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Neeraj Monga shares a report on WELL Health Technologies. 

This report demonstrates that investing in WELL Health Technologies (WELL.TO) is not a dream come true but a nightmare. We value Well at $1.00 to $1.50 per share. We believe that there is an 80% – 90% downside to the stock.

The old idiomatic expression “ If wishes were horses, men would fly” aptly describes the predicament of Well Health Technologies Corp. (“Well,” or the “Company”). How does it get off the acquisition treadmill without decimating its stock price and soaring expectations of investors in the marketplace? While Well wrestles with self-inflicted wounds and its philosophical conundrum, we strongly urge all investors to decamp and not wait for the inevitable demise of its lofty valuation and stock price.

There is no proprietary or path-breaking technology at Well. We believe that Well is masquerading as a healthcare company to delude Canadian institutional investors into buying its stock, given that Canada has few investable homegrown healthcare companies. That top management of Well is confused is evident from the change in tone highlighted in the quotes from Q3-2020 and Q4-2020.

Evidently, the CEO is abdicating all responsibility given multiple sub-optimal, high-priced, and value-destroying M&A transactions consummated under his watch. CRH Medical Corporation (“CRH”), the most recent and the largest, described as “monumental” in a recent press release, is also the worst of the lot. We agree that it is a “monumental” fiasco.

We believe Well’s misunderstood position as a virtual care entity, backed by a rising stock price based on COVID-19 telehealth frenzy, is enriching insiders at the expense of outsiders. Top management of Well is using an inflated stock as currency to lull investors into believing in its growth prospects. While all future write-downs at the Company will be non-cash in nature, the imminently significant decline in wealth for those that came late to the Well party, including those purchasing the CRH subscription receipts, is likely to render them in critical care.

We also believe that valuations accorded to two key transactions, Insig and Circle Medical, are borderline duplicity and that investors should be circumspect of the Company’s disclosures.

 

Key points include:

  • Canada’s leading EMR business
  • COVID-19 in the rear-view mirror
  • Li Ka-Shing Helping Well

Access the full report,  Well Health Technologies Corp: It is a Bird, It is a Plane, Noooo! It is a Torpedo. It will Blow-Up, on Antya.ca.

Jeffery Perry shares a post that explores Gen Z  and their move towards financial acumen.

Gen Z is no longer just children. The oldest members of Gen Z turn 25 in 2021 and are demonstrating their own attitudes about money and their financial futures. As the first generation to be completely immersed in digital technologies, from the ease of buying almost anything with a touch of a smartphone, endless subscription opportunities, and cashless payment systems, it is easy to assume Gen Z to be perpetual consumers with limited financial discipline. Quite the contrary, studies reveal that Gen Z is emerging with more financial acumen regarding debt, saving, and retirement compared to their Millennial siblings and Gen X parents when they were at similar ages.

Gen Z is generally defined as those born between 1996 and 2016. Why analyze Gen Z’s attitude towards money? It is because Gen Z will be the driving force in the economy very soon. According to Bank of America research, in less than a decade, Gen Z will represent 27% of the world’s income, surpassing that of Millennials.

Gen Z has witnessed two phenomena from earlier generations that inform their approach to money – massive student loan debt and out-of-control credit card debt. 

Millennials, often Gen Z’s older siblings, have racked up half a trillion dollars in crippling student loan debt. To make matters worse, according to Pew Research Center, there is an 11% default rate and over 50% of Millennials do not see a path to paying off student loan debt given their current career outcomes and prospects. Gen X, often Gen Z’s parents, has routinely racked up the highest credit card debt of any generation from early adulthood through to today. About 50% of Gen X revolve credit card balances with no end in sight. While this extensive use of plastic has fueled the economy, it has left many Gen X trying to reduce consumer debt as they approach retirement age. According to a Schwab retirement study, 42% of Gen X is more focused on debt repayment over retirement savings.

 

Key points include:

  • Student loan debt
  • Credit card debt
  • Savings

Read the full post, Gen Z Shows Early Signs of Financial Acumen, on LeadMandates.com.

David A. Fields explains how your consulting firm could benefit from his experiment with outreach.

There are people you’ve not talked with in years, and it’s a shame. They’re good people, you enjoyed your relationship with them, plus, reconnecting could help generate business for your consulting firm.

But if you’ve been out of touch for so long, is it really possible to renew the relationship? And if so, how, and is more than one bar of To’ak Art Series Blend required?

Any time you sort through your consulting firm’s network to identify your Network Core, you will find dozens (or hundreds or thousands) of previously strong, A- or B-level relationships that have slipped away.

You think, “Oh, I remember Jack! He was a client of our consulting firm years ago.” Or, “I wonder if Alicia is still the head of that trade association. We haven’t talked since the late ’90s.” Or, “Sarah… Sarah… Hold on. I forgot I had a sister!”

