career goals

career goals

 

If you’re running low on motivation, Rahul Bhargava provides a post that explains how high achievers stay motivated, and it may just help you get back into work mode.

Few years back, I was part of a ‘merger/acquisition management’ project. These projects are unusually stressful. As a professional, you are not sure of your next role for weeks or months. It’s like the phase after an exam and before the results. One just waits, and waits.

The numerous failed attempts of mine always keeps me curious about the secrets behind successful weight loss journeys. This journey of persistence also seems interesting as decoding its secrets will give insights that can be applicable in being motivated for most business and life goals.

“How did you stay motivated throughout?”, I asked my friend.

“I have tried losing weight countless times. Trying almost every method in various phases, right from Keto diet, Yoga, Running, I realised that there was no problem with a particular method. All of them are good.”, he said.

Then with the looks of an authority on this topic, he added “Then one day I learnt about Motivated Manny, and Frustrated Frank and this time I knew I got the solution.”

“My understanding is that motivation is a myth created to give an excuse for no action” , he continued.

Cliche as it sounded, I thought my friend was getting philosophical. But then, he went on to tell the story of his transformation, and I had no second thought about believing the statement he made.

Ever since that conversation, I have adopted the principle for any goal that I pursue. The results are highly satisfactory, and I believe that most high-output achievers have a similar principle of operation.

 

Key points include:

  • High-intensity efforts
  • Motivated Manny, frustrated Frank
  • The myth of motivation

 

Read the full article, How High Output Achievers Stay Motivated, on PurpleCrest.co.

 

 

Jared Simmons shares three quick tips that can improve relationships and move your career forward.

When you’re trying to build strong working relationships, sharing what you are hoping to achieve and get out of the work can be extremely helpful. What you get out of work is different from the project or meeting objectives. It’s not your departmental or functional mandate. It’s the professional development nugget that comes along with the entire working experience.

Perhaps you’d like to show that you’re ready to lead a global project. Or that you can work well with colleagues outside of your department. Perhaps you’re interested in learning about another part of the business.

Talking about your professional development goals builds strong working relationships in three ways:

 

Tips included in this article:

  • How to establish trust
  • How to make communication more efficient
  • How to uncovers new ways to work together

 

Read the full article, Stronger Working Relationships and a Great Career, on the Outlast website. 

 

Thinking about kicking off the New Year with the goal of transitioning from senior to executive leadership? Stephen Redwood provides advice on how to achieve the goal. 

 

When coaching clients I am often asked the question: what do I need to know to make the transition from being an already experienced leader to being effective as an executive leader

It’s an interesting, and sometimes surprising, question given that they will already have years of experience as leaders. I believe the reason they are asking is because of the realization that the most senior executive roles are often differentiated from other leadership roles by the:

  1. Weight of ultimate accountability
  2. Complexity and breadth of oversight responsibilities
  3. Challenge of motivating others to accept accountability for problem solving
  4. Difficulty of learning to ask questions rather than give answers
  5. Degree to which messaging has to be effective at a distance

This is not to say these factors don’t play a role to some degree at all levels of leadership, but at the most senior levels each of these generally carries greater consequences for the organization. So, let’s dig in and look at what I’ve often found helps leaders I work with successfully make this transition.

 

Read the full article How Do I Make the Transition from Senior to Executive Leadership? on LinkedIn.