career growth

career growth

 

Paul Millerd shares an article that comments on a capitalist system that has revived Calvinist attitudes towards those who may be less financially fortunate.

One thing I absorbed from the culture I grew up in was that someone who didn’t make a lot of money or that spent their time at something deemed a “low-skill” job was of questionable character. There were always carve outs for people you might become acquainted with, but generally people that had more money were better people.

If you only could understand one thing about American culture it’s that money is the most important thing. We say all sorts of other things about what matters but when it comes down to it the fastest way to get respect and admiration is to be rich. Our reaction to an infectious disease was to deliver four rounds of financial stimulus to the economy. Our biggest celebrities are now billionaires getting divorces rather than movie stars getting divorces.

People have a lot of feelings about money and I’ve written about how money is often just a placeholder for deeper anxieties about life. It seems people will amass millions of dollars before they try to stare the feelings that make them stressed in the face. Many people seem to get the money but never satisfy the worry. A successful real estate investor still worries about being poor1:

‘If somebody tries to screw me over, I think back to all the people who screwed my father out of money, and I react very viscerally to it because I am afraid of being poor still.’

 

Key points include:

  • The hidden force of work: shame
  • Guilt vs. Shame
  • Who has the wheel?

 

Read the full newsletter, Money, Guilt, Shame & What Matters, on Boundless.com.

 

 

Priyanka Ghosh shares an always valuable reminder on the importance of minding your assumptions and making sure others are reminded of your value.

Early in my career at a top Management Consulting Firm in New York my Senior Manager had asked me a question…”what is your brand, Priyanka”….that question had left me stumped! a) I had no idea what he was talking about; b) I always thought that when you do good work you get noticed for your work.  The idea of managing your image and shaping a perception had never crossed my mind.

Through that experience I had learnt a valuable lesson…don’t assume anything.  Don’t assume that your manager, your colleagues or the people who report to you know the good work that you are doing.  Like politicians, one has to learn to manage not only one’s career but also manage perceptions and create an image of how you would like to be perceived by others.

Lesson No. 1: What matters is not so much what you do or have done, but what other people think you have accomplished.  Don’t get me wrong – I don’t mean to say that you should ‘sound’ more than you ‘do’….but it is important to articulate what you have done.  Otherwise, people do have short-term memories and they tend to forget.  Which means that you need to manage your image as well as your real job.

Lesson No. 2: Don’t assume that people know what you are working on; take every opportunity to educate others.  Making sure that you share the right and credible information can be a powerful tool in shaping your profile in the workplace.

 

Key points include:

  • Managing expectations
  • Managing perceptions
  • The elevator speech

 

Read the full article, “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall.…” on promelier.co.uk.