I’m no exception. Even though I’m a huge believer in the value of relationships, sometimes it’s hard to keep up and my consulting firm’s contact list harbors more than one A relationship I’ve inadvertently let dwindle.

Therefore, I decided to run a brief experiment on outreach to lapsed contacts.

Our Experiment

My assistant selected a slew of contacts with whom I’d had no contact for more than two years. How he selected these contacts is important, and I’ll get to that in a moment.

I sent a very brief outreach message to each one. The message is also important.

We tracked the response rate.

Because of the selection approach, we included contacts that are notoriously difficult to reach—such as an ex-client who rose to become the CEO of a large company and was too swamped to respond to me when he didn’t need our services.

 

Key points include:

  • Email vs. LinkedIn
  • The impact of revived connections
  • The relationship restarter email

 

Read the full post, How Your Consulting Firm Can Benefit From My Experiment With Outreach, on DavidAFields.com.

In this post, Jessica Lackey identifies the five costs of misalignment and what you can do about it. 

It can be easy to stay super busy by taking action in our lives and businesses. #productivity #hustleculture

But if the actions we are taking are not aligned to our deepest blueprint, our inner knowing, then we aren’t truly operating in our highest gifts that will transform our revenue and results. We might be treading water, or “wasting time”, instead of being laser-focused on what will drive traction.

And acting with misalignment comes at a cost. More specifically, 5 costs.

Missed Revenue

Knowing who you are and being aligned with how you serve in your business is the key to revenue, both for new fans and returning customers.

Are you meant for deep work with a few clients? Or are you meant for creating a large and expansive platform?

In retail, are you known for higher-end, exquisite experiences? Or being able to replicate quickly at scale?

Do you love to teach? Or do you thrive on making and mastery and deliver hands-on, “done-for-you” service?

 

Key points include:

  • Wasted busy time
  • Missing your “Dream Team”
  • Exhaustion and burnout

Read the full article, The 5 Costs of Misalignment, on LinkedIn.

One idea for starting a project in a new industry or with a new client: scan all client documents handed over as part of an initial data request, make a list of acronyms you find, and look up any that are unfamiliar.

Then: ask the client about any not found online, because those acronyms are likely company-specific.

Also: search online for “____ industry acronyms.”

How do you quickly get up to speed on a new industry?

Barry Horwitz shares an article that extolls the benefits of reading and reading some more. 

Students in my strategy classes at Boston University often ask: What applicant characteristics matter most when applying for positions with strategy consulting firms? Of course, there are some obvious ones — sharp analytical skills and strong communication capabilities among them. But one that is often overlooked — and yet quite valuable — is possession of a healthy curiosity.

As I wrote in an earlier newsletter, creative solutions to seemingly intractable problems often come from insights garnered outside of an organization’s specific field. A robust curiosity (despite its potentially negative impact on cats!) can lead you to seek additional information and generate creative insights.

Curiosity’s proven value is also why business leaders often design their offices with central gathering points (whether mailroom or kitchen areas), where individuals from different functional areas are likely to encounter one another. As Vinit Nijhawan used to say when he ran the office of tech transfer at BU, he wanted to “minimize friction and maximize collisions.”

Read, Read, and Read Some More

Of course, one of the best ways of gaining insights from a broad range of fields is to work in a broad range of fields. But what if you are early on in your career or if your career journey to date has kept you tightly focused in just a few areas?

The answer is simple: Read… broadly and a lot. Hopefully, that’s obvious. Less obvious, though, is what to read.

 

Key points include:

  • A reading list
  • Email newsletters
  • Serendipity

 

Read the full article, Curiosity Killed The Cat… But It Can Keep Your Business Thriving, on HorwitzandCo.com.

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Florian Heitzenberger.  Florian has a BCG background, worked as Manager Corporate Business Development/Strategy for a global industrial goods company and has been running his own consulting firm focused on strategy, business model innovation, post merger integration and start-ups since 2018. Florian lives in Vienna (Austria) and is happy to collaborate on projects in Europe.

Susan Meier shares a post from Workspace Studio on the office of interior designer Antigone Michaelides.

What do you do?

I tell spatial stories. People ask sometimes, what’s your style? And I say that that’s an irrelevant question, and I refuse to answer it. What matters is that I listen, and I get this raw material, this narrative. And because I have certain tools from education and experience, I can translate that into a spatial story, which the person who gave me the narrative can inhabit comfortably.

Tell us about the space where you work.

It’s a double-height space, and upstairs is my son Leo’s loft. We have this very big solid wood surface that is one desk. One part is for Leo, and I have my working corner. Underneath the desk is a collection of materials, like stone or oak samples. All of my samples, all of my files, all of my stuff is in this little corner of the universe.

