have sympathy for anyone who questions why a search for spiritual meaning should start with Jesus. Thousands of historical and current figures have claimed insight into what gives life meaning and/or how we can live it to the full. Shouldn’t we either listen to them all, or just figure life out for ourselves? And why should we start with anyone who taught a lot about “God” when we’re not even convinced that any deity exists?

When I became a management consultant with McKinsey & Company, I was encouraged to be “hypothesis driven”. This means starting with a hypoth­esis – an educated guess – of where value is and driving towards it. The idea is to benefit from experi­ence and to make rapid progress. It remains rational because the hypothesis should be rejected or modified if disproved by the relevant data, and it is rapid because analysing this data represents only a fraction of the possible analyses. Nevertheless, as an engineer the idea still sat uncomfortably with me: it felt like jumping to a solution too early. My opinion changed when I witnessed what the expert in charge of my first engagement helped us all to accomplish. I would never have believed that so much positive change in processes and culture was possible so quickly – until I saw it happen.

 

Key points include:

  • Six types of sin
  • Toyota’s operational excellence
  • The complexity of simplicity

 

Read the full article, Can Professional Insights Lead to Spiritual Insight?, on LinkedIn.

 

 

Jennifer Hartz shares an article that identifies the key steps to building strategic partnerships between non profit organisations and private, public, and independent sectors

Nonprofit organizations and business volunteers need each other, but sometimes they speak different languages or don’t hear each other’s needs and assets.

Companies have a broad set of tools – Time, Talent, Treasure, and often goods and services.  Charities are doing a better job at educating their clients, donors, sponsors, and volunteers about what they need, what they don’t need, and why.  Please know they’re not ungrateful for your involvement and support, but efficiency matters for charities with limited budgets. (Ex. Goodwill has adopted standards for what items they can and cannot accept; this is good.)

NONPROFIT SECTOR IS BIG BUSINESS

There are 2.6 million NGO’s in the United States; 25% of the population is working for pay in these groups.  Charities are a significant portion of our GDP.  There are 32.5 million businesses in our country, directly employing 35% people.  Note: many businesses and charities sell products and services that are often paid for via government contracts, grants, or loans.

Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, the world’s awareness of the inter-dependence of the three sectors is getting a lesson in its true power – for better and for worse.  Let’s dive into a best-practice used by savvy nonprofits and businesses: Strategic Partnerships.

 

Key points include:

  • The interdependence of sectors
  • Employee volunteering & management
  • 2020 – 2021 covid, unemployment, virtual school and remote work

 

Read the full article, Strategic Partnerships among Private, Public, and Independent Sectors, on CoporateHartz.com. 

 

 

Caroline Taich provides a concise post from her website that is the first in a series of two articles that explores how to improve social sector partnerships.

One component of the question lies in the role of employers.  Intuitively I think we can agree that employers have much to gain from healthy, vibrant communities. But how much should employers invest? And what form should the investment take?

The 2020 SustainAbility Leaders Survey by GlobeScan of 701 sustainability experts across 71 countries can shed some light on the question.  First of all, the survey indicates that the need for sustainability development is more urgent now than ever.  Experts perceive that the urgency of sustainable development challenges is rising across the board – ALL issues tracked in this survey increased in importance since last year.

Challenges on the urgent list include environmental (e.g., climate change #1 and biodiversity loss #2), economic (e.g., poverty #6, economic inequality #7)  and social (e.g., access to quality education #9 and access to quality healthcare #10).

Furthermore, the experts are underwhelmed with the current level of investment borne by employers.  Only 17% of experts feel that employers are doing an “excellent” job addressing sustainable development.

The biggest rationale for employer sustainability development put forth in this survey is resiliency.  The survey draws a connection between internal & external community investment and the very livelihood of the employer itself.

 

Read the full article, How Can We Take Social Sector Partnerships from Good to Great? (part 1),  on KirtlandConsulting.com. 

 

 

Eran Zimmerman tackles the issue of corporate responsibility and the involvement of McKinsey in the Oxycontin scandal. 

When I was a young McKinsey associate, 19 years ago, I was taught that while the amount of good any single member could produce for the Firm was limited, each one of us had the capacity for causing almost unlimited damage to the famed McKinsey brand. That piece of ancient Mckinsey wisdom came back to me while I was reading a NY Times article published Nov. 27 2020, airing McKinsey’s role in the horrendous crime of marketing opioids to millions of Americans.

The damage to human lives seemed indeed limitless. I figured that Purdue’s aggressive marketing of OxyContin was perhaps (bar the East India Company’s decision to expand into India) the single most harmful business decision by a corporation ever. The Times recounts in disturbing detail the work of two McKinsey senior hands in abetting and fostering Purdue’s disastrous activity. It appeared to me that through vigorously promoting this crime against humanity, these senior consultants have come close to producing that much feared lethal blemish on the great McKinsey name.

I only spent a relatively short time with the Firm, yet I always took pride in my illustrious alumni family. I therefore felt all the more disappointed and ashamed from discovering McKinsey’s involvement in this scandal, which for many epitomizes the derailment of Western capitalism: unbridled greed, disregard for human life and wellbeing and interference with regulators’ attempts to protect ordinary people from large corporations – all going almost completely unpunished. 

 

Key points in this article include:

  • McKinsey’s involvement in the scandal
  • When lives lost become “events”
  • Ethical leadership

 

Read the full article, Open letter to McKinsey from alum on Firm’s involvement in OxyContin scandal, on LinkedIn. 

