Acquisition Integration

Acquisition Integration

 

David Hane has recently published an article on the challenges of post-merger integration programs.

M&A is big business. According to Refinitiv, worldwide M&A activity totaled US$3.9 trillion in 2019. Of that, there were 43 deals alone worth over US$10 billion during the year (totaling US$1.2 trillion). Yet for all of this activity, how much value is actually created? Countless studies have documented the success rate for such transactions as ranging between 10% to 30%. With so much at stake, how can this be?

Integrations Gone Awry

No one factor is driving these outcomes. In some cases, the acquirer simply buys the wrong company. For example, the buyer’s strategic intent may be to acquire a business that will help them reinvent their business model. Unfortunately, identifying such candidates is extraordinarily difficult and most buyers aren’t able to pull this off. When you’ve acquired the wrong company, no amount of integration expertise will rectify the situation.

A more common factor driving M&A failure, and one that I’ve seen firsthand, is a botched integration. One of the easiest ways to derail your acquisition integration is to ignore the people dimension. Having an explicit plan to account for the people impact in an integration is also known as change management. You could fill a crater the size of the Grand Canyon with all of the information about change management. Don’t read all of it. Just know that you need to be deliberate and thoughtful in how you plan to integrate organizations.

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • The consolidation of three businesses
  • Why progress grinds to a halt
  • Encouraging buy-in

 

Read the full article, A Requiem for M&A: The Best Laid Schemes o’ Mice an’ Men, on LinkedIn. 

 

 

David A. Fields provides expert advice on how to manage customers during a crisis. 

What do you do when your well-intended outreach call crashes into a brick wall of negativity?

Like many consulting firm leaders, you may have been burning up the phone lines the past week or two, reaching out to your clients and other contacts. Your motives are pure—admirable even. You’re checking in, showing support during a difficult time and offering help.

By and large, your efforts engender successful conversations. More executives are picking up the phone these days.

 

Advice offered includes:

  • Staying right side up
  • Responding with empathy
  • Offering help

 

Read the full article, How To Gracefully Manage Your Consulting Firm’s Shell-shocked Clients, on David’s website. 

 

 

David A. Fields offers an encouraging post on how to manage your ego when clients don’t respond to your overtures.

With a sigh and subtle shake of your head, you send one more outreach email to Pippi Burntkernels, the co-founder and COO of Plumper Popcorn, Inc. A few months ago, you and Pip had a great conversation about their operations, and you gave some advice on effectively instituting a better butter beater process.

You know that if you and Pip keep talking, there’s a consulting project at Plumper for your consulting firm.

But she doesn’t return your phone calls, nor has she responded to any of your emails. What’s going on?

 

Read the full article, How To Overcome Your Consulting Prospects’ Fear (So They’ll Call You Back), on David’s consulting website.

 

 

Pitching all the reasons why your company, service, or product is better is often received with a lack of response. David A. Fields explains where the miscommunication lies and provides a solution to the problem. 

 

You know a rain barrel full of reasons why your consulting firm is better than other firms that do what you do. Among the reasons, of course, is you. Your experience and ideas and unique perspective.

Hence, when Bethany Buttonwerk asked you why her company should work with your consulting firm instead of others she’s talking to, you quickly trotted out all your advantages.

Alas, that lessened your likelihood to win the project!

Oh no. Why’d that happen?

Let’s revisit Bethany’s query. Unfortunately, she unwittingly asked the wrong question. You then proudly tootled your answers to her mistaken question, which left her dissatisfied, disgruntled, and disinterested. (And you disappointed or dyspeptic.)

 

Read the full article, A Superior Response to “What Makes Your Consulting Firm Better” on David’s website.

David A. Fields’ first blog of the year provides a pathway forward for consulting firms in 2020.

It’s the first week of the year and one thing you’re probably wondering is what you and your consulting firm should do first. Right now.

Your consulting prospects are asking the same question. What should they do now? What should their priority be?  Unfortunately, their list could be topped with challenges that your consulting firm doesn’t solve—penetrating the blacklight market, designing an office layout that houses 200 employees in a 50-employee space, or inventing new uses for leftover holiday yams.

Where does that leave you?

Without a consulting engagement.

 

In this article, points covered include:

-What’s Important Now?

-What’s the VIP for your consulting project? For your consulting offering?

-Three Questions to Identify Your VIP

 

Read the full article, What Your Consulting Firm Should Do Right Now, on David’s company blog.

David A. Fields offers actionable advice on how to respond to a client when consulting work veers off the rails.

 

When you, your consulting team and your client all stay on task and positive, consulting is a fun, challenging and rewarding profession. When consulting work veers off the rails, though, how should you respond?

Lines are confusing

Let’s say you want to engage in outreach to your prospects. Rupert, SVP of Everything is next in line. So, you drop him a line. He answers and asks you to hold the line. (Didn’t you just drop it?)

Ugh, you’re on hold, but business is on the line. Two minutes of elevator music. That’s where you draw the line. Is it the end of the line for Rupert? Hard to know—it’s a fine line.

 

Read the full article, How Your Consulting Firm Should Deal with Clients that Cross the Line, on David’s website.