climate change

climate change

Tanya Khotin provides insight into the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions through better land-use practices.  

Land use activity contributes approximately 24% of all global greenhouse emissions or more than 10 Gigaton. New ground-breaking research by the @Inevitable Policy Response (IPR) shows that not only will we reduce these emissions without much sacrifice, but we will reverse the damage by allowing forests and nature to return to what they do best — sequester emissions, aid biodiversity, and protect our air, water, and soil.  Land use will go from being a net emitter to a net carbon sink. This is a revolutionary concept that opens a lot of opportunities for investors. 

Land-use or rather land-abuse can be traced to mainly three things – beef production, industrial agriculture, and, of course, how we manage our forests and other natural areas. Let’s quickly discuss these, starting with beef, whose production to satisfy the expensive tastes of initially the Developed and now the Developing world has directly caused deadly deforestation and biodiversity loss (not to mention premature mortality, and not only of the cows).

One very NOT fun fact: we are providing housing, food, and medical care for 1bn cows (and 60 + billion chickens, pigs, etc.) while many of our planet’s 8 billion people are malnourished, homeless, and lack healthcare. And we know where the beef is. Three of the top exporters of beef –Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay — have more cows than people. *

Globally, beef is a whopper – 14% of total global emissions – roughly equal to global transportation emissions. And it’s the worst kind of emissions – methane – which has over 80x the warming power of CO2 over the first 20 years after it reaches the atmosphere. And even though beef is less than 20% of our diets, its supply chain is 80% of the greenhouse emissions in the food sector.

 

Key points include:

  • Three mutually reinforcing mechanisms
  • Energy for industry and heavy transportation sectors
  • Ag tech and sustainable ag

 

Read the full article, Land-use: a secret weapon in the war against climate change, on LinkedIn.

 

Indranil Ghosh shares the second instalment of a two-part series on hydrogen power and how it can help countries meet Net Zero targets.

Before we get into the topic of hydrogen again, I’d like to invite you to listen to my webinar on “The Future of ESG Investing” tomorrow at 10am EST. The webinar is hosted by GlobalWonks, a global research network headquartered in Washington DC. The details are in the flyer below.

In Part 2 of our series on the hydrogen economy, Indranil speaks with Ad Van Wijk, sustainable energy entrepreneur and part-time Professor Future Energy Systems at TU Delft, the Netherlands.

Governments around the world are increasingly feeling the heat and are enacting ‘Net Zero’ emissions targets. The sense of urgency only seems to have been heightened by the pandemic. As part of its European Green Deal agenda, the European Union for example is targeting 55% emissions reductions by 2030 and net zero emissions (which will be enshrined by law) by 2050.

These targets are highly ambitious. Just phasing out fossil fuels and installing renewable energy like wind and solar will still leave us far away from reaching these goals, as the International Energy Agency has argued. Indeed, both the IEA and EU believe developing the hydrogen economy is critical to reaching Net Zero.

 

Key points covered in this interview include:

  • Why hydrogen holds so much promise for decarbonization
  • Why Northern Netherlands is a strategic hub for hydrogen power
  • Cost of production

 

Read the full article and access the interview, Why Hydrogen Power Is Critical to Combating Climate Change (part two), on LinkedIn.

 

 

In this article, Supriya Prakash Sen identifies the priorities that can help put our world back together post COVID-19 and ensure we continue to survive the impending effects of climate change.

Solving the Covid-19 crisis should not come at the expense of the Climate. This is a post about why we should solve for the impending Climate Emergency in designing our new world post-pandemic – and the actions that we need to take before it is too late.

Many of the finest economic and regulatory minds are now collectively debating as to how to produce or build ‘more’ of everything (from masks to medicines to consumer and capital goods and services) in order to make sure we can go back as a society to “business as usual”, or the times of pre-Covid.

Risk perception is seen to be at an all time high- with income inequality, nationalism, politicization and financialization all adding to the unholy mix. Faced with prospects of subdued demand, supply chain disruption, credit defaults and unprecedented unemployment, the biggest fear is of ‘de-growth’.

 

Key points include:

  • Reconstructing the economic model with cognizance of the Climate Emergency
  • Green economic stimulus framework
  • 5 immediate and major business, economic, societal shifts

 

Read the full article, Priorities for Putting back putting back together our world post-Covid19, on LinkedIn.

 

 

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Tegan Blaine with Blue Cairn. Dr. Tegan Blaine is founder and principal of Blue Cairn Group, which specializes in consulting around climate change leadership and action.  She has over 20 years of experience in climate science, policy, and international development, most recently serving as a vice president on a climate change initiative at the National Geographic Society.  She also led the climate change team in USAID’s Bureau for Africa for over a decade, where she developed USAID’s strategy and investment plan for its climate change work in Africa, and built and led a team that provided thought leadership and technical support to USAID missions in Africa.  Before USAID, Tegan worked on climate change and international development at McKinsey & Company; served as a policy advisor on water at the U.S. Department of State; and taught math and physics as a Peace Corps volunteer in Tanzania.

Tegan is happy to collaborate on projects focused on climate change or sustainability, both internationally and domestically.

 

Natalie Ceeney provides a grim view, but a much needed voice, calling on business to take on the challenge of climate change.

Whether prompted by the flurry of recent announcements from government and Bank of England or by the rise in protests, it’s hard to avoid the climate change debate. Whatever our personal beliefs, its impact on the business agenda is becoming increasingly clear. 

This is no longer a ‘tomorrow’ issue. Last year, California experienced its worst wildfires in a century, not just burning over 750,000 hectares, but pushing the State’s largest investor-owned utility into bankruptcy and two others “just one fire away from insolvency”. Munich Re, the world’s largest re-insurer, estimated that global losses in 2018 as a result of natural disasters totalled $160bn, making it the most expensive year to-date for insurers. But the real cost was far higher, as under half of losses were insured. The rise in premiums likely from climate change may price many households out of insurance completely. In the UK, the 2018 ‘Beast from the East’, an extreme cold weather front, caused losses of around £1bn per day to the economy.

 

Read the full article, As the World Gets Hotter, the Heat Is on Business to Deliver Real Change, on LinkedIn.