 

 

Belinda Li shares an article that summarizes the key findings from this year’s Social Enterprise World Forum and provides links to more information on each social enterprise solution.

This past September, CiTTA Partnership was thrilled to engage in Social Enterprise World Forum (SEWF) Digital, the world’s first virtual global social enterprise conference. The event had 94 live sessions and masterclasses, attended by over 5,000 participants from over 50 countries spanning all time zones of the globe. The 200 speakers highlighted timely topics within the social enterprise sphere including innovation in job creation, navigating the impact of COVID-19, alternative funding models, youth-led social enterprises, and social enterprises as influencers. There were many notable moments of wisdom during the five-day event. Policy and Research Director, Kate Bailey of Eco-Cycle in Colorado, invited participants to reflect on how to recognize ecosystem gaps and opportunities to tackle waste and challenged leaders to use the social enterprise model to create employment opportunities, educate the public on how to slow down consumption and be more conscious about how we consume, and live more sustainably.

In the panel “Creating a Social Value Marketplace,” Arielle Johnson from Fierce Staffing in Detroit remarked that social enterprises can be more inclusive by offering equity to their employees to create intentionality and a pathway for upward mobility. Audrey Tang, Taiwan’s Digital Minister, shared innovative insights on how we can use humor to combat misinformation about COVID-19 and that inclusiveness is about seeing everyone’s opinion with equal importance.

 

Key topics highlighted include:

  • Ecosystem gaps and opportunities
  • Inclusivity and inequality 
  • Helping prisoners return to the workforce

 

Read the full article, Elevating Society Through Conscious Business: Our Global Discussion on the Impact of Social Enterprises at SEWF Digital 2020, on LinkedIn. 

 

 

Jason George takes us back a few years to an original disruptor, Aereo, a company that tried to bypass regulations and use technology to distribute media content in the days before Netflix and the subscription-based business model. 

Network effects

The scrappy technology startup faced an existential threat. The company was down to its final arguments in the United States Supreme Court, where the ruling would determine its fate and if millions of invested dollars would be lost. The fact that Aereo existed at all was a byproduct of arcane telecommunications regulations, which had evolved over the decades along with the medium of broadcast television, which it intended to disrupt.

The American government mandated that over-the-air channels using the public airwaves be distributed for free. Their shows could be viewed by anyone with a basic antenna. This could be a clunky means of accessing television, as broadcasting is subject to the vagaries of weather and topography that interfere with the signal.

Cable and satellite providers stepped into the gap, becoming the preferred entertainment sources for many households. In addition to numerous specialty channels they always included the primary broadcast networks viewers demanded. The wrinkle in this arrangement arose from the fact that television providers had to pay over-the-air networks for the rights to carry their programming, even though a home viewer could presumably access the same content for free.

 

Areas of interest in this article include:

  • Subscription fees and copyright infringement
  • Innovation and regulatory workarounds
  • Modern capitalism and corporate value creation

 

Read the full article, Innovation and Hacking Regulations, on the Jason George website.

 

 

Zaheera Soomar presents an article based on the results of a recent conference on corporate responsibility for health and safety in mining. 

I recently presented at the DRC Mining Week Digital Event on a new “modus operandi” for health and safety in mining. There was some good dialogue and I have had multiple follow ups and conversations since on an organization’s responsibility. Thought it would be good to share some views on this.

In the past few weeks alone there have been various health and safety incidents in the news. Despite the extractives and industrials industries existing for centuries, with focus on health and safety and a host of advanced H&S measures in place, people are still getting injured and dying. Covid-19 has certainly added its own sets of challenges to the mix, with mining companies having to make decisions on keeping mines open, having minimal operational presence and ensuring the safety of those that continue to work. One of the main implications that faced the mining companies was health and safety in general of their employees and host communities, and whether it’s a factor of their mining operations or not – but more importantly – what their duty is at this time. Despite what we all might hope for – this is not a one off: there will no doubt be other phenomena and risks as the global operating environment becomes more volatile with increased risks relating to climate change, pandemics etc. As a result, mining and other companies are re evaluating their role around health and safety, not just from an employer perspective, but from a human rights and ethical perspective!

 

Included in this article:

  • Responsibility to employees
  • Responsibility to stakeholders
  • Responsibility to community

 

Read the full article, Rethinking health and safety in Mining – what is an organization’s responsibility?, on LinkedIn.

 

Jennifer Hartz shares encouraging words on how the current COVID-19 situation provides the opportunity to learn, grow, and serve. 

Obviously, #COVID19 creates a number of significant problems in the world, our country, businesses, nonprofits, governments, and schools. This temporary situation, current trend, or permanent transformation is challenging. So, let’s look at the opportunities for people working or learning remotely or not employed full time to improve their lives as well as others’.

REMOTE WORK IS EXPANDING

Twitter announced that most employees don’t ever have to go back to the office. “Continue working from home, or anywhere else that makes them happy and productive, forever.” Google and Facebook have extended work from home (WFH) through the end of 2020. California State University Campuses will not open for Fall Semester; on-line classes continue.  Certainly, these organizations are not going to be alone in their shift from traditional offices and classrooms.

SADLY, UNEMPLOYMENT/UNDEREMPLOYMENT IS EXPANDING TOO

 

Read the full article, No Commute? Time for Service!, on the CorporateHartz website.