How would you describe your creative process?

On one side of my space, I keep what is current. At the moment, it’s an Alexander McQueen book and some things that fell off a chandelier. This is the kernel and the start of the process. There’s the start here of something that looks very feminine, very ethereal, very whimsical, but the underlying premise is very structural and rational, just like Alexander McQueen’s.

For commercial work or for museums or for reference, I use sketchbooks, because I need to flip back and forth. For residential projects, for some reason, I don’t want to use my sketchbook. I do it on loose leaf of paper. I don’t know why; this is a mystery to me. I start sketching, and it’s the beginning of an expression; we rise from the floor up, and onto the walls, and now I know where we’re going. The idea of sculpting space from the inside out is beautiful to me.

 

Key points include:

  • What helps productivity
  • The most important elements of the work environment
  • Rituals in the workday

 

Read the full article, The Design Of Folk Tales, on Workspace-studio.com.

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Lynn Compton Seay with Seay Associates. Lynn is a registered nurse with 5 years of clinical experience and a deep understanding of frontline care delivery.  As a management consultant with McKinsey & Company, she worked broadly across functions (operations, strategy and org) and developed depth in large-scale enterprise transformations. As a Vice President and General Manager at Kaplan North America, she led and grew a division that creates and delivers digital products for the institutional & retail nursing education markets.

She is excited to join her husband Andrew at Seay Associates, LLC, where she will be building out the firm’s healthcare practice. They live in Dallas with their daughter, Genevieve, and cat, Chicken.

Robyn Bolton shares one simple rule that can help build a culture of innovation and a solid team. 

I do.  We do.  You do.

My Mom taught pre-school.  It wasn’t a job; it was her calling.  Kids gravitated to her like she was the Pied Piper, and she greeted them with unequaled patience, acceptance, and love.  Years later, her students would talk about how she changed their lives when they were only four years old.  And she did it by following one simple rule.

I do.  We do.  You do.

Whatever she was teaching, whether it was sitting still at a table and eating a snack or writing the alphabet, she always did it first so the kids would know that it’s possible and not be afraid to try.

Then, they would do the activity together.  Side-by-side, they would eat a snack or draw letters, the kids occasionally glancing to the side to mimic her and my Mom gently coaching and encouraging.

Finally, she would step back, never disappearing completely, always within sight, but no longer right there.  By doing this, she created the space for them to be independent and to build confidence.

It is easy to say that she was teaching.

It is more accurate to say that she was leading.

It is precisely what executives need to do if they want to build a culture and capability of innovation within their teams and businesses.

I do.

It is not enough to encourage your team to take risks.  YOU need to take risks.  Ask a question in a meeting.  Say, “I don’t know.”  Challenge the status quo.  Be the first to do something different or uncertain, so your people know that it’s possible and aren’t afraid to try.

Key points include:

  • Fostering confidence
  • Avoiding judgment
  • Stepping back

Read the full article, Follow This 1 Simple Rule to Build a Culture and Capability of Innovation, on Milezero.io.

 

Robbie Kellman Baxter asks and answers what features should be free and what should be paid in a freemium subscription?

I get asked all the time what features should be freemium (aka free forever) and what features should go behind the paywall.

The answer is, of course, it depends.

But here are some useful frameworks.

Does your business model depend on VIRAL MARKETING?

If your “free” subscribers are a marketing channel for attracting paid subscribers, you might want to invest in making your offering attractive for free subscribers.

Does your business model depend on a NETWORK EFFECT?

If your free subscribers create value for your paying subscribers, simply by participating in your network, and are part of the product, you might think of your investment in features for free subscribers as part of your product development investment. This could be through their content, through their data, or even through their eyeballs.

Does a significant percentage of your freemium subscribers predictably CONVERT to paid?

If your free subscribers are your best acquisition channel, that’s a good reason for continued investment from your lead gen budget.

There are some other things to consider as well.

Have you ALREADY offered the feature for FREE?

Many businesses launch with generous free offerings, planning to “monetize later”. This can be an effective way to build community or to beat competitors in a land grab situation. However, when you build a trusted ongoing relationship by giving stuff away for free, you might be building an expectation, an implied commitment, to giving it away for free forever. It can be very hard to put something previously available for free behind a paywall.

Key points include:

  • Later monetization
  • Lost leaders
  • The top guiding principle

Read the full post, What Features Should be Free and What Should be Paid in a Freemium Subscription?, on LinkedIn.

 

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Daniel Behr. Daniel is an entrepreneurial leader skilled at developing and implementing growth and innovation strategies. He brings a unique combination of experiences in strategy consulting, startups, business development and the commercialization of new technologies in the life and physical sciences. Daniel seeks to help leadership teams figure out “where to play” and “how to win”. He is based in the Boston area.