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Azim Nagree explains which methods of communication work best during a pandemic and why. 

When companies ask me how to accelerate sales or improve retention, I tell them a story. I needed to purchase a sign for my wife’s French pastry shop. I spoke with the front desk clerk who said that it would be around $90. A few days later, I got the final quote from the sales person – $265. And with that, I was out. The sales person lost the deal. But to their credit, they called me (instead of emailing me again). Within 5 minutes, the misunderstanding was resolved and the deal was closed.

Pre-Corona, reps gravitated towards email and/or Slack and/or text. Post-Corona, video conferencing is all the rage. But the reality is that savvy sales people will use a combination of different channels to move a prospect through the funnel to close.

So when do you use the phone vs email?

 

The main points of this article are:

  • Clarifying communication needs
  • Identifying customer needs
  • Confirming details

 

Read the full article, Use the phone to accelerate sales, on LinkedIn.

 

 

When building a bicycle for his daughter, Azim Nagree was reminded of the importance of two key components of best practices: process and documentation.

Last week, my daughter turned 4 and I found myself, late at night, trying to build her new birthday bike. The task would have been made easier if the instructions were decent, but unfortunately, they were written poorly so I ended up just trying to figure it out myself. What should have been a one hour project ended up consuming 3 hours of my time, as well as most of my patience and sanity (why would part A connect to part F – doesn’t it make sense for A to connect to B?!?)

As I struggled with the joining the “G-Connector Bracket” to the “U-Slide” but making sure that the “Circle Washer” was in the right place, I realized how this same struggle applies to the workplace. When someone is faced with doing something for the first time, we oftentimes do not set them up for success – instead, we let them either figure it out on their own or rely upon the dissemination of tribal knowledge (i.e. they ask one of their peers who gives them verbal guidance on how to do that particular task).

 

Included in this article examples of:

  • Processes
  • Documentation
  • Implementation

 

Read the full article, How Building a Bike Reminded Me of the Importance of Scaling, on LinkedIn.

 

 

Azim Nagree explores the necessary steps to take when the current crisis is over and shares a template you can use to build your business case.

Many of us are spending our time thinking about (and writing about) how to get through the current Coronavirus-driven situation. For those who have had to endure headcount reductions, your energy and focus is probably on just getting through the day-to-day workload.

But it’s important to think about what will happen when the current crisis is over, especially as it relates to hiring. So, when management is telling you to cut back on headcount, how do you make the case to start hiring again?

The answer is simple – data.

When you are asking for additional headcount, make sure that you have the data to back up your request. It is likely that every department will be requesting headcount, and the executive team will not approve everyone’s request. Those with a solid business case backed up with data will win, compared to those who have generic requests based upon intuition. More simply said: Bring a gun to the knife fight

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • Sales targets and quota capacity
  • Demand generation
  • Customer support and customer success

 

Read the full article, What Happens When This Is All Over, on LinkedIn.

 

 

Azim Nagree provides three factors that can help determine whether you need a single, mixed-function team or two separate teams when it comes to account management and customer success.

‘What’s the difference between Account Management and Customer Success? And more importantly, when do I need separate AM and CS teams?’

I’ve been asked this question multiple times in the last few months so it’s clear that many people are grappling with this problem. The short answer – it depends. Specifically, it depends upon your product, your P&L and your customers.

What’s the difference?

Most people know that Accounts Managers are different to Customer Success Managers. But what precisely is the difference? It lies in the relationship they have with the customer.

 

The three factors discussed are:

  • Product complexity
  • Profit and loss
  • Customer feedback

 

Read the full article, Account Management? Or Customer Success? Or Both? on the Nagree Consulting website.