career growth

career growth

Anubhav Raina shares a series that presents a model for understanding how influencing works and how you can train yourself to excel at it. It combines his personal observations with the latest research in influencing.

Note this is a three-part series:

  1. Intro (this article)
  2. CIF — Core Influence Framework
  3. Building Trust
  4. Convincing people

Appendices

  1. Using effective questioning
  2. Expanding the size of the pie
  3. Negotiation: sweetening the deal
  4. Using biases to your advantage
  5. Negotiation: When to walk away

Being able to influence someone on a key issue is the single greatest superpower you can have.

From convincing a client or boss to try out your idea, to being able to guide your family into seeing things your way.

Humans are influencing each other ALL the time, and similar to other activities –influencing is a skillset. In fact, it is one of the most useful skillsets you can learn.

Like many other behaviors, influencing too has a large evolutionary basis. We can use this knowledge to develop a gameplan for many situations that require influencing.

Building upon the work done in evolutionary sciences, psychology and management thinking, this short series sets a repeatable framework for building trust and convincing that will help you face each interaction with a solid plan of action!

How it started

I still remember the moment. I was 23 and had just found out what my division head’s year-end bonus was — a sum almost 10x my own bonus.

No one was surprised. It was expected and natural. I was told the discrepancy existed because the boss had “put in the time”, or “had taken more risk”, or “was rewarded for his expertise”, along with a number of other reasons.

But the question never stopped nagging me — what possible value-add could be worth 10x more than my own work?

Many people in my company seemed to have expertise and experience on their side. BUT they weren’t making the same money as my division head.

Could the division boss really be that much more effective at his job?

It took years (and more than a few grey hairs) of observing C-level clients, senior partners at prestigious banks, consultancies & law firms to finally figure out that the answer had to do with one thing alone — being able to influence others.

Let’s explore this thought in greater detail.

Key points include:

  • Core influence framework
  • Expanding the size of the pie
  • Using biases to your advantage

 

Access the full series, Influencing others: The greatest superpower you’ll ever need, on Medium. 

Self-doubt can stop the best talent from moving forward, but for all those who struggle with a negative voice, Rahul Bhargava provides practical steps that can be taken to deal with doubt.

We all have experienced self-doubts, especially when it came to undertaking significant life decisions. Whether it is the selection of a career or prospects of a current job, we all have been there.

There is that voice ringing in your head that constantly says that you cannot do it. But the remedy to that pessimistic voice is acting to the contrary and doing what you desire. Acting and getting your ambitions fulfilled is how you silent them forever. They are a part of our experiences as we grow up.

What causes you to doubt yourself?

The lack of confidence and the air of uncertainty gives space for doubts. There are things around us that we cannot control which often cultivates reasons for concern and anxiety. I will share my example here

I have always strived to be perfect at everything, like becoming the best artist, the meritorious student, the perfect wife, and so on. However, I never took a pause and thought, what is the definition of perfection?

For a long time, I was trapped in the self-doubt prison of my creation. Humans were not born to be perfect, we were born to be real, and to have emotions, to make mistakes and learn from them. The attribute of perfection belongs only to our creator.

Sometimes we fixate on a certain outcome which creates an immense level of fear.

 

Key points include:

  • A healthy amount of self doubt
  • Psychological means to justify behavior
  • When self-doubt becomes depression

Read the full article, How To Believe In Yourself And Eliminate Self-Doubt, on PurpleCrest.co.

 

Paul Millerd shares an article that comments on a capitalist system that has revived Calvinist attitudes towards those who may be less financially fortunate.

One thing I absorbed from the culture I grew up in was that someone who didn’t make a lot of money or that spent their time at something deemed a “low-skill” job was of questionable character. There were always carve outs for people you might become acquainted with, but generally people that had more money were better people.

If you only could understand one thing about American culture it’s that money is the most important thing. We say all sorts of other things about what matters but when it comes down to it the fastest way to get respect and admiration is to be rich. Our reaction to an infectious disease was to deliver four rounds of financial stimulus to the economy. Our biggest celebrities are now billionaires getting divorces rather than movie stars getting divorces.

People have a lot of feelings about money and I’ve written about how money is often just a placeholder for deeper anxieties about life. It seems people will amass millions of dollars before they try to stare the feelings that make them stressed in the face. Many people seem to get the money but never satisfy the worry. A successful real estate investor still worries about being poor1:

‘If somebody tries to screw me over, I think back to all the people who screwed my father out of money, and I react very viscerally to it because I am afraid of being poor still.’

 

Key points include:

  • The hidden force of work: shame
  • Guilt vs. Shame
  • Who has the wheel?

 

Read the full newsletter, Money, Guilt, Shame & What Matters, on Boundless.com.

 

 

Priyanka Ghosh shares an always valuable reminder on the importance of minding your assumptions and making sure others are reminded of your value.

Early in my career at a top Management Consulting Firm in New York my Senior Manager had asked me a question…”what is your brand, Priyanka”….that question had left me stumped! a) I had no idea what he was talking about; b) I always thought that when you do good work you get noticed for your work.  The idea of managing your image and shaping a perception had never crossed my mind.

Through that experience I had learnt a valuable lesson…don’t assume anything.  Don’t assume that your manager, your colleagues or the people who report to you know the good work that you are doing.  Like politicians, one has to learn to manage not only one’s career but also manage perceptions and create an image of how you would like to be perceived by others.

Lesson No. 1: What matters is not so much what you do or have done, but what other people think you have accomplished.  Don’t get me wrong – I don’t mean to say that you should ‘sound’ more than you ‘do’….but it is important to articulate what you have done.  Otherwise, people do have short-term memories and they tend to forget.  Which means that you need to manage your image as well as your real job.

Lesson No. 2: Don’t assume that people know what you are working on; take every opportunity to educate others.  Making sure that you share the right and credible information can be a powerful tool in shaping your profile in the workplace.

 

Key points include:

  • Managing expectations
  • Managing perceptions
  • The elevator speech

 

Read the full article, “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall.…” on promelier.co.uk.