business leaders

business leaders

 

As we move towards the end of the pandemic and a surge in business, Geoff Wilson provides a post for leaders to help navigate the next economic journey.

We are in a world of opportunity and hurt.  Demand is high, spirits (and prices) are up, and supply is constrained.  What’s a leader to do?

When I was a young man I learned microeconomics on the back of a simple diagram with two lines…one for demand (always downward sloping) and one for supply (this one goes up).

Turns out, the microeconomists were right.  Mostly.

We are living in a fever dream at the moment.  It comes with the pleasure fog of rising demand for…well…everything as people regain the confidence that they can interact and transact with one another without threatening lives. It also comes with the tormenting nightmare of not being able to hire, source, or build the products and services that they need.

There’s plenty of blame to go around. The most plausible explanation is that we are simply mired in the midst of a massive supply chain bullwhip that is synchronized around the world for once. As positive and negative information trickles out across industry chains, individuals firms attempt to adjust…and they do so badly.

Add the labor-market distortions brought by extended unemployment benefits, extended school and family support organization closures, fear of the unknowns around coronavirus reoccurrence, and general inflation; and you have a multi-faceted political and commercial game that would make George R. R. Martin blush.

But all of this is couched, at least for the moment, within a massive environment of opportunity.  Demand is popping for most of the economy, and poised to pop for much of the rest.

So (as I’m often wont to ask), what’s a leader to do?

Here are a few ideas.

 

Key points include:

  • Prioritizing the opportunity
  • Time to innovate
  • Explore new supply chain structures and mechanisms

 

Read the full article, Revenge of the Microeconomist in the Real World, on WilsonGrowthPartners.com.

 

 

Robbie Baxter shares a roundup of key insights from this year’s D2C (direct to consumer) summit.

A perk of my work as a speaker is that I get to go to a lot of conferences.

It’s one of my favorite ways to learn, and to build my community.

This month, I’m taking it a step further, and co-creating a new conference, along with my friends at FIPP, the global media association based in the UK. Definitely more work, but also a greater opportunity for learning and connection.

Next week, we are launching the first D2C Summit, where we will explore the world of direct-to-consumer revenue models, which are critical to the success of media businesses today.

I’m personally hosting “fireside chats” with 10 experts and practitioners for the conference, so I have been busy the past few weeks, researching their stories, and developing outlines for each conversation. Many of these stories center on subscription and membership offerings, my area of focus, but each has a different angle and I’m learning so much.

Here are some tidbits of what I’ve learned from this early preparation.

If you think you would find it useful and interesting, join us at d2c.global. And, as a subscriber to my newsletter, enjoy this 20% off code: SPEAKER20

A SNEAK PEEK OF KEY INSIGHTS FROM THE D2C SUMMIT

From David Lorsch, CRO, Strava, who will be speaking on Building a Subscription Business in a Social Platform

Key Learning: There’s a fine balance when your subscription is based on participation in a social community, and the organization needs to have a clear philosophy on what features should be free, and what goes behind the paywall.

From Ira Ehrenpreis, Partner, DBL who will be speaking on How Profit and Purpose are Combining to Create The New 21st Century Iconic D2C Companies like Tesla, The Real Real and Farmers Business Network

Key Learning: Your organization’s mission is increasingly important to investors, employees and customers alike, particularly in direct-to-consumer businesses, and how to balance longterm goals around impact with short term goals around revenue.

 

Key points include:

  • Determining the use case for the B2B2C buyer
  • The power of storytelling
  • Strategy in phases

 

Read the full article, Best Practices in D2C Subscriptions and the Power of Professional Development, on LinkedIn.