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If you are stuck in a rut, at a career crossroads, or just not moving forward as fast as you want to, Christy Johnson shares a blog from her website on the difference between a mentor and a champion and how each one can help you. 

‘Where are your champions?

You’ve probably heard the hackneyed advice for career advancement: “It’s who you know, not what you know.” But how do you know who you should get to know? Figuring out who you should cultivate relationships with when time and energy is limited isn’t always straightforward.

After interviewing over 200 professionals from diverse backgrounds and industries for Project Ascendance, we found one relationship trumped the others when it comes to ROI: the champion. The individuals we spoke with described the people who advocated for them in and out of their own workplace—their champions—as pivotal to  their career success.

What’s more, when we asked participants to reflect on their professional experiences and tell us what they wished they had done differently, the most frequent regret they shared was not seeking out champions sooner. While these champion/protégé relationships are rarer than mentor/mentee relationships, our participants showed us that they can be developed over time.

There are, however, fundamental differences between mentors and champions. In a mentor/mentee relationship, the mentee receives most of the benefits and the mentor expects little in return. In a champion/protégé relationship, both people make a greater commitment to each other and have more at stake. Championing is a deeper more reciprocal relationship that requires mutual trust. Below is a quick guide for distinguishing between your mentors and champions.’

 

Key points include:

  • Reciprocal relationships
  • Affinity and social proximity
  • Constructive champions

 

Read the full post, Do you have a champion or a mentor? on artemisconnection.com.

 

 

Christy Johnson shares a post from her company blog on how to make virtual learning a better experience for students.

In this panel, experts from Stanford and from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco discussed: 

  • Experimenting with synchronous and asynchronous classroom environments, flipped classrooms, and different online tools
  • Helping students meet, network, collaborate, complete meaningful activities, and learn from one another
  • Thinking creatively about using technology and designing online learning specifically for an online setting
  • Staying positive and using what we’re learning now to improve education in the long run
  • Working with and listening to students

Themes that Emerged During a Full Term of Online Instruction in Spring 2020

John Mitchell, a Professor of Computer Science at Stanford, and Maxwell Bigman, a PhD student at Stanford’s GSE, conducted a survey of the online experiences of Stanford’s CS program and revealed those results in a paper, “Teaching Online in 2020: Experiments, Empathy, Discovery.” At Stanford, and so many other universities, Mitchell said, everyone did what they could to adapt to circumstances in the emergency shift to online instruction. It was a seat-of-the-pants-effort. Most faculty spent several times as long as they normally would have to prepare and teach their courses.

 

Key points include:

  • Reducing Zoom fatigue and facilitating student collaboration
  • Comparisons with the massive online open course environment
  • Using technology to measure and maintain attention

 

Read the full article, Enhancing the Virtual Learning Experience: Lessons from Stanford’s Transforming Learning Accelerator, on ArtemisConnection.com.

 

 

Christy Johnson shares the results from a panel discussion at the 2020 Project Ascendance Summit on how to foster inclusion in schools and the workplace.

The panel addressed:

Getting past assumptions and misperceptions about diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI)

Getting the best return on investment (ROI) possible with investments in DEI

Taking the right first steps toward inclusion

Asking questions from a place of humble inquiry

Getting Past Assumptions and Misperceptions About DEI

Michael Meotti, Executive Director of the Washington Student Achievement Council, said that WSAC is a cabinet-level state agency that deals with all sorts of higher education issues. It runs a number of initiatives, including the state’s financial aid programs, which are meant to increase participation and success in higher education. WSAC is helping more Washington residents get some kind of educational credential.

We don’t think enough about what it means for the college to be a student-ready environment, Meotti said, and we need to relentlessly scrutinize the data on how students are doing. If an educational organization keeps seeing racial and ethnic disparities in enrollment, along with disparities in student participation and success, the model is systemically racist. Changing models requires taking a deep dive into how you operate.”

 

Key points discussed include:

  • Changing systems and structures
  • The solutions illusion
  • Addressing systemic inequities in schools

 

Read the full article, How Revamping Systems and Asking the Right Questions Can Foster Inclusion in Schools and the Workplace, on ArtemisConnection.com. 

 

 

Christy Johnson provides two valuable resources with reviews of tools to help guide your team through the current pandemic situation and maintain productivity, boost morale, and ensure effective communication.

 

The internet is saturated with ‘remote work tips and tricks,’ ’10 ways to stay focused,’ ‘best home office tools and gear,’ and other guides to make remote work more productive. At Artemis Connection, we believe there is something missing: research-based tools to foster employee morale and effective team communication and collaboration. Through our focus groups and interviews, we have seen that companies who foster morale and an accepting culture outperform the competition. That’s why we’ve compiled our list of the top remote work tools to foster collaboration and effective communication.

 

And of course, if you’re interested in research-based tips to maximize your productivity as a remote organization, check out our Navigating the New World of Remote Work report.

 

Key points in the resources include:

  • Team communication tools
  • Tools to establish employee routines
  • Tools to show employee appreciation
  • How to make remote work work for you
  • Management considerations
  • How to innovate virtually
  • Logistical solutions

 

Read the full article, Tools to Foster Collaboration & Effective Communication Remotely, and access the links to the PDFs on Artemisconnection.com

 

 

Christy Johnson shares valuable insights from a survey of Seattle start-ups.

Most Seattle startups are very focused on the data—they rely heavily on data to drive product decisions. Seattle is home to Amazon and Microsoft, which have leveraged data to succeed in everything from retail, to cloud computing, software development and artificial intelligence. But it’s also home to non-technology companies like Starbucks, that are operating like technology companies and utilizing data to make their core business decisions.

Visionary technology companies like Apple, Facebook, Uber and Google  are establishing outposts in the Pacific Northwest (PNW)

Talent from Silicon Valley is migrating to the PNW because we have these innovative tech companies and a quality of life/cost of living that’s better than Silicon Valley

The PNW has consistently been criticized for not talking about social issues like race—and Silicon Valley companies have begun sharing diversity statistics with their communities, but few Seattle companies have followed suit

To understand what these facts meant for our startups culture, we surveyed more than 315+ employees at start-ups (defined as companies with fewer than 250 employees) in the Seattle area about their experience.

 

Read the results, including:

  • The issue diversity
  • Gender equality
  • What you can do

 

Read the full article, The Seattle Startup Survey Results are in…, on the Artemis Connection website.

 

Christy Johnson shares highlights from the 2019 Project Ascendance Summit and reflects on commonalities among the Gen Zers workforce, including what they expect from companies.

 

Giving back has been at our core from the beginning. The Artemis Connection 4.5% Promise supports our vision of creating a positive impact so everyone can reach their full potential. It is our commitment to helping change lives, communities, and organizations. Each year, we dedicate 4.5% of our time through pro bono work, volunteering, and board involvement in communities across the country.

 

Points included in this article:

-Commonalities among Gen Zers

-Strategies used to respond to the changing workforce

-Microvolunteering

 

Read the full article, We Believe in Giving Back – 4.5% Annual Report 2018-2019, on the Artemis Connection website.