Agile Organizations

Agile Organizations

 

In this article, Emre Kara explains the benefits of going agile and how to do it without undergoing massive transformation. 

This article is for those of you who have heard of agile but are not sure what to do with it and how to use it in your context. If you are one of them, then go ahead and enjoy reading!

When you google agile as a keyword, you will see that in the majority of search results agile is used within the software development context. It is not surprising as agile has become popular in IT domain. We could not have heard of agile more and more these days if agile has failed as a way or working in software development. Therefore, congrats to all the agile contributors who have helped this term become this much popular today.

Now, let’s further specify the audience of this article. Let us assume that you do not work in an IT domain but you are from any type of business function such as marketing, finance, human resources, strategy, product management, business development, etc. When you have done the google search, you have probably read some of the articles about agile in software development. You understood what agile is overall and then you have started to look for agile applications in business rather than IT because it makes more sense for yourself. Then, you must have found agile case studies regarding the companies such as Spotify, ING Bank, Bosch, etc. I hope you have read their stories, they are amazing – if not, please take your time to read. These companies (there are many others by the way) have taken serious and bold course of actions to become agile and they succeeded. They did not use agile in only IT but also in other business functions.

 

Key areas covered include:

  • The one fundamental principle of agile
  • Making your employees agile-native
  • Standing up a scrum team to do a project

 

Read the full post, How to Go Agile without Massive Transformation, on Proludus.com. 

 

 

Paul Millerd takes a look at business growth data from the 1970’s onward to build a vision of future organizations and explain how the changing business landscape will impact the work environment. 

I have studied organizations, people and motivation and am fascinated by the changes that have unfolded in my relatively short career. I’ll defer to Neils Bohr to qualify this entire piece:

‘Prediction is very difficult, especially if it’s about the future’ — Neils Bohr

Since I can’t predict the future, I promise this will contain ideas that are not fully baked. I hope you can help me improve them.

Accelerated Transformation

Most people agree that that change is happening and that the pace of change is accelerating. However, if you look around, our modern organizations are not much different than they were 20 years ago. When I talk to people and HR leaders about their organizations they share with me the feeling that something is not right and that organizations need to evolve.

I’ll get to my vision of that future, but first wanted to call out three trends that I believe are driving this uncertainty.

 

Points discussed in this article include:

  • Process excellence
  • Purpose-driven cultures
  • Adaptive technology
  • Agile teams

 

Read the full article, The Future of Work: What Winning Organizations Will Look Like in 2025, on the Boundless website.

 

 

Ian Tidswell provides an infographic that provides the details of the key 6 steps to creating and capturing value in MedTech, from offer design through market access and reimbursement approval to new product transitions.

Success in the Medical Technology industry requires constant innovation. However, capturing a fair share of the value (pricing) from that innovation throughout the product life cycle is especially challenging given multiple market access hurdles, constrained healthcare budgets and diverse stakeholders.

 

The steps illustrated include:

  • Pre-launch – market access with value recognized
  • Communicating the values 
  • Gaining effective value access
  • Segment and target buyers
  • Incentives align channel
  • In-market – value delivered and captured

 

View the detailed infographic on the Een Consulting website. 

 

 

Sean McCoy idenfities three common denominators behind unsuccessful commercialization efforts.

After your Go-to-Market (GtM) strategy is designed and the planning is complete, it is time to move into execution. Implementation is when a strategy finally impacts the bottom line, which is why it is so vital to get the implementation right. Because Go-to-Market strategies are among the more transformational and comprehensive changes at a company, their execution is more complex, nuanced, and impactful, further increasing the stakes in implementation.

There are three major questions to answer when implementing a commercialization strategy: What is the governance? What is the rhythm? When do you scale? When companies answer these questions well, their GtM implementations are more successful. When they pass over these questions or answer them inadequately, their GtM implementations are more likely to fail.

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • Governance & accountability
  • The scaling model
  • The cadence of activities

 

Read the full article, 3 Success Factors to Operationalize Your Go-to-Market Strategy, on the McCoy Consulting Group website.

Robbie Kellman Baxter reviews the progression of the subscription business model, from the early days of SaaS to a future of manufacturing based on the subscription model.

My first job after business school was as a product manager at an enterprise software company. I picked it because it was one of the first companies experimenting with what today we call Software-as-a-Service, and I could see that was going to be the futureIt just made so much sense. The old business model had been a licensing one. You paid a one-time (huge) fee to own the software and be able to run it on your site, using your own hardware. If you wanted to customize the software, you hired a professional services person to code it. Most people also paid for a maintenance contract for basic upgrades and bug-fixes. But if you had customized the software at implementation, then anytime you wanted to upgrade the software, you had to bring the professional services person back.

 

Points covered include:

-The benefits of Saas

-Transformation in manufacturing

-New business models

 

Read the full article, Why manufacturing is about to be disrupted by the Membership Economy, on Robbie’s website.