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Jeremy Greenberg shares an article from his company’s website that examines the findings from a study on the challenges of the COVID-19 vaccine adoption.

STUDY HIGHLIGHTS:

  • Half of participants say they are likely to take the COVID-19 vaccine as soon as it is available
  • Safety and minimizing side effects are the most important factors driving decisions
  • Two thirds of those not likely to take the vaccine doubt its safety
  • Women are more often the gatekeepers for households and are less likely to take the vaccine than men
  • Over one third of doctors and nurses are not yet supportive of taking a COVID-19 vaccine
  • Some do not consider their doctor’s recommendation important and are leery of new vaccines
  • President-elect Joe Biden’s victory had a net positive impact on vaccination adoption

Several pharmaceutical companies have made significant progress in the development of a COVID-19 vaccine, and are planning distribution for high priority segments of the U.S. population beginning in the next few weeks. While this is exciting news, it will take some time before a vaccine will be available for the general public – optimistically by April to June, 2021, according to Dr. Anthony Fauci.

 

The findings reported include:

  • Low expected adoption rates
  • The confidence gap
  • Women as the gatekeepers

 

Read the full article, New Study Identifies Challenges for COVID-19 Vaccine Adoption, on Avegroup.com.

 

 

If you struggle to stay motivated when working from home, this post is for you. Jeremy Greenberg shares an article that explores the cons of working at home, and what you can do to improve your performance all by yourself. 

Tens of millions of us — two thirds of all American full-time workers — are now working from home. This often means we’ve had little direct supervision or oversight in months, away from our colleagues’ (and our boss’s) watchful eye.

That may feel nice… but data shows that we perform better when we know we’re being observed. For example, in a study of 40,000 Virgin Atlantic flights conducted by the National Bureau of Economic Research, one group of captains was told that their fuel performance was being monitored, and the other group was not. The captains who knew they were being observed had better fuel efficiency throughout takeoff, flight, and landing. The principle that direct observation improves work performance is commonly known as the “Hawthorne effect.”

I’ve thought a lot about this lately, because I developed a podcast called Follow the Leader. I recorded a CEO during a pivotal moment in his business, and he later told me that the direct observation helped him focus. “I was more reflective and poised than I would have been having done this on my own,” said the CEO, Taymur Ahmad, of the company Actnano. Interesting! So how can we all gain that benefit, even if we don’t have a boss (or podcaster) watching?

 

Key points covered in this article include:

  • Add self-observation to your routine
  • Get an accountability partner
  • Go public

 

Read the full article, You Work Better When You’re Being Watched. Here’s How To Monitor Yourself, on Entrepreneur.com

 

 

Jeremy Greenberg’s company has published a report that shares insight and statistics into workplace diversity.

The research is clear that diversity in the workplace is good for both employers and employees.

Many prominent studies have found proven benefits of a more diverse work environment. These benefits include an increase in innovation, reduction in turnover, a higher level of creativity, and a more effective understanding of the needs of different market segments.

The corporate bottom line is affected as well. McKinsey reports that public companies with more diverse boards have higher levels of earnings.

Many large companies have diversity programs, which include the recruitment and development of women, racial minorities, and LGBTQ individuals. Homogeneous employment settings are now considered not merely a superficial public relations problem but a business effectiveness problem.

 

Areas covered in this article include:

  • The importance of role models
  • Underrepresentation in diversity baseline
  • The diversity divide by category
  • Diversity in digital media

 

Read the full article, Study Reveals Weak Diversity Among Key Role Models, on the Avenue Group website. 

 

This post from Jeremy Greenberg’s company blog identifies five lessons that CEOs can learn from Howard Stern.

Howard Stern has been one of the most controversial entertainers since he hosted his first radio show over 40 years ago. Love him or hate him, he has enjoyed a successful career thus far – building his brand into an empire worth over $600 million as well as transforming the landscape of terrestrial and satellite radio. Stern’s success can teach us a lot about business. The following are five lessons that CEOs can learn from Howard Stern.

The five lessons covered in the post are:

1.Be authentic

2.Build a strong, diverse team

3. Balance work and life

4. Pivot naturally

5. Always be curious

Here is the lesson on building a strong, diverse team:

Howard Stern is not a one-man show. “I’m at my best when I have a bunch of people around me, when I can call on them and collaborate,” he explains. Stern’s core nucleus of co-host Robin Quivers, sound effects wizard Fred Norris, and producer Gary Dell’Abate has been working with him since 1984. Quivers plays the straight woman, Norris rarely speaks, and Dell’Abate runs things behind the scenes. They all differ from Stern in every way, but work together to make a great team. Three different people with different strengths and weaknesses, doing different jobs.
As you build your team, focus on hiring people who are not like you, but make sure they are people that you like. Diverse work and personal experience, philosophies, and talents are essential to building your company.
In fact, studies have found that a work environment that is more diverse causes a decrease in turnover and an increase in productivity. Just remember, you will have to work with these folks, so make sure you can get along with them so that they remain on the team for the long haul.

 

 

Read the full article, Beyond Baba Booey: 5 Business Lessons CEOs Can Learn From Howard Stern, on the website of Avenue